Your Own Survival Seed Vault

Discussion in 'Gardening, Plant Propegation, & Farming' started by Koala, May 26, 2017.

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  1. Koala

    Koala Well-Known Member
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    I was browsing the internet and came across a product called ''Survival Seed Vault'' - it's basically a tin can that contains various survival seeds for long-term emergency storage. So, if there was a disaster and everything would be destroyed, you would open the can up and plant these seeds for food and so on. It made me think which seeds would I personally put inside such a tin can.

    Let's pretend you have to make this tin can yourself and you can put inside twenty seeds for emergency survival storage. Which seeds would you put inside and why?
     
    Keith H. likes this.
  2. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Growers like ourselves save our seeds for the next crop anyway, so we obviously save the same as we are presently growing each year. What you grow, will depend on where you live. Probably no point in my listing ours as I live in Australia.
    Keith.
     
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  3. iamawriter

    iamawriter Well-Known Member
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    It is like a backup that we do with our data. I have always kept a few seeds aside after sowing a few. Should they fail to germinate then I always have some kept aside. I had that experience just recently. I forgot to sprinkle ant powder as I call it at the time of sowing my flower seeds and the ants did invade and destroyed most of the seeds sown. I sowed again but this time I remembered to sprinkle that powder. The seedlings came up well.
    But once I get seeds from these plants I will not keep those seeds in the 'Survival Seed Vault' as you call it as there would be fresh seeds put in there.
     
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  4. Koala

    Koala Well-Known Member
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    Yeah, I guess that's true iamawriter. But I've read an article that if you dry your seeds up you can store them for up to 10 years and they will still produce crops - not the regular drying process though. It's important to control the temperature and there are a few tricks.

    Also, Keith, that's one of the reasons why I thought it might be a fun thing to compare our lists. I also store the seeds for next planting season but I bet that we have quite a few different seeds that we plant/store. Based purely on the fact that you live in Australia, I live in Europe, many other members are from the United State so, of course, the soil is completely different and so are the seeds that will grow - at least to some extent. That's why I was curious how different our seeds really were :p

    Maybe some of the people that don't have their own garden will also join us and start thinking about these seed vaults.
     
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  5. iamawriter

    iamawriter Well-Known Member
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    Unless one is in seed business collecting old seeds to my mind may not be quite useful as the gardener gets fresh seeds which have a better chance of germination than those that have been stored for years. This is my experience. It is funny really that I get so many seeds and there being no takers I really do not know what to do with them. :)
     
  6. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    we all need to have our own seed stock, not the seeds you see in most stores these are no good for long term storage, they are labelled either "hybrid" or "F1", and will only grow the one time, the resulting seeds are infertile, what you need are "heritage" or "Heirloom".
    sure the hybrid ones will give you a feed one time in an emergency if you have nothing else, but its a one time deal.
     
  7. jeager

    jeager Master Survivalist
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    No the seeds are not infertile.
    They are as fertile as any other seed.
    However:
    You can save seed from hybrid plants or from plants that have been cross pollinated. It is important to note, however, that the plants you grow from these saved seeds will carry the genetics from both ‘parents’ and may display different characteristics than you are expecting.
    http://www.theselfsufficienthomeacre.com/2013/10/can-you-save-seeds-from-hybrid-plants.html
     
  8. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    Last edited: May 29, 2017
  9. jeager

    jeager Master Survivalist
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    O.K. Heirloom is what I look for but in the States much of what is sold is hybrid kind.
    I often order seed online that is heirloom.
    I better get busy and order some.
     
    lonewolf likes this.
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