Does anyone recommend a premade survival kit or a diy one?

Discussion in 'Survival Kits' started by branchd77, Jan 17, 2016.

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  1. branchd77

    branchd77 Administrator Staff Member Gold Supporter
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    Does anyone know a good website where you can buy a premade survival kit or is it always best to make one yourself?
     
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  2. Rick Cahill

    Rick Cahill Active Member
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    I think diy. Premade kits including first aid ones usually contain filler - items not necessarily needed. A diy kit can be tailored to your needs, strong points, and weaknesses. Use google to get a broad overview of what individuals think are important. You need to determine possible scenarios and honestly critique your skills. Every item should have a back up, have multiple uses, and be compact and light. Then practice your skills.
     
  3. Mbrown

    Mbrown Active Member
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    The best kits are DIY. Dave Canterbury has a really good video on YouTube about where to get started on a budget
     
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  4. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    you can get pre made kits on Ebay, very small , fits into a shirt pocket, better than nothing. but if you make your own you can add the items that are your personal requirement which will probably be different to a commercially produced kit.
     
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  5. TheJim

    TheJim Active Member
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    Always home made....ALWAYS.... You know your region, weather, and local flora/fauna (or you should).. Kits are great to have from your standard B.O.B to an E.D.C ( Bug-out-bag / Everyday carry) Vehicle kits, briefcase kits, even as small as wallet kits. Still each and every one better when home made.
     
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  6. Rangerkel

    Rangerkel Active Member
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    I like the Adventure Medical PSK plus kit. I do add a few things but overall a solid small pocket survival kit
     
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  7. Paxxis

    Paxxis Active Member
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    As has been said before, commercially available kits will generally contain items that are simply not needed (or at least, not essential). That said, there are some cases where I can see picking up a premade kit. For instance, I have seen a couple of really nice medical kits out there that have almost everything you might want in a medical bag. If they seem to be lacking a handful of items, it is usually easy enough to add those in. But beyond that, if you are talking about a BOB, or LTSP (Long Term Survival Pack), then always make your own. You know your own needs, as well as those of your family. You also want to customize it for your area. Nothing worse than ordering a kit online, and getting something for the snowy regions of the high mountains, when you live in the lowest part of Arizona. Just sayin'. :)
     
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  8. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I recommend you make your own. Think second hand, there is a lot of good inexpensive stuff out there, but you need to do some research before deciding what you need to get.
    Keith.
     
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  9. acheno84

    acheno84 Member
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    Definitely a DIY, as many others have said. This way, you get to pick what you want in there. Brands and items that you trust, rather than hoping for the best with a mass produced kit. Not to mention, you could probably put one together at a better price than what you could buy it for. Check your local thrift shops for some really great items that would help save you some money.
     
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  10. Prepper 247

    Prepper 247 New Member
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    Diy 100% that way you can try to dual purpose as many items as you can. ALWAYS try to think of as many scenarios as possible. My bag is made up of smaller bags and kits that can be used seperatly in an absolut worst case scenario. Of course as a whole they are much more effective 1 of something is never enough EVERYTHING needs a BACKUP.
     
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  11. Thanez

    Thanez Member
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    Skills skills skills do you have the necessary skills to even utilize what's in a budget kit. Build your skills then buy the tool or equipment and add it to a diy bag. My bag changes with my added skills and level at them. Think modular also. Can you quikly shed some of it to run or fight. Can you get to items readily or have to dig for them. Where will you locate your med kit if you need to drop your gear and run or use it.
     
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  12. Mr Boots

    Mr Boots Expert Member
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    I started off with a permade kit to hav a base to work with (better to hav something to work with than nothing) and started modifying it replacing bits as I came across better quality stuff and had the money to do so I ended up with my own good kit and a spare one that came in handy when I met my gf she used the kit and start replacing it to a better one to suit her and we now hav our own kits and hav a spare one to use or trade with
     
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  13. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Make your OWN kit!! That way you are sure of the quality of the items and you will put in things that you know how to use. So many of the premade and sold kits just aren't of a good quality. Besides each person is different in character, knowledge, skills and situation. Only you can decide what you will be best off having.

    I often make and give little kits for gifts. It is amazing what you can put in a package that is the size of about half a deck of playing cards. I make kits for each car and individual fanny pack sized bags for light kits up to large alice pack sized full on book out, never coming back kits. Each one is tailored to a different purpose and aim.

