A List Of Skills For Long Term Wilderness Living/Survival.

Discussion in 'Wilderness' started by Keith H., Jun 16, 2016.

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  1. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Woodsrunner’s Skills.

    New England Colonial Living History Group 1680-1760.

    This is a list of basic skills in which we expect an 18th century woodsman or woods-woman to have some experience with in our group. There is no time limit set, learn in your own time & if we can help just ask.
    Keith.


    · Flint & steel fire lighting

    · Wet weather fire lighting

    · Fire-bow fire lighting

    · Flintlock fire lighting

    · Flintlock use, service & repair

    · Marksmanship with either gun or bow.

    · Field dressing & butchering game

    · Blade sharpening

    · Tomahawk throwing

    · Making rawhide

    · Brain tanning

    · Primitive shelter construction

    · How to stay warm in winter with only one blanket

    · Cordage manufacture

    · Moccasin construction and repair

    · Sewing

    · Axe and tomahawk helve making

    · Fishing

    · Hunting

    · Evasion

    · Tracking

    · Reading sign

    · Woods lore

    · Navigation

    · Primitive trap construction & trapping

    · Open fire cooking

    · Fireplace construction

    · Clothing manufacture

    · Drying meat & other foods

    · Knowledge of plant tinders & preparation

    · Knowledge of native foods & preparation

    · Knowledge of native plants in the area and their uses for other than tinder and food.

    · Scouting/Ranging.

    · Basic first aid.

    · Finding and treating water.

    · General leather work.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2017
  2. Scott Hobbs

    Scott Hobbs New Member
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    Just came across this useful list, looks like a mountain for a noobie, but to climb a mountain you have to take a first step.

    Any advice on which to tackle first. Ideally some things that can be possibly actioned at home. Some obviously are not possible, but I will tackle what I can here then hopefully seek ways to action the ones I cannot.

    Thanks in advance

    Scott

    UK
     
    Keith H. likes this.
  3. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    FIRE!! Learn to make fire in as many different ways as you can. This is a multilevel skill. Starting with a spark or ember and then building from that small beginning. The most important part is that super fine tinder that so many novices have a hard time finding or making. without this necessary ingredient sparks are just tiny lights and not precursors to fire. Tinder is easier. You just remember that you start small and get bigger as you build your fire. This like any skill must first be learned and then practiced until it is almost instinctive and your understanding of each part is complete and in detail.
     
  4. Scott Hobbs

    Scott Hobbs New Member
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    Thankyou
     
  5. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I think that I learnt fire lighting first at a very young age, about 4 years old I recall. Next came hunting & trapping. I agree with the previous replies, start from the top of the list & work your way through it. If you get stuck on one because of time & place, move on the the next one & so on.
    Making fire without the aid of modern gadgets is a very important skill to learn. If I can be of any assistance Scott, just ask. If you go to the All Resources About Fire board you will find a lot of my posts & videos on primitive fire lighting.
    Keith.
    If you are interested you will find my book details here: http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/2017/06/18th-century-period-fire-lighting.html
     
  6. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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  7. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    Other stuff I keep in my SUV, I'll list below. I often find myself up in the mountains scouting roads to see if my maps are accurate. Guess what, maps are NOT kept up to date, so you'd better check a route long before you will need it. I do this very thing and have many a time discovered that a "road" on a map is in reality now just a hiking path complete with a big gate, chain, and lock -- maybe with bolt cutters, a fine 4 x 4, and lots of luck one could make it down through there, otherwise just forget trying to get a vehicle through there save for a mountain bike. The latter situation I discovered just six months back when scouting a path over some rugged mountains. One will find roads that are private, certainly not public, and which have "No Trespassing" signs that you had better observe -- many folk who live way back in nowheresville will clean your clock, have zero sense of humor about trespassers.

