Do you have a marketable skill?

Discussion in 'Essential Items' started by cluckeyo, Jun 5, 2016.

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  1. cluckeyo

    cluckeyo Well-Known Member
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    This is important regardless of the situation, but one thing that would be very valuable after an economic collapse, would be to have a skill that could be used for barter. Can you build things, can you sew, can you cook, can you cut hair? Or maybe you have even a more specialized skill? It may be the thing that gets you through the toughest of times. A very valuable asset.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2016
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  2. FuZyOn

    FuZyOn Expert Member
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    I don't know how marketable any of those skills are but I'm a swiss army knife when it comes to housing and technology. I know how to fix most of the problems you can encounter in your house and I have a wide variety of skills like plumbing, building, cooking, carpenting, building a fountain, pavement and the list goes on and on. I'm also a decent hunter and a great fisherman.
     
  3. cluckeyo

    cluckeyo Well-Known Member
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    Will you marry me?? lol;)
     
  4. Valerie

    Valerie Active Member
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    Marketable skills, eh? I suppose being a language teacher and dancer, as well as a nutritionist and bartender could come in handy with the collapse of civilization...
    I mean, we could all use a drink and some entertainment when that happens haha.
     
  5. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Yes I suppose I have, I am a primitive skills instructor. But of how much use this would be to me in such a situation I really don't know.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHEOMSZJETfj3GnoyONuvCQ?view_as=public

    These are just some of the skills that I posses & teach to others:
    Keith.

    Woodsrunner’s Skills.

    New England Colonial Living History Group 1680-1760.

    This is a list of basic skills in which we expect an 18th century woodsman or woods-woman to have some experience with in our group. There is no time limit set, learn in your own time & if we can help just ask.
    Keith.


    · Flint & steel fire lighting

    · Wet weather fire lighting

    · Fire-bow fire lighting

    · Flintlock fire lighting

    · Flintlock use, service & repair

    · Marksmanship with either gun or bow.

    · Field dressing & butchering game

    · Blade sharpening

    · Tomahawk throwing

    · Making rawhide

    · Brain tanning

    · Primitive shelter construction

    · How to stay warm in winter with only one blanket

    · Cordage manufacture

    · Moccasin construction and repair

    · Sewing

    · Axe and tomahawk helve making

    · Fishing

    · Hunting

    · Evasion

    · Tracking

    · Reading sign

    · Woods lore

    · Navigation

    · Primitive trap construction & trapping

    · Open fire cooking

    · Fireplace construction

    · Clothing manufacture

    · Drying meat & other foods

    · Knowledge of plant tinders & preparation

    · Knowledge of native foods & preparation

    · Knowledge of native plants in the area and their uses for other than tinder and food.

    · Scouting/Ranging.

    · Basic first aid.

    · Finding and treating water.

    · General leather work.
     
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  6. lexinonomous

    lexinonomous Member
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    I am so glad that you mentioned cutting hair because I am a cosmetology student. In a time of crisis, I would be able to offer people a break from time to time. I can cut hair, provide nail services, color hair, and perform massage and facials. I'd like to think that these skills are useful when it comes to people needing to take a step back from the crisis. I wouldn't mind offering these services to people during a disaster. It's somewhat therapeutic for me, releasing tension from others.
     
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  7. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    In a time of survival with less water I would be cutting my hair back to just a scalp lock. We have an old pair of manual clippers, & of course scissors, but of course you can also use a knife & clam shells & wood ash to remove hair.
    Keith.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2016
  8. Arkane

    Arkane Master Survivalist
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    I think my most marketable skill will be letting one live, payment will be variable!:D
     
  9. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I have long hair and a full beard and they will be staying post SHTF, I have saved a fortune on hair cuts and shaving accessories over the last 30 years!:D
    not that I will be bartering but some of my skills are: gardener, grower, shooter, archer, forester, coppicer, hand sewer, bow and arrow maker, basic carpentry skills, cook, scout , tracker, but my main skill is as a SCAVENGER.
     
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  10. westcoastcanuck

    westcoastcanuck Well-Known Member
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    For 33 years I was a paramedic, ground ambulance, bike squad special events and flight medic. Minor and major trauma, medical emergencies with appropriate drug administration and my least favourite.....child birth!
     
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  11. SSG Nasty

    SSG Nasty Well-Known Member
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    I used to think that most people have many useful skills that will come in handy in and out of bad times.

    Then I started meeting people with no clue about much of anything - simple things like wall switch cover replacement (not kidding), minor skills like patching a hole in the wall, changing belts on cars or other equipment, plumbing repairs/replacement, changing brake pads. Today's society tends to call repairmen or simply buy a replacement.
     