    You don't have to spend a fortune to put together a nice kit. There are good knives to be had for under 20 dollars. Instead of buying expensive finished stuff you can buy the makings for pennies on the dollar. Buy ferocerium rods on ebay and put your own handle on it and break up a used hacksaw blade for a striker and you have as good as or better then you can buy off the shelf for about 10% to 25% the cost. I buy jute at a dollar store and make it into braided and bundled cords to put it all together and then I have something that will turn a spark into a flame with it. Unravel jute into a little nest of individual fibers and it is almost like gasoline. I get water purification tabs off ebey that are individually wrapped and put them in my kits from pocket sized up depending on how long I expect to be on the move. Buy space blankets in mass. I have a couple of them in every cars, truck, boat and kit. Tape two together and you have a sleeping bag. Tape three of them together and its a tube tent or small tarp.

    The biggest reason to make your own kit though is simple. If you are going to stand a chance of survival, no matter WHAT the disaster is, you will need to prepare ahead of it. The BEST preparation is talking and more important THINKING about what you will need and need to know and then as you gather your kit you need to use the stuff to learn how and what its limitations are. Just playing the "What IF Game" and thinking about what you would need to do in various situations could easily save your life.

    When bad things happen all to often the difference between the QUICK and the DEAD is who moved first. If you've thought of it before and made some of the decisions, when something happens you are in a position to ACT instantly rather than sit there trying to figure out what to do and then FINALLY REact to whats happened. I try to have a basic pocket sized set of survival tools with and on my person at all times. Then I also look around and know what I'm going to do if things go upside down suddenly. If I'm on a plane, I KNOW how many rows of seats are between me and each of the emergency exits. Any store that I go to very often I scope out the emergency exits and back doors. LOL, I almost NEVER sit with my back to the door in a restaurant and usually am near the exit if possible. If I'm with my buddies it is a race to the table to grab the seats with your back to a wall!

    I carry a lot of CASH. This has allowed me to make several great buys and if I am caught out and away from home I can buy the things that I need and don't have even if the power is off. Cash in large sums has a lot of power unto itself over a lot of people.

    Don't let others think for you. If you do you will be waiting for someone to tell you when you should be DOING things! Make your own kits and think hard about what that kit is for and where it will be if you need it! Remember the Quick and the Dead are too often seperated by the actors and the REactors.
     
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  14. sunnytn

    sunnytn Well-Known Member
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    I think a diy survival kit is best, because you can customize it. Also there are different sizes of survival kits you can make. A pocket size survival kit is easy to carry on you, and can be a backup. I think it's probably best to have more than one survival kit of difference sizes. The Urban prepper on youtube has several videos on making survival kits.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2017
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  15. woodchipper518

    woodchipper518 Expert Member
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    DIY because you know your situation best and what you really need to prep for. I like YouTube videos from Dave Canterbury, Urban Prepper and Sensible Prepper / Sootch00 ( same guy 2 channels). Couldn't find the link but Sensible Prepper does one with three variations based on Exposure Level Yellow Orange Red. I currently work 40 miles from home so my EDC bag is more of a BOB since getting home is likely a 72hr trek through some good, bad and nasty suburban Dallas areas. So mine is an Orange level bag. My EDC carry is a 9mm with 150 rounds. For my extended exposure, I also have a AR pistol with 3 mags.

    I bought stuff at Walmart dollar tree dollar general home depot harbor freight. I upgraded as money allowed for better quality stuff.
     
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  16. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Start small working to your strengths and the environment you expect to deal with. It doesn't have to be real expensive all at once. Ask questions here and you will get all the advice you could EVER want.
     
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  17. NKAWTG

    NKAWTG Well-Known Member
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    I think the consensus is DIY.
    You can tailor your survival kit to suit your needs and keep down costs.
     
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  18. NomadWill

    NomadWill Expert Member
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    I would definitely go for a DIY Kit, I've looked and looked for Pre-made kits, but they are usually expensive and never really had 100% of the content I wanted. Plus making your own is super fun.
     
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  19. Maria_C

    Maria_C New Member
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    The different between a premade survival kit and a DIY one is in the quality of things and the availability. The premade almost includes things you will ever need while the DIY most atimes consists of some the of the items one can lay his hands on. You will save cost with DIY kit, though the quality won't be same as the premade. Choose base on your budget and preference.
     
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  20. Ali_q

    Ali_q New Member
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    DIY is the best way to go for this. You will know what you will need. And as others have mentioned most of these premade ones contain unnecessary items. You've been given plenty of good suggestions from Youtube. Also, make a list of essential things you truly need before starting to prepare your bag.
     
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  21. GS AutoTech

    GS AutoTech Expert Member
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    DIY for sure. Using basic guides you can totally customize. Most premade cheap kits I've seen & used are filled with junk.
     
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  22. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Much the same as first aid kits. The basic first aid kit is okay, but you can always improve on its contents.
    Keith.
     