    > vetted maps
    > several lengths of high quality rope
    > length of chain
    > hooks and carabiners
    > winch if you can afford one; just a come-along can get you out of a minor situation
    > short shovel, I keep a military folding shovel
    > fire starting devices/materials
    > basic tools, to include a heavy hammer
    > crowbar (as big as you can find space)
    > a short axe (long hatchet)
    https://www.lowes.com/pd/Estwing-Camp-Axe-with-26-in-Handle/3028060
    > a change of clothes and heavy-duty rain parka
    > Good to have citizens band walkie talkie(s) with as much range as you can afford (have multiple power sources 12v and batteries) -- with license, GMRS or FRS. Don't count on your cell phone getting service, especially up in mountainous regions or way out in desert areas. If you are waaaaaaaaaaaay out there, think about having a short wave receiver / xmitter. One of my sons knows shortwave / Ham radio; I do not.
    > first aid kit with blood coagulating emergency pack, like Quickclot
    > The military has been saving a bunch of lives with these handy tourniquets
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072HR1YX...t=&hvlocphy=9008851&hvtargid=pla-349838826208

    The list above sounds huge, however it isn't. Now I will say this, my SUV toolbox is Big, difficult to lift, but I can put that in and take it out without herniating myself. There are a whole lot of outdoors enthusiasts out there, many of them ex-military, so the demand has made manufacturers get efficient with their products.

    I know I've forgotten stuff. Other folk need to mention some items and their manufacturers.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2017
  8. Scott Hobbs

    Scott Hobbs New Member
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    I will take that idea out next on one of our hikes or find myself drawn to the woodland walk alternative way home. I will try to make a brew with a flint strike made fire. Until I get that done, then try something else next. Maybe after some time I may have a fire bag of many ways.
    Thankyou again for a starting step to get my teeth into.
     
  9. Scott Hobbs

    Scott Hobbs New Member
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    Old Geezer
    As our trecks are getting further away and further off the main road starting point, your SUV box of Kitts will definitely be a consideration to avoid being stuck before we get anywhere. I see a basic bushcraft kitt and SUV get out of sh*t kitt being formed early on now.
    I'm hoping not to get too many or too far ahead without getting vital skills set right.
    As our plan/dream with alot of work and effort, is to eventually have a brain pack of well practiced skills to put them in action when we get off grid in the land, (formentioned Canada) and not to die being stupid or I'll knowledged.

    All fitting in our starter brain so far though.

    Thanks for any advice though, I can always refer at any time if it is something I cannot practice right away.

    Scott
     
  10. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    In order of survival you have the rule of threes. 3 minutes without air, 3 hours without shelter from inclement elements, 3 days without water, three weeks without food and 3 months without any human contact will all place your survival chances in severe peril.

    The fire is part of the shelter thing the other part is the knowledge of how to quickly build yourself some sort of shelter. When you are on your own long term you need to take care of yourself. Being wet and cold or even out in the hot sun for long isn't smart. If you get sick and are alone you may die.

    Once you have whatever level of shelter you need depending on your environment you then need to learn how to find water and purify it. Learn how to make a solar still. Understand that there is water in places that you never have thought about. A sponge to soak up morning dew can provide an amazing amount of water in the early morning for example. Nearly any beach offers you a source of freshwater. Back off the beach a little ways and then dig a hole until you reach the water table. It won't be very far down. Allow the water to slowly fill the bottom of the hole and then carefully drink the water on the very top. Fresh water is lighter than salt water and will float on top.

    Like with the fire making you need to find as many ways to find and get water as possible and then you need to know how to drink it without poisoning yourself. Water is a solvent and will carry within it all manner of chemical and mineral poisons. Then you have all manner of microscopic bacteria and viral dangers and THEN you have waterborne parasites. You can purify or filter most of this out if you just take the time to learn how and gather the tools or supplies you might need.

    Once you have fire, shelter and water only then should you worry about food.
     
  11. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    Before I forget let me add a couple of items: a "space blanket", y'know the aluminum thingy that folds up into a cigarette pack sized unit; a tarp that will fold up into a stowable size.

