Why Knowing How to Farm and Garden is Important

Discussion in 'Farming and Gardening' started by Aneye4theshot, Jan 24, 2016.

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  1. Aneye4theshot

    Aneye4theshot Expert Member
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    Some may ask why farming and gathering is essential. A simple answer for that is food is very important for humans to survive. Meat may not always be available, so when you have to, it is good to know how to farm. When farming is not available, it is good to know how to gather food. Some people do not consume meat so farming and gathering would be essential to them. Also consuming just meat is not the healthiest thing to do so some vegetables are essential to your diet. If you are trying to survive off grid or you are caught in a survival situation hunting big game or any animals for that matter might be out of the question because you are not prepared. So knowing some edible plants to gather and where to find some seeds so you can start a garden might be essential to you if you find yourself in a survival situation. If you find yourself in a position where you need to provide food for a quantity of people farming and gathering becomes essential to you very quickly. It might take a while to catch and hunt enough meat for everybody so having these people pitch in and help you farm, gather and garden will be the most efficient thing to do.
     
  2. filmjunkie08

    filmjunkie08 Active Member
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    My parents were older and were teenagers during the Great Depression. I remember my dad voicing his concern about our current society. Should another economic disaster happen, he was concerned that so many people were growing up without knowledge of growing their own food or how to preserve food. There is alot of truth in that. That is why I am glad every time I see people at the garden centers asking questions and picking out vegetable plants for their gardens.
     
  3. acheno84

    acheno84 Member
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    It's very important to learn to grow your own garden. My first garden was a trial and error. It's sad that my plants had to learn the lesson for me, but I learned what to do and what not to do. I was able to grow one string bean, 9 pea pods and 2 mini tomatoes. Now that I've got it all set up in a different location, My garden has taken off in the best way possible. I think it helps that I'm working at home as well and can monitor the time that they get in the sun. I'm excited for my first harvest. I'll have to share pictures. Thank you for the helpful tip :)
     
  4. Corzhens

    Corzhens Master Survivalist
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    I was born and raised in a city apartment and although I take summer vacations to the home in the province of my grandparents, I have a zero knowledge in farming or gardening. It's only when I married that I started to know something about plants. And my first encounter is the tomato that grew on the sidewalk which had more than 80 fruits. Yeah, a stray tomato with that many fruits.

    When we moved to a rented apartment, there was a big backyard that is grassy. But the garden is a small plot for ginger and some sweet potato. In this present home, I have learned a bit about gardening and the proper care of plants. Most of our plants here are edibles because my husband is not fond of flowering plants. Now, if I would compare my zero knowledge with my present knowledge about gardening, I'd say that it is beneficial in this pressnt state since I can farm my own food plants when something drastic and calamitous would happen.
     
  5. HealthandVitality

    HealthandVitality New Member
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    I agree. My grandparents were always self-sufficient and I cannot ever remember when they had a reason to go shopping. The milk was from the cows on the farm, so was all the meat, the vegetables were grown in a garden that was huge just a 5 minutes walk from the home and for medication, there were always herbs that were recommended. Even when someone broke an arm or leg, there were medicine men that just put that joint back together with the help of some herbal pain relief. Not many people today can survive without running to the stores for chemically preserved doughnuts etc. My grandfather died at 94 and my aunt was over 100 and they were in good health, we have a lot to learn.
     
  6. Endure

    Endure Expert Member
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    Still is a huge deal of work to perform in order to grow enough crops to truly replace most vegetables and fruits readily available in markets, We can't just sow only potatoes, need to grow a wide variety to ensure nourishment . For that reason farming as a business exist, we pay all the time and commitment a farmerput in running a farm in order to not do that ourselves. Of course, this only applies when you're living in a modern society.

    When you're on your own. You have to put a lot of time to guarantee your survival. Whether is worth it or not is a matter of choice.
     
  7. jonthai

    jonthai New Member
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    In case of a natural disaster, Farming is a very essential part of surviving after the disaster occurs. Although , with the harsh conditions the disaster may leave the grounds, it is important that we pack tools , so the soils can be fertile again. Variety is very important in these situations, due to the reason that, if we only plant one type of plant , we are helping the several plagues that attack these specific plants, which is terrible for us.If we prepare enough and know the necessary skills , we will surely be able to survive after some sort of disaster.
     
  8. glreese

    glreese Member
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    Ever since I was a little child my parents and grandparents engraved in my mind the importance of being able to garden. My grandfather is a very successful gardener who grows more than enough food to sustain his three children, and their families through the summer and fall. He grows enough that we can can the leftovers for use in the winter and spring. I have learned a lot of gardening techniques from him. I am happy to say that if something bad ever did happen, my family would not perish due to a lack of food.
     
  9. John Snort

    John Snort Well-Known Member
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    If you don't know anything about farming then you might find it real hard to survive when you no longer can buy food from stores or when no one is willing to sell any food because they need to feed their families. While most people don't believe that things will change fact is in less than 2 decades we may have a global food crisis. Available food will be too expensive to buy and if you didn't learn how to farm you might starve . . .
     