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  23. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    DIY is going to be best because you can create one that suits your specific surroundings, you can also update or alter it to suit your travels. If you're crossing borders or using public transport you must ensure its also all legal to carry
    If a ready made kit gets searched by customs it's often impossible to re-pack it properly but if it's a DIY kit you know how it's all supposed to fit.
     
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  24. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Ok, I just finished making a little kit for a friend so let me tell you about it. I buy the little survival type things off Ebay, usually in small quantities of a dozen at a time to keep the price down. I make and give a lot of these so I nearly always have most of this stuff on hand.

    The start for this little kit is a dollar poncho. I take the paper description label out of the bag and leaving the poncho in I use that little bag to put the kit in. It is just a little bigger than a deck of poker playing cards. That is the size of it. I then tuck in a survival/space blanket that is folded to the same size as the poncho. I fold up some foil and slide that in. I add one of those folding credit card knives. A Fresnel magnifying lens, a couple of needles some thread a couple of buttons and a safety pin, A compressed wash cloth, A couple of band-aids, 2 birthday candles, a compass, a fishing kit with hooks, two different kind of lines, weights and a jig and fly, a 3/16 X3” ferocerium rod with a fat wood handle, a ¼” X 1” ferocerium rod with a hole in it that has a small bundle of jute attached to it, 10 strike anywhere matches with a piece of sandpaper vacuum sealed in plastic, some snare wire, a condom and 4 quart sized water purification pills, a little claw knife for striking the ferocerium and to have a second edged tool and a little flashlight.

    This little bag is FULL but I can still close the zip lock. I will now vacuum seal this into plastic so that it is well protected and presto you have something that you can toss into a bag, glove compartment or coat pocket that will get you through a lot of basic needs. I also often add, in a separate sealed bag, a couple sealed 400 calorie survival rations, 2 foil packages of water and a dozen hard candies. I wish I could still find tropical chocolate. It was waxie and didn't taste very good (on purpose) but it was full of calories.
     
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  25. GS AutoTech

    GS AutoTech Expert Member
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    Excellent job. Very compact. Pure utility. No fluff. Light weight. Inexpensive.
     
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  26. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    Definitely D.I.Y., although there is something to be said of getting a pre-made, and then expanding off of it...
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2020
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  27. huntergatherer

    huntergatherer New Member
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  28. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    The paracord will do for a tourniquet. The kit needs a condom and some water purification tab or something to make water safe to drink and a way to carry it. A condom in a sock is an amazingly durable canteen. Depending on your skills you might add some wire for snares and some other personal skill tools. A fresnel magnifyer is like a credit card the will start a fire. Some matches are good for a FAST emergency fire. There are a lot of ways to make them waterproof and durable. I like a compass and even a tiny one will point out north on a cloudy day or night. A few candies might be nice both as a small calorie boost and a morale boost.

    Each person has different needs and skills and the needs for different places always need to be taken into account. Example. Where I live there is lots of water so I go a little heavier in fishing things. Heavier line and some bigger hooks for catfish and such. This stuff wouldn't be nearly as useful in a drier place with only a few small shallow creeks. Your kit is a start now you add to it according to your plans, place, and skills.
     
  29. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Don't forget to add to kit a decent paper pad and pen.

    When using a tournaquet, keep notes in pad AND a note on person's clothing being treated.

    Forget the "write it on patient's forehead" gossip. Time date note and specifics and attach to person with your own copy in pad.

    I am NOT a sales rep for "Rite in the Rain" products of Tacoma, Washington ...... there are other, less costly products out there now ...... but rather a serious Prepper. Regular school paper can be used. Insert in a Ziploc bag.

    Do "flesh out" your medical kits.
     
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  30. huntergatherer

    huntergatherer New Member
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    good point regarding noting date and time for the tourniquet. I added a small sharpie to my kit (my tourniquet has a specific surface to write the time on when applying)
     
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  31. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    IMHO DIY is the way to go. First, all of your kits should be personalized for your situation. There is no "One Size Fits ALL". Second, the gear in most kits is suspect at best. Most of it is probably junk, and I for one would not rely on it to save my life. Third, cost. The decent kits I have seen are prohibitively expensive. Prepare a list, and go out and buy good year. Again, JMHO but I think you will come out way ahead.
     
  32. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    My recommendation...DIY. Specialize the kit to your needs and your area. Also remember, the more you learn/know, the less gear you need. Wants are preferable to needs.