    Texdanm mentioned water filters. And his sponge idea is dynamite. Me, I keep a charcoal-type filter in my big toolbox. The best is a Katadyn Swiss ceramic filter, but I must admit that I don't keep that with me all the time, its in my gun safe; I think of it as being for family, not just for me, and gosh has its price gone through the roof.

    There's all manner of kit advice online. Good ideas and all. However, your kit must fit the environment into which you are going to travel. You gotta go over in your mind what could go wrong in such places. One example: What sort of extreme temperatures could you run into?

    I read that you and your wife have enjoyed hiking, excellent! Heading Canada way, excellent! How clean Canada! Canadians take care of theirs. I've been there a total of two times, 1960s and latter 1990s (on business, only in city locations). Because I am old, I want to tell you how to live your life and where to live your life. Grandfather's do that. You are in your 40's, my sons are in their 30's. So now I'm going to tell you and your wife to move to Canada.

    Move to Canada because it is beautiful there and the people are reasonably sane (not the situation in most countries around this particular planet). Move to Canada because England is not going to fare well when bad times crash down. Scott, this is going to happen. Open world history books and compare now with those times leading up to wars ... we are there. I can see the sky over the horizon lit with the flames of war, the flames of funeral pyres. Get your wife out of England and quickly. Let me tell you, 45 is still young. Don't you ever tell yourself, "Gosh, I'm already well into my life and big changes are in my past ...". Since age 45, I can't even begin to tell you all the changes I've been through, the moves I've made, the career changes I've made. And I'm not dead yet.

    Change your life to give your mind room to grow. I store my memories in the places I have lived. More experiences/places, the more room in my mind. Canada is big -- Pacific to Atlantic big. You can find the environment you enjoy best. Is that true of England? Escape England before it takes a body-blow, possibly a fatal blow. Canada ain't dying anytime soon.

    Visit Canada. Scout Canada. Think about living where you can still be a part of life as exists now and in the future. This is a survival site. You wouldn't have visited here unless you are intrinsically a survivor. There are decades ahead of you. You will never get them back. Grow your soul. Grow as much as you can while here, else you will have nothing to take with you into the worlds that are yet to come.
     
  12. watcherchris

    watcherchris Expert Member
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    Hey Olde Geezer,

    A question for you about that stuff you referenced called "Quickfire."

    Do you keep it in your vehicles year round...the matches you referenced as well?? I refer in particular to during the summer months when it can get very hot I a vehicle. Around here up to 125 degrees F.

    That is in particular a concern of mine.....ambient heat transfer or is it spontaneous ignition??

    I keep with me a small jar of Vaseline as well as several inexpensive disposable lighters in my Daily BOB as well as a magnifying glass ...another folding version in my pocket daily.

    But I have never heard of this material you reference called quickstart. Where do you find/obtain it....??

    I am curious in particular as to how it fares in a vehicle under high temps...as the inside of a vehicle can get to cooking so to speak in the summer months.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
     
  13. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    I guess a good test would be to put one of these Quickfire packs in a stove at around 200 deg.F and see if the puppy lights up. According to a marketing person of theirs, they've had some military sales. One marketing outlet says that the flammable material is an wax that has been chemically altered -- I don't believe this. Quickfire co. doesn't say that. Wax simply can't burn as hot as these packs and these packs do burn HOT.

    Here's one place to buy Quickfire, however I've seen it marketed on multiple websites:
    https://www.vat19.com/item/quickfire-all-purpose-fire-starters

    If you do a web search for competitors with similar products, there are several. I've seen comparison tables. I like Quickfire's long shelf life and its burn time. I've lit fires in my fireplace with this and its flame lasts a few minutes, which is surprising because there just isn't enough fuel in there to burn that long yet it does. You'll not light logs with it.

    "Quick start" I don't remember mentioning, but Duraflame makes "quick start" logs to get your fireplace logs lit. I've used these when I'm lazy ... and I sure can be lazy.