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  10. overcast

    overcast Member
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    I think gardening skill along with cooking builds your skill set for survival. You can do a lot of things with these skills. And cooking for example that is worth having skill. There is also farming and gardening which helps in many ways. Farming skill requires some space which I don't have so not much aware of that.
     
  11. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Chill is in the air. It frosted last night. So, I was doing some final mowing today -- to include the squash-growing part of the garden.

    I put Sta-Bil in all my outdoor machines, roto-tiller, push mower, lawn tractor, ... . Still having to use chainsaw and this will continue through winter. I've been using Sta-Bil for four decades now. My equipment always lasts until spring. Usually have to use some starter fluid spray to wake-up engines in the springtime. Oiled / greased the machines.

    If the SHTF, I have enough decent dirt space to quadruple my garden size. We are currently having difficulty dealing with the bounty of what we currently have, but there is the matter of barter. For any garden-raiders, I have several shotguns & high-power rifles -- plus the regular and specialty ammo to take care of varying defensive situations.

    Should we have to bug-out, I've got a son living in another state that is FAR more conservative than this state. He owns enough land for gardens. I could pack-up my farming equipment and head there. I have license plates for that state (out of date, but proof that I've lived there), plus plenty of proof that I am from that state. Another son just bought all-new welding equipment -- gotta have dependable equipment for hard-times. Worn-out equipment could equal bad situation or even death.

    In a SHTF world, those who can't take care of themselves will die. Good to have some physician friends and EMS also -- they don't have time to raise big gardens, at least most do not, so they will take barter. All around the world you see physicians taking barter. I've made acquaintance with physicians who escaped the Soviet block and Eastern Europe -- government pay didn't even begin to cover their needs, so they always were being paid in barter and in precious metal coins, sometimes jewelry. Pretty bad when physicians have to be a part of the black market. So it goes. Horrible world.

    My son has a bunch of friends; everyone down there is armed to the teeth and proficient with their firearms -- normal situation, nobody would have to change much, if any, for a SHTF world. I've already mapped and scouted rural roads I would need to use to get back to God's country. My son and his friends are super young and strong -- ages around mid-thirties to early forties. That son is so big and so hairy that he could go without having to buy wool -- he wears shorts in the snow and ice. Burns-up in the summer however.

    Plus in the rural parts of that state, everyone can work on machinery, do electric wiring, build buildings, do some masonry, ... they are poor so they just do their own work, not going to pay for something that they can do themselves. The population in that area is stable. Interlopers post-SHTF would be toast. In the here and now, people who don't fit in have a tendency to go away. I love my home state. I'm thinking about buying a beater-truck just for hauling. I've always owned a pickup, but don't have one right now. I can get a surprising amount of cargo in my 4x4 SUV, to include building supplies. Still, I need to get me a pickup.

    I've made me a list of items that would help me do better in a SHTF situation. The wifer and I have been a good little boy and girl about stacking back food stuffs. But there's always some sort of hardware we all want to have.

    Is everybody else getting their gardens and gardening equipment ready for the snowy months ahead?! You folk in the tropics have those precious fruit trees. That's so wonderful! Here, we have to can our veggies. Reminds me, I still have some peppers to pick, plus some hot peppers to grind. Now that's on the pen & paper list. The mountains can be a killer in winter, but if you are from mountain country, then you were just raised to do without the grocery store.
    .
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2020
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  12. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    I keep hearing people talking about having doctors and medical people in their group, I dont know about the USA but in the UK medical staff are on the front line, mostly in big city hospitals but even the rural doctors dont live on the premises and can live hours away from their patients, in the SHTF they are just not going to be available and many will die in the first wave of violence post event.
    as for gardens, most urban people do not know how to grow food, if they have a garden and many city people dont, its a play area for the kids, post SHTF is not the time to start learning how to grow food, many of them wont have the proper seeds or any tools for the purpose anyway.
     
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  13. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Lonewolf,

    I'm one of your Forum Members with a small group having medical people (1) and the rest of us with some of the tangent skills. It really is YOYO - You're on your own - if/when Hades breaks loose. Even a major hurricane supersaturates the small rural hospital here. LEOs and firefighters get priority care ... the area is weak in emergency health care - and this is presuming there's roads still open and clear.

    I can anticipate mass migrations from the urban areas to the countryside if roads/gasoline stations still open. This is the typical scenario for major events. A rough hurricane here in Hurricane Alley has the Shendandoah Valley loaded with cars. The nearest parking space is "out West". Much camping gear lashed to outside of vehicles.
     
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  14. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    Of course I'm speaking purely from a British prospective, I have no knowledge how things could evolve in the US, in the UK they have shut all the small country hospitals, even minor injury units have closed, my nearest Emergency hospital is 30 miles away thats an hours drive on our roads, a flying ambulance(helicopter) is used out here for serious cases but that wont be available post SHTF and there is only the one anyway and its funded by a charity.
    The British arent used to evacuating and will probably only go as far as the nearest "emergency centre"- a motel or a school gymnasium.
     
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  15. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Lonewolf,

    Your description of the Br rural hospital scene is, I believe, the trend we will follow here in the US.

