Comfort Equipment.

Discussion in 'Essential Items' started by Keith H., Dec 23, 2016.

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  1. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Forest Sentinels By Todd Price.
    Comfort Equipment.

    Definition of Paleolithic. Of or relating to the earliest period of the Stone Age characterized by rough or chipped stone implements. Merriam Webster Dictionary.

    Humans have been surviving for thousands of years, back in the Paleolithic period life was hard, even so these people must have had some creature comforts, perhaps local flora placed on their beds to make it softer and keep them up off the ground. Tools were very basic being made of wood, stone bone, horn or antler, and yet these people survived.

    Make no mistake, most of the equipment we carry today is for comfort, to make life easier, but we could survive as a people without the equipment we carry. Some items I deem essential, a good medical kit for instance. But as for the rest, no it is not a necessity, just a preference. So why all this modern so called “survival gear”? Does it add to our comfort? In some cases perhaps, but it also has drawbacks. Take the sleeping bag for instance. Great until it gets wet, then it will not retain as much of your body heat as an ordinary pure wool blanket! I am not going to list all the fancy gadgets here that are basically designed to attract people that like gadgets, people that have no real sense of what is needed to survive long term in a wilderness situation. But I would like you to think about this. Every time you add a piece of equipment to your pack, ask yourself these questions: Do I need this? Is this piece of equipment sustainable? If it breaks can I fix it? Will this piece of equipment serve a needed purpose, or is it just taking up room where I could be carrying something else that is more important, such as water, food and ammunition?

    Think about the tools that you carry or are about to purchase, think about their purpose. The knife, what is it used for? Skinning and butchering game, and for defence; Is the blade long enough for defence use? Can I kill with this blade or is it too short? The axe, used for many tasks that involve the cutting and shaping of wood as well as for defence and possibly needed for hunting. How easy would it be to replace a broken helve? How heavy is it? Can I use the poll as a hammer to drive stakes into the ground? And so on and so on. Your equipment needs to be versatile & sustainable, it needs to be able to perform the function that it’s namesake was originally designed for. Paleolithic flint knives were not used for cutting down small trees; they made flint hand axes for that purpose. In today’s modern world of survival equipment manufacturers seem to have forgotten this common sense approach that those primitive people in the Paleolithic took for granted. Think about that, your life may depend on it!
    Keith.
    ( Taken From: http://australiansurvivalandpreppers.blogspot.com.au/2016/12/httpwww.html)
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2017
  2. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    My old military sleeping bag is waterproof very warm and very comfy. You can roll it out in snow crawl in and never notice its 20 below. Only thing i disagree with keith
     
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  3. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Comfort is important, in fact most of what I carry is for comfort & ease of living. However, you do have to be careful what you put in your pack. An inflatable pillow may not weigh much or take up much room, but it does weigh a little & it does take up some room. There are more important items that need to be in your pack. I use my knapsack as a pillow. Remember, when packing for the trail, you need to make a compromise between two principles: minimum weight & maximum self-reliance.
    Items that have a dual purpose are best.
    Keith.
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