Acquiring Salt In A Primitive Environment

Discussion in 'Finding, Identifying, and Preparing Food' started by randyt, Jul 4, 2019.

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  1. randyt

    randyt Expert Member
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    Last March I visited the Museum of Appalachia . There are exhibits of salt boiling pots. There are also place names with lick included in the name. I'm assuming these places have salt water and that is where salt was acquired.

    Any thoughts on producing salt in a post SHTF situation? The usual places come to mind, the ocean, The great salt lake, but are there other locations.
     
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  2. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Expert Member
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    Great question. Subscribed for any good answers.
     
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  3. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Never seen one but I do believe there are salt mines.
     
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  4. randyt

    randyt Expert Member
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    There is a huge salt mine under Detroit but I'm not sure if it was accessible back during colonial times.

    I have heard that burned hickory bark can be used as a salt seasoning substitute.
     
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  5. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    In America you have salt springs, what is called salt licks, the local wildlife go to these places when they need salt. In the 18th century teams of people from the local forts & settlements would go to these licks with a string of horses & large cooking kettles. The kettles would be filled with the salty water & then boiled down. The salt placed into bags & loaded on the horses.
    https://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/2016/03/carrying-salt.html
    https://explorekyhistory.ky.gov/items/show/476
    "We found everywhere abundance of wild beasts of all sorts, through this vast forest. The buffalo were more frequent than I have seen cattle in the settlements, browsing on the leaves of the cane, or cropping the herbage on those extensive plains, fearless, because ignorant of the violence of man. Sometimes we saw hundreds in a drove, and the numbers about the salt springs were amazing." [Daniel Boone Settles Kentucky by Daniel Boone (1734-1820)]
    https://bullittcountyhistory.org/bchistory/salt.html
    http://www.virginiaplaces.org/geology/salt.html
    Salt Boilers & Salt Licks.

    Late in the year 1777 the Virginia government sent out several large salt-boiling kettles for the use of the Western settlers. Both residents and visiting militiamen were allotted into companies, which were to relieve each other at salt-making until sufficient was manufactured to last the several stations for

    a year. It was Boone's duty to head the first party, thirty strong, which, with the kettles packed on horses, went to Lower Blue Licks early in January.

    A month passed, during which a considerable quantity of salt was made; several horse-loads had been sent to Boonesborough, but most of it was still at the camp awaiting shipment. The men were daily expecting relief by

    the second company, when visitors of a different character appeared. While half of the men worked at the boiling, the others engaged in the double service of watching for Indians and obtaining food ; of these was Boone. Toward evening of the seventh of February he was returning home from a

    wide circuit with his packhorse laden with buffalo-meat and some beaver-skins, for he had many traps in the neighborhood. A blinding snow-storm was in progress, which caused him to neglect his usual precautions, when suddenly he was confronted by four burly Shawnese, who sprang from an ambush. Keen of foot, he thought to outrun them, but soon had to surrender, for they shot so accurately that it was evident that they could kill him if they would.
    https://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/2019/07/salt-boilers-salt-licks.html
     
  6. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    no salt licks or pans here, I think you would have to boil sea water to get salt.
     
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  7. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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    salt is important....and yes it will run out..any measured amount of anything will eventually....be it stored goods you buy or natural formations in the ground. i know of several mines that are closed to the product being 'mined out'...so what ya do...

    i know of one salt deposit in my area but not sure if its played out or not. salt was so important its where our term salary comes from..heard the expression worth your weight in salt.salt was used as currency back in the day.

    blah blah..read more here...

    Salt
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt

    so what do you do...salt is so cheap now...store it........i think last morton salt 50# bag was $8 i bought....so a few hundred pounds is nothing...if you have livestock you need much more...here in my area we use to have a salt truck that delivered various types of salts to each farm...the guy aged out on us and no one does it anymore.they just get it at local farm store now. i know guys keep 1000# on hand at all times its so important.

    edit...i just looked and seen 50# for $5.91 with minum purchase of 49 bags...so 2450# of salt for $289.59

    i keep various types of salt...the very best tasting is Himalayan salt..it has all the minerals in it...its very expensive though. but i keep 25# or so of it at all times.

    i dont live close to ocean and i dont want to travel in a shtf so a few dollars i am good for awhile.

    you are either serious or not....this is a top shelf priority item.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2019
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  8. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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  9. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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  10. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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    Ponds near Maras, Peru, fed from a mineral spring and used for salt production since the time of the Incas.

    136ccdb3784ccfd6c78429de502c12ef.jpeg
     
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  11. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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  12. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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  13. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    upon checking there are some salt pans in Cumbria, Northern England.
     
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  14. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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  15. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    I camped once close to a salt lick on a solo bear hunt in Idaho . It was a seeping water spring that most would not have recognized for what it was . I knew animals were visiting the spring but I didn't know what it was until I found a plaque by a road side about a quarter mile from the spring . According to the plaque in the 1800s a hunting party came through a pass from Helena Montana to hunt close to the salt licks . in a remote area of Idaho . IT was still remote when I was there .. I camped there by the road and the sweet water river for three days and only one vehicle came down that road in that three days . It was the creepest place I had ever camped . I just had an erie feeling about that place . Then one day I found the plaque about fifty yards from my camp . In the 1800's hunting party was a guy named Colgate . He became sick and couldn't ride his horse back to Montana . The snow came and trapped them from reentering the mountain pass . They built a raft and tried to float down the river to a town called White Bird a distance of at least a hundred miles . The river rocks broke up their raft and the raft attempt to float Colgate out failed . They left Colgate on the river bank and rode their horses to White Bird to spend the winter . The next spring Colgate's remains was found on the river bank and was buried about fifty yards from my tent . Even though I had a creepy feeling even before learning this " me and Colgate got along just fine " .
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2019
  16. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Expert Member
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    Just spoke to Lot's wife while loading salt in the well house reservoir.

    A 40 pound bag of Morton's costs $6 at Walmart. The cost went up - if I even need to mention rising costs.
     
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