    Enviro-Log makes this very flammable wax they pour into paper cups. These cups are a shot-glass sized cup like franchise restaurants provide for you to put ketchup and mustard into. The paper itself is flammable such that you can light these. The flame of these last a good long time (15 minutes, maybe 20), however I doubt that they have a long shelf life, the ability to be submerged under water and not be damaged, nor the ability to burn horribly hot. I use them in my fireplace, but wouldn't take them out for wilderness activities.

    Me, I'm an American, I'm looking for better tools all the time. Spent innumerable hours lighting fires in my life, especially when I was young. Therefore efficient fire-starting ideas appeal to me.
     
  14. watcherchris

    watcherchris Expert Member
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    Thanks Olde Geezer for that information.

    It is not carried here in local stores like bass pro and such...wall mart.....but I will find out where to get it. No hurry.

    Good idea about putting it in a stove at about 200 degrees. That would be a good test for sure.

    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
     
  15. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    Basically quickfire is a paraffin wax wrapped up in a oil based paper bag and as such is not a combustible though it is flammable. That means that if you get it hot it will melt but not burst into flame without a flame to start it. It is a sort of candle that will burn big for up to 10 minutes.

    I make something sort of like this for the fireplace and wood stove. I would collect candle stubs and old candles from garage sales. I would melt them and then mix in sawdust ( I like cedar the best) and cotton dryer lint. The mixture was then poured into cardboard egg crates. When it had cooled and set up I cut it into little cardboard wrapped wax wedges each shaped like half and egg. Those things would burn like no tomorrow!! I seldom had to use more than one to start a nice fire.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2018
  16. Scott Hobbs

    Scott Hobbs New Member
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    Thankyou for your wise words. The jump has been. Bee in our bonnet for (strong) for the ok last couple of years, strong enough to break the fear of can I.
    That is why we are on here to make sure our knowledge does not fail when we need it to stay alive and healthy. We have given ourselves the year to learn and practice what we can, and put it into Acton.
    Escape the parasitic world that forces debt and control on other people's lives.

    A return to basic deliberate living is essential. Canada is beautiful and spacious but i/we are not so excited that we make the mistake of running before we can walk.

    Looking forward to tick boxes.
    Went out looking for flint stones to practice flint lighting.
    It's tough to get a spark. Maybe try with better tinder.
     
  17. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    OK, here is the thing about the flint and steel where understanding is critical. The way that it works is not that the "flint" sparks rather it is the steel that makes the sparks. You need a piece of properly hardened HIGH carbon steel. The flint is chipped such that it has a fairly sharp edge or corner. When you strike the edge of the flint with the striker steel it shaves off super thin pieces of metal that are basically almost molten from the heat caused by the friction. The carbon in the steel ignites and that is the "spark".

    If you take several pieces of steel to a grinder you can tell the difference between high carbon steel and a lower carbon steel by the volume of sparks that the grinder throws. A rock grinder is doing exactly the same thing that you are doing on a smaller scale with your flint rock and striker steel. The high carbon steel has to be hardened so that the stone doesn't just slice it off. It has to be rubbed off under a lot of friction pressure to get the best sparks.

    With the proper steel and a sharp piece of flint the sparks actually last longer than you would imagine and will sort of bounce around. You catch those sparks on some sort of tinder and presto you have fire. When I'm using old school flint and steel I usually have char cloth that I make just for that purpose.

    Personally I like the ferrocerium rods. They basically have all of this stuff with a little magnesium in one piece. When you strike it with a piece of steel the sparks that it makes are more copious and hotter than the ones from flint and steel alone. The method and process is about the same but many times more forgiving. I use jute twine, toilet paper and or dryer lint for quick light fires. Once you get good with that the flint and steel seems to come easier or at least it did for me.

    You can sometimes get sparks from striking two rocks together but honestly I have never managed to get these sparks to catch and take. It may require some special sort of iron pirite or something that we don't have here. Has anyone out there had any better luck from just striking rocks together?

    Kieth is the pro here with the flint and steel and has a video on it somewhere around here.
     
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