Do you know how to cook outdoors?

Discussion in 'Cooking and Cooking Utensils' started by cluckeyo, Jun 17, 2016.

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  1. cluckeyo

    cluckeyo Well-Known Member
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    You can begin with a simple pot belly grill that you get for under $20 at Walmart. Go to YouTube and watch videos that teach you how to light the charcoal and allow it to burn down. Practice with lesser priced cuts of meat. Soon you will be a pro. It's a place to start.
     
  2. Endure

    Endure Expert Member
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    Yeah, is quite simple to light a fire with flammable fuel, a box of matches and charcoal. Then put a steel grill and an Iron Cast cooking pot. But no need to look for another youtube videos, Keith already post here a video showing how to properly set a bonfire with tinderbox and kindling.
     
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  3. willywonka

    willywonka Member
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    I do! My family has been going camping ever since I was really young and I would always help out with starting a fire, smothering a fire and with the cooking duties. I was a true fire bug so I had fun looking for things to start up a fire and kind of know what is and what isn't good for kindling a flame. I learned early on how to treat it like a baby and blow on it to get a nice fire going.
     
  4. OfTheEarth

    OfTheEarth Member
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    Yep! Just gotta secure the food from pests and the wind, everything else is pretty straightforward. All you really need is a bunch of sticks and rocks, but it helps to have little things here and there to make your life easier of course :)
     
  5. joshposh

    joshposh Expert Member
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    If you know how to cook in a regular kitchen, you should be able to cook outdoors. An oven or hot plate is the heat source. A barbecue or fire pit is a heat source. If anyone can't figure that one on their own, then they are morons.

    Knowing how to start a fire and waiting for the colas to be at the right temperature and height, is another story.
     
  6. ZipMedia

    ZipMedia New Member
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    Armenians have developed a pretty efficient way to cook meat on skewers outdoors quite efficiently. Although, in this case, you want to make sure they aren't flammable. Creating an encased grill with homemade charcoal shouldn't be too difficult, and not only can it be used as a stove, but it can also function for many other different assets.
     
  7. kgord

    kgord Active Member
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    YOu can also hand a pot and cook over an open fire that way. There are all sorts of utensils you can use when the budget it limited, and traditional implements are scarce. Camping stores are full of such things. I think your imagination could be your guide with some of these things.
     
  8. Bishop

    Bishop Master Survivalist
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    Kelly kettle comes in really handy
     
  9. Corzhens

    Corzhens Master Survivalist
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    If you mean by outdoor is a picnic then the griller is my choice. We often cook barbecue when we go to the mountain resort. And barbecue means meat or fish. That kind of cooking is the most appropriate when you are outdoors. But when in the wilderness where you don't have charcoal and iron grill to hold the food, it is broiling with the use of big stones for the stove. The side of the big stone can serve as the cooking area where you can place whatever food you will cook. The heat of the fire will be absorbed by the stone and in turn will cook the food. By the way, you need small branches for the fuel. Twigs are not recommended.
     
  10. BethSztruhar

    BethSztruhar Member
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    Cooking outdoors is our jam. Me and my family do it weekly or at least monthly if the weather is good. It's kind of a tradition for us and we really enjoy it and I think it's pretty easy. It have it's own unique atmosphere. I prefer cooking outside than inside but unfortunately it's not always possible.
    We usually make goulash (it's a famous Hungarian soup) and grill meats and vegetables.
     
  11. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    When I was a kid we would take my Grandmother "picnicking" and she would cook an entire meal over an open fire on the ground. Fried chicken, potato salad and beans along with a pie cooked in a dutch oven. She just loved doing this and we did it almost every labor day and 4th of July. She was born in the late 1800s and said that some of her favorite memories of her family and childhood revolved around camping and cooking like that. She wanted to share that with us and did.
     
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  12. kgord

    kgord Active Member
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    Outdoor cooking doesn't have to be that complicated. A pointed stick and a fire will do under primitive conditions. There are a variety of camp stoves that can be used as well. Another thing is making solar ovens out of card board boxes and aluminum foil. I haven't tried this but i think it works. I have heard of people burying a pot of beans in the sand to keep them warm as well
     
  13. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Outdoor cooking is actually pretty easy. You don't do a six course meal. All that you really need is a fire and something to cook in. My Great great cooked every meal he ate for two years during the Civil War in a little one and a half quart pot with three little legs. I've cooked many meals on an open fire with my old boy scout mess kit. You just don't get fancy. Throw in a little grill, mine is 9" X 12" and you can set the pots on it or grill meat on it. Meat on sticks works well as long as you go slow and don't set your sticks on fire.