    There are efforts going on (eg insurance rates, electricity costs) on the coastal areas - especially the Atlantic's "Hurricane Alley" - to have area residents being only critical personnel and the related. The elderly, infirm, etc will have to move inland. I see this in our rural hospitals; resources with the huge government support are allocated inland. The public schools will get configured to mesh with the new plans. At least, so far, this is the trend I see.
     
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  16. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    I know of a medical school whose inception was founded upon getting physicians to serve in rural areas. Residents from that school helped keep open a clinic in the middle of Nowherersville Appalachia. The clinic would open a few years, then shut it doors, then get the resources to open, ... round and round.

    One impediment to having small clinics is that robust hospitals have helos to dust-off emergent cases. These big hospitals are basically saying, "Don't worry, we can cover this."

    Another thing about America is that you have a lot of people in some states scattered over hundreds and hundreds of square miles. Here we train EMS crews to do a whole lot of work that only physicians perform in other countries. EMS drill and establish intraosseous I.V. lines, dart patients with pneumothorax, administer med.s (radio contact, phys. orders), ..., EMS will often follow a patient into hospital and continue treatment.

    I could write on and on about this. I am a BIG supporter of rural medicine. I'm also behind creating a whole lot more physician's assistants. Best practices protocols are often set with little variation, therefore it doesn't always take an MD to execute these procedures, often life-saving. Small clinics also are a super benefit to the overall health, psychological and physical, of one-stoplight towns. One crew that are easy to train as EMS and even as physicians are Army medics (68 Whiskey).

    I think it would be great to man rural clinics with physician assistants and nurse practitioners. They could refer cases requiring specialized treatments to small town hospitals or medical centers if need be. Too, this is FAR more cost-effective. Residents get needed experience in these venues. It all works-out money-wise and the locals get chronic conditions better maintained. Centralized hospitals often turn into some unholy, unrecognizable behemoths cranking patients through without anyone tracking these individuals. Patients rapidly get to be "the unknown", a bunch of ghosts. The bigger the hospitals get, the bigger the monsters. Resources get sucked into them like a black hole. Same phenomenon as with big government.
    .
     
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  17. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    most newly qualified doctors want to work in big city hospitals in the UK, "general practice" i.e. family doctors is hard work, our last doctor went sick because of over work and never returned.
    a previous doctor told my wife" you live on the edge of everything and in the middle of nowhere" and that he wouldnt want to live there, he wanted all the resources close to hand and couldnt or wouldnt live without them, which seems to be the prevailing opinion for most non prepared urban folk.
     
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  18. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard ! Staff Member
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    The cost in money and time, makes most new physicians want / need to earn lots of money. They also want to live the "Good" life. Few new doctors are the humanitarian types anymore. I don't fault them but I also do not sing their praises either. They are just one group of many skilled trades, nothing more, nothing less.
     
  19. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Old Geezer,

    Ages ago, hopefully still there, the restaurant "Sanitary Fish Market" in Morehead City, North Carolina had a display board - museum quality - about restaurant patrons and area events. One framed article involved a North Carolina medical doctor who was using Dr Albert Schweitzer's concepts he used for field clinics in Gambia for adoption in rural North Carolina. It worked as far as health care aspects go.

    Above relates to China's "barefoot doctors". The "basics" is frequently enough care to get the patient into the healing phase.

    Our US problem is less about those dedicated to rural health delivery and more so to health care politics......as if I even had to write this for any of our Forum Members.

    I used to be a DAV rep at rural health care delivery via Dept of Veterans Affairs mobile clinics dealing with 10 rural Virginia counties. Later, working as a vol in Appalachia, it was apparent that so much is cartel-run, our development of emergency delivery (my specialty) was slowed down.

    Some observations from the field:

    A Physician's Assistant (PA) is a Medical Doctor who ran out of $$$ for the other formal degree program that's cartel controlled.

    A dental assistant / Dental Hygienist ... we have some prototype programs for them to entry dentistry.

    Nurse series: De facto M.D.s by those who are dedicated.

    I've had some of the best medical care in the US by "paras" - the senior EMT level on some charts. It's not nationally standardized as yet but a Virginia Health District Director is allowed to authoruze EMTs to perform higher elechon emergency care under some conditions. I'm familiar with this because I'm the volunteer scribe.

    There is a model Federal regulation that the states can use - Virginia does - where, during emergency conditions, and the person had the training, even if years ago, can use these skills under the standard "what you can properly do and report this later on when conditions allow".

    A BIG neglected matter - the medic folks aren't into the business portfolio stuff - is personal LIABILITY. We're working on this. Your Forum Member here has some draft proposals at the national level - reaching the right folks - to ditch the nonsense. The Trump administration is supportive.

    The rest, as they say, is KEEP THAT damn first aid / medical kit fully ready for Hades !
     
  20. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning TMT,

    Above analysis mirrors mine.

    I do consider you one of the sharper knives in the drawer.
     
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    1. TMT Tactical
      Thank you for the praise.
       
      TMT Tactical, Sep 22, 2020
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