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  12. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I totally agree, but the other aspect of having done this work yourself is, that when faced with a task that you have no experience with, you can usually work it out.
    Keith.
     
  13. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    people today are not used to doing anything themselves, even to putting a handle on a broom or a handle of a spade or hammer, they just go out and buy a new one.
    as for work about the place, everyone is now a specialist, what we need are "jack of all trades" and not "a master of one", if anything needs doing they "G.S.I." GET SOMEONE IN! my dad was an accountant but he could grow most of our own food, resole a pair of shoes and develop his own photos, now nobody does these things anymore.
     
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  14. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Sadly this is true, except for the older generation perhaps.
    Keith.
     
  15. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I am a bit of the old world Jack of all trades and have made a living doing all manner of skilled and on occasion unskilled trades. I am and have worked professionally in no special order a carpenter, a roofer, a mechanic, a machinist, a gunsmith, an electrician, a plumber, a licensed AC/Heater tech, a welder, a painter, a writer, a poet, a pool hustler, a bouncer... For the last 25 years I've owned and operated an appliance/AC and home repair business. For hobbies I reload, do leather work, braiding in paracord and leather, Garden, Remodeling, wood carving, Indian bead work, hunting (but seldom killing), fishing, camping, sewing (canvass and leather stuff mostly). I am also a bit of a chemist and mad scientist in some areas not all of which were always strictly legal. (NEVER DRUGS!) I can make three different kinds of gunpowder and other such chemically based creations. No warm blooded critters 2 legged or 4 legged have ever been harmed by my experiments I just liked loud bangs and sometimes home made booze when I was a kid.

    I have three separate buildings for the various crafts. One has a metal lathe, milling machine, drill press, stick welder, wire fed tig welder and Ox& Acetylene tanks. I also have a wood working machines, table saw, band saw, compound slid miter saw, wood lathe and various grinders and belt type sanding,grinding machines. A separate building is for reloading, leather work, wood carving, rod wrapping and fly tying type things. My wife has her own shop for painting and craft items. Along with the three shops I have two pole buildings for mech work and outdoor work.. I'm thinking about a forge for knife making. In the past I have made a lot of knives but not from the forge.

    I like working with my hands and always have. I guess I'm just a blue collar type and don't like offices. I picked up trades without much effort mostly because I have a sort of trick memory in that if you show me something once I usually have it and while I don't have a lot of formal education I am sharp and can learn or figure out almost anything with books. I am self-educated and self taught from hands on learning. I have always loved puzzles so for me a non-functioning machine is just a pretty easy puzzle. My company fixed anything in the home, office, motels and restaurants along with occasional runs at a few bigger things. I literally can repair almost anything except really small engines. They just don't like me and it is mutual. Chain saws and weed-eaters.....GRRRRRR!!! LOL.

    I can, and have the equipment to can my produce and smoke my own meats and was raised country poor and can process animals of all kinds from rabbits and squirrels through chickens, pigs and cattle.

    I'm pretty lucky. I like what I do and while far from rich in the things that most people like to acquire I have the things that I value. I currently own 4 vehicles, 2 trucks, a small SUV and a car. All run well but are over 10 years old. I don't own anything with less than 125,00 miles on it. My work truck is past 250,000. Fancy cars don't excite me. big houses aren't my thing. nor are clothes and jewelry. My money is in tools and big boy toys like boats, guns and machines. My time for most of my life has been spent making and fixing things both for a living and pleasure. I don't watch a lot of TV but do seem to spend a lot of time on this lap top. I guess my OCD about tools and crafts is also in my info gathering. I'm an info junkie both in paper form and online.

    I would be pretty handy after an apocalypse Even if I lost my tools the knowledge is still there and that is all that is irreplaceable.
     
  16. Arkane

    Arkane Master Survivalist
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    Wonderful day today!
    Had a 24vdc bus with a flat battery(s) two young adults with two 4wd vehicles and no idea how to start the bus!

    I bet them $50 each that I could start the bus in under 15 minutes, they took the bet!
    I got both 4wd's within jumper lead range disconnected the lead joining the two 12v batteries and hooked both up seperatly to charge each battery!

    After 10 minutes on charge I disconnected the jumper leads and reconnected the joining cable and cranked the bus over enough to start it
    all in 13 minutes !
    I am now $100 richer and they are a little wiser!:D
    Could have done it with just one 4wd but it would have taken longer!
     
  17. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    24 volt systems are great. It lets you use smaller wire without giving up wattage power. I used to have a 24 volt trolling motor and charged it up that same way. It is usually faster than using a single 24 volt charger. Good one! KNOWLEDGE is a powerful thing. They had the tools but YOU had the knowledge! That is priceless. Without your knowledge they had nothing.
     
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