    Dale
     
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  33. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I have thought about this some more and how more to say on this subject. (Suprise!) The thing is that there IS no one survival kit that does the job. The thing is that one can't cover really well all of your needs. Truth be told, I have 5 or 6 different survival kits. I have one tiny one that is not much bigger than a wallet that I can have any time that I leave the house even for just a walk. I have a slightly bigger one that is in a fanny pack that I wear anything that I go into the woods. I have a small backpack-sized one that is my light grab and RUN kit. Then for a more planned take off I have a big Alice pack with a frame that has a very complete never coming home survival kit. In my truck, there is a slightly different much heavier kit that would allow me to handle a lot more in the way of serious injuries and have tools that would be too heavy to carry in a backpack. That truck IS a survival kit in some ways. There is a permanent kit in my wife's car and another permanent kit in my boat.

    The thing is that sometimes survival is a simple matter of comfort over a night or two and that just doesn't need the same things in it that an End of the freaking world situation will need. The best most extensive survival kit in the world will be useless if you don't have it with you. I am serious about survival and know myself well enough to know that there is no way that I am going to wag a big heavy pack around with me all the time. I also know that that isn't always what I need.

    I recommend that you start in the middle and then as money and time allow you fill out your other needs. You spend a lot more time in town than you do in the woods but you are a lot more likely to have a survival problem in the woods than on the city streets. I carry a handgun most all of the time and like to have some basic medical stuff and a few other things in the way of a pocket knife and some small pocket and belt tools. LOL, I was a boy scout and my Dad was a scoutmaster. I guess that I may have taken the "Always be prepared" thing to somewhat of an extreme but there have been several times over the years when it has been nice to have on hand things that I need in an emergency situation.
     
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  34. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning TexDanm,

    Good Prepper philosophy ......

    A few months ago, a dialogue started here - Sourdough, Radar (lives a little north of you; orig from Virginia) and me. Forgot who other. I started a sheet of notebook paper to address our topic of assembling equipment for each and every type of one's assignment as a Prepper. Don't know what happend; miss the discussion.

    I have a hybred approach. Here also, about 5 - 6 different types and sizes of pounches for kits for each category. For first aid: a few kits of various sizes and contents already made. For instruments, eg a degree compass, mil compass: to expensive to have more so each of my assignments whether an evac, a never returning here, means the same instruments into different pouches/kits (Binoculars in pouch. Pouch in kit with buchu lens paper [light weight !] and flannel type cloth.) An additional kit called "multi-repair kit" is sewing stuff, a tube of Liquid Nails brand adhesive, 2 small rolls of different tape, some mallable wire, a couple of clamps and some 107 lb braided fabric fishing line.

    My time-money kit is my medical kit. Arctic Zone brand makes insulates ice chests down to the small size. I have a 7"x 9" x 4" pouch size for an RX medicine. My medical kit - various sizes of pouches must be tailor-made per event. It's a project assembling.

    We're not in "Be Prepared" extremes ! It's really the basics. Most others fill this need by reliance on government. Call 911.

    Wait 'till they call and hear: "Your call is important to us. At the tone, ......
     
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  35. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
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    And here I'm without any of the so called survival kit.
     
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  36. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    mine is more of a Get Home bag than a survival kit.
     
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  37. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Master Survivalist
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    I have lots of DIY "survival kits." Each vehicle, including my ATV/UTVs and snow machines have survival items in them that I change out several times a year (summer verses winter). These kits are tailored towards the usual activities associated with those vehicles. I also have a couple cached near fall back cabins and escape routes. I also have a DIY backpack in addition to the above kits that I always carry with me in whatever I leave the compound that's packed with unique survival/personal protection items that I always want with me. This way I always have two kits at hand. One geared towards the activity, and one geared towards me.
     
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  38. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    I saw an interesting You Tube video where the guy had narrowed his bug out bags down to three kits: Medical supplies, Firearms, and Food. What he had and how he arranged it made good sense.

    I had already done something very similar, but truth be known, my medical kit could use some improvement. I have always had an ARK bag (Armed Response Kit); a Food bag; and general purpose BOB's for all seasons. My car kit has the extra tools, and my Get Home bag is also always in the car, which I drive 99.9% of the time.

    There are many grab-and-go bags stashed around the house that have a minimum of gear if we had to leave in an instant.
     
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  39. survivalgames121

    survivalgames121 Expert Member
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    I personally wouldn't go prebuilt for a couple of reasons:

    1. Ive found that prebuilt kits are not tailored to your specific need a (you might have to add on for your specific need.
    2. some of the items you get could be cheaply made
    3. depending on where you get it you might be paying more for a incomplete kit when you could save money building it yourself

    now if your looking for something to start with and build around then it cold be useful but if your are in question of some of the items don't buy it because it may have mixed results as to the functionality of your bag
     
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  40. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    pre built kits fill a need if that is all someone has, it can cover most of the basics until such time as someone can decide what they need and build their own kit, its better than nothing. it can also help people figure out what they need and what they dont need. we each may have different requirements depending on ones lifestyle, situation and location.
     
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