Zippo Lighters, Extending Fuel Life

Discussion in 'All Resources About Fire' started by Old Geezer, Sep 17, 2020.

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  1. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Reducing lighter fluid evaporation in your Zippo









    This one, I myself have done. It does lengthen the storage life of the fluid, but makes the lighter less immediately accessable.


    Butane conversion
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Z47G1H4me4

    I just bought another Zippo. Why? It was pretty. OK, so it had a beautiful woman's image on the case, Art Nouveau. I began smoking in Jr. High, smokin to get high in high school, but I began always carrying a cigarette lighter & pocket-knife in grammar school. Cave man say, "Must make fire! Must cut meat! Og happy. Time man give Og Zippo, big can fire magic water. Zippo God!"

    Everybody, please add your ideas in the realm of making fuel last longer in a Zippo. I know that we all have several containers of hurricane matches, but hey, Zippos are handy.
    .
     
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  2. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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  3. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Yes, I do buy naphtha at the hardware store. So you have your handy small can that has the tiny fuel spout, but you fill the little handy can using a quantity can of naphtha you bought in the paint thinner section of your hardware store.

    26a8494fc137954ddd9967a7614bcb8a.jpeg
    26a8494fc137954ddd9967a7614bcb8a.jpeg
     
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  4. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I make what some call ranger bands by cutting bicycle innertubes into bands that are from 1/4" to 1/2" wide. If you will put one of the 1/2" bands around the zippo covering the hinges and seam it will make it waterproof and eliminate a lot of the evaporation without making it a problem to use and will also keep a recently filled lighter from leaking in your pocket.
     
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    1. Old Geezer
      One of these videos has a guy using a section of bike inner-tube. Now this has been confirmed by a trustworthy person. Thanx Tex!
      Stopping leaking flammable liquid and its vapors is good all-round. Sure can't get the cheap little plastic butane lighters near any open flame situations -- "most don't leak" = not comforting. I often work near K-sized oxygen tanks, several tanks stacked side by side, plus working near oxygen delivery systems. O2 levels above 21% ambient.
       
      Old Geezer, Sep 18, 2020
  5. F22 Simpilot

    F22 Simpilot Master Survivalist
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    Are there any dangers in using another gas? Be it kerosene, diesel, gasoline, etc. Obliviously, you wouldn't want to light a smoke with that.
     
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  6. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning F22,

    An indirect response to above;

    During the Vietnam War, some of the local ladies would sell glass vials of lighter fluid to the soldiers at a very low cost compared to buying a can of American stuff when/if returning from the thorns to a base camp.

    The vials contained naphalm.
     
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  7. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    I went with a kaschie bullet lighter. It's a big peanut lighter with a screw on top.
     
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  8. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Over the many years I carried a Zippo and finally started making leather belt sheaths to carry them. It always sucked if I put a little to much fuel in one and then had it leak in my pocket. That stuff causes a chemical burn that takes a couple or three days to stop burning. In a pinch I have put kerosine in them a few times. It worked but stinks and doesn't burn as clean. I think that the regular lighter fluid might be some form of massive high octane gasoline without all the additives in it.

    Contrary to what most people think, higher octane means a higher spontaneous flash point temperature. I used to mix 135 octane avegas (Aviation fuel for the old radial airplane engines. I worked for a crop dusting service and did the refueling every morning.) with shell premium when I went to the drag strip. My heavily modified engine had at least a 13 to 1 compression ratio and low octane gas would ignite just from the compression and cause preignition problems. The higher octane gas allows for more complete compression and burns giving you more power from the firing. The only problem with that Avegas mix was that it was hell on valves and I usually had to replace the valves pretty often. I ran a 235 bored to 250 inline 6 cylinders in the V8 unlimited class. there wasn't a 6 cylinder unlimited class. The inline engines generally have a stronger low end and a hell of a first 1/8 of the mile but then can't match the V8 in rpm and longer legs at the end. I was a TERROR at street light drag racing and embarrassed a lot of Corvettes. 3 aces set up progressive made it run like a sh1+ eating ape but was mean to idle. Ah yes, the good old days when I had nothing better to do than spend my spare time with my head under the hood of my car.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2020
  9. F22 Simpilot

    F22 Simpilot Master Survivalist
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  10. F22 Simpilot

    F22 Simpilot Master Survivalist
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    Lighter fluid may be liquid butane.

    Found this on naphtha octane. Very interesting.

    https://www.greencarcongress.com/2013/10/20131008-naphtha.html

    So I take it a low compression engine could burn it?

    Another fuel source for Zippos could be liquid paraffin wax I suppose. You can buy it by the gallon at Walmart or other places. Also, Coleman campfire can be had by the tin jug. Though, unlike paraffin oil, not sure how long campfire fuel lasts. I know gasoline for example can age over time and losses its power.

    Edit-

    Looks like butane is a 90. http://www.chemgapedia.de/vsengine/...enwasserstoffe/octanzahl/octanzahl.vscml.html
     
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  11. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Even before I smoked I carried a lighter and a pocket knife too. Back then that lighter was a multipurpose tool. A Zippo allowed you to do more than just light a fire. It let you light a lady's cigarette with style! I could whip mine out and pop it open like a switchblade with one hand and then with a snap of my fingers had a fire and my hand wrapped around it to offer to a lady. Women back then would just pull out a cigarette and wait and see who got to her first. I was fast and on my toes and offered a bit of performance art along with a light.

    the same was for a knife. It was a multiuse tool and even the lady teachers would just wait and see which boy was fastest to pop out a blade if she needed something opened. I carried a Buck knife in my hip pocket and could snap it open lightning fast onehanded.

    The good old days on the hunt and on point for the ladies.
     
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  12. Max rigger

    Max rigger Expert Member
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    Fuel leakage is the number one weak spot for zippo's, I have one in a drawer but I've not taken it out on a camp for maybe ten years now. Bic style lighters just work better, simple as that.
     
  13. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    Zippo's can explode if they are overfilled, I know cos it happened to me, I gave up smoking in 1995 I just have disposable lighters for prepping purposes now.
     
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