    The human body is an amazing and massively adaptable thing. While we lack claws, fangs, speed, strength or even thick skin or fur we do have a body that can go through nearly anything. A man on foot can run down a horse. We can eat almost anything. When food isn't available our metabolism slows and we can easily go a couple of weeks with nothing.

    You just need to go to a flea market and find a boy scout mess kit and then start picnicking. At first just warm your canned chili for hot-dogs on the fire. Then, as you learn how to control your fire you can expand. You cook over coals not blazing fires so take your time and establish your bed before you start cooking. I always liked cooking breakfast. Fry the bacon then fry the eggs in the bacon grease then I made gravy with the grease for bread or biscuits that I had brought or cooked in a dutch oven.

    For survival you need to cook in a pot a lot more than you do on a grill or stick. The fat that drips off broiling meat is something that you WANT and in a pot you don't lose it. As your confidence grows you might want to ad a legged dutch oven. It is about the ultimate camping cooking pot. It has legs and a lid that is flanged so that you can put coals on top to bake in it. A big thinner walled kettle is nice too. It allows you to cook bigger meals and to boil a gallon or more of water at a time for drinking.

    Like most things it is just a matter of going out and learning. Don't be discouraged if at first your efforts aren't perfect. There is a learning curve and a lot of little tricks like smearing soap on the bottom of the pots before you put them on the fire to make cleaning them later a lot easier. In the end it is a lot of fun and is something that you want to share with your kids. Weenie roasts followed by marshmallows and smores is great fun for kids.
     
  14. omegaman

    omegaman Expert Member
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    Ive been working as a wilderness guide for 12 years and my only cooking utensil when Im alone is a stainless cup and a wooden kåsa for water. In my army days I was made to carry around so much stuff it took the joy out of the hike.
     
  15. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    The US canteen with the cup nested on the little stove all tucked in to the canteen cover with the water purification pills in that little pouch is a great very basic one man mess kit. Cook in it and then drink out of it and you don't even have to have a spoon.
     
  16. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I thought when you put that heading to this post you were referring to cooking over an open fire, not just cooking on a stove outside. What is the difference between cooking indoors & cooking outdoors if you are cooking on a stove?
    Keith.
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    Last edited: Jul 13, 2017
  17. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    When it comes to survival since I bugged in I'm quite happy to say that I will be cooking on a wood burning stove rather than a camp fire. My Eco Zoom rocket stove will boil a couple gallons of water in a hurry with a handful of twigs. During the winter the cast iron wood stove will be nice for heat and cooking. Cooking on the ground is for picnicking, camping or while you are on the move. As soon as you settle down you will want to build a hearth with a cover and flue and maybe an oven. I always carry a piece of chain so I can hang a pot over the fire when I am camping and then build a tripod. Where I grew up there were no rocks but if there are rocks it is a lot easier. The native Americans that lived in southeast Texas nearer the coast used silver dollar size scales and such for arrow heads and edges. There just aren't many rocks in a swamp.
     
  18. jeager

    jeager Master Survivalist
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    I did when younger.
    Mostly when fishing.
    I'd clean a fish, make a fire, skewer fish
    on a stick and cook it.
    A bit of salt makes it better.
     
  19. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    One of the secrets to cooking a good steak on a grill is to let it sit out and come to near room temperature before putting it on the grill. I like to Put a little salt, pepper and Worcestershire on it for a couple of hours before cooking too. There are all sort of rubs and mixes that you can try. The big thing is to have your coals nice and hot and then cook it fast on both sides. How long depends on how hot your fire is and how you like your steak. At first a good meat thermometer in nice until you learn exactly how long it take for each level of done.
     
  20. jeager

    jeager Master Survivalist
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    I do well enough with the grill but I think learning
    to cook over a campfire would be a good skill.
    About the only campfire food I cook is a hot dog
    wrapped in bacon.
    The ONLY way to enjoy a hot dog.
    Campfire cooking well is an art I think.
     
  21. overcast

    overcast Member
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    I have learned some of the recipes from the cooking shows in YouTube. Most of the videos on the cooking show have the recipe which can be done outdoor cooking. You can follow Almazan Kitchen on YouTube. They have some of the best YouTube videos on outdoor cooking. They also show you the process of doing herbs and other stuff. That being said, it an be good experience to learn from those channels. And more you go out and apply those skills it'd get easier.
     
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