Field Rain Gear ("real Rain Gear")

Discussion in 'Survival Gear' started by Pragmatist, Sep 5, 2020.

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  1. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    https://www.outdoorlife.com/story/hunting/effective-rain-gear-for-mountain-hunters/


    Good morning all,

    Above is a hunting-themed article on rain gear. It is just about completely the same for Preppers in field conditions.

    Note author's 3 categories of gear.

    Note distinction between water proof and water-resistent.

    ......

    Besides learning about clouds in the Boy Scouts, my first lesson on weather was on arriving at Ft Lewis, Washington. At the welcoming intro, the sergeant said "If you can see Mt Rainier, it is going to rain. If you cannot see Mt Rainier, it is raining".
     
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  2. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    its an advert.
     
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  3. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
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    For rain gear, I'm sticking to cheap OD coloured poncho
     
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  4. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    for serious rain Poncho here too, I have several stashed in various bags and vehicles.
    for normal Devon rain its combat jacket and leather hat.
     
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  5. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Surplus Swiss Army rain poncho (with hood), I think everybody's seen these or had a couple. I've bought them over the years to wear and to use as a mini-tarp (like for a cardboard box I don't want to get soaked in the rain). I actually had one wear-out, but it was due to heat exposure being behind the seat of my truck (it got a bit crispy then tore during use). I've owned them from back in the 1980's -- they were cheap back then.

    http://www.topsurvivalpreps.com/bes...for-camping-hiking-survival-doomsday-preppers

    Since they are so wide, you have some sort of mini-tent. Can be cumbersome, but you can pull your arms out of the sleeves and work on some device under your mini-tent -- done that several times.

    In the 1990s (late 1990s?) retailers started asking retail prices for the surplus ponchos.

    Found one! Amazon sez they have it, but are asking $35. When they first started coming into America, surplus stores had stacks of them. It was like surplus ammo coming in during the 1970s and 80s -- crates of ammo for a song.

    https://www.amazon.com/BudK-Swiss-C...words=swiss+army+poncho&qid=1599324609&sr=8-1


    2e8184159996a012baeeeae549a67051.jpeg
     
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  6. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    Gore-Tex is great, until it isn't. I've used military grade gear (Not always the greatest) and have had it fail when really needed and then your walking, wet and your teeth are chattering while your body is trying to keep your core temp up. Also used the old Army rubberized rain gear and with it you can end up soaking wet from your own sweat. I have finally settled on using merino wool first and second layers, with a Gore-Tex lined rain jacket on top for rain weather. Also learned to not get sweaty as it causes more problems than you can solve in bad weather. Keep a slow steady pace and add or delete layers as needed to prevent sweating.

    Gore-Tex also becomes junk when it gets dirty. Dirt interferes with how the fabric works and you end up wet from rain and sweat. So, there is that.

    I've also taken to using either a shemagh or a cotton scrim (sniper veil) which helps with heat control and sweat when needed.

    Dale
     
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  7. Max rigger

    Max rigger Expert Member
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    Wash your Gore-Tex kit in warm water with a mild detergent, hang dry and give it a blow over with a hair drier set on low and bingo your back in business. If I'm just out in the woods, not working hard I like the old Barbour wax jacket I have, really keeps the wet stuff out, baggy fit so body steam/moisture don't build up too much. Poncho's are OK at best, all right for padding about in the woods but shite on the hills or in windy weather, be OK riding a horse I guess for all you cowboys.

    Brit army Goretex kit is good, the bivy bag is really good. My favorite suplus goretex is the French army jacket, really well cut and very well put together.

    Civvy Goretex for me (jackets) is Berghaus and Rab, not cheap but very well put together, plenty of pockets, great designs, whats not not love. Rab still makes gear in the UK not the far east so I'm sticking with them at the moment.
     
    1. Dalewick
      My favorite in the woods jacket is actually a SAS Smock. Best military apparel world wide. Wind and rain resistant and enough pockets to carry your camp with you without a pack. My smock with a veil and a pair of multicam fatigues. Throw on either a wool ski cap or a multicam boonie and appropriate boots/shoes and it's time to hit the woods. It's almost archery deer season and the itch is bad.

      Dale
       
      Dalewick, Sep 7, 2020
  8. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good evening all,

    My 2 pfennigs worth ..........

    I'm like Lonewolf; a field jacket meets the basic requirements for me.

    I rely on the US Army's old M-65 field jacket - of Fidel Castro fame - for both bug protection and rainy day handling.

    If working in a field environment that's chilly, I'd rather be warm and wet than freezing and wet.

    The traditional Army poncho was scientifically designed to shed rain water from the upper body with focused drips and runoffs into the boots.

    A famous business signature line here: "When it rains, it pours."
     
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    1. Dalewick
      The old U.S. Army ponchos are great for making a hooch to live under short term. Hated the thing for rain wear. Still have one in my GHB for emergencies.
       
      Dalewick, Sep 7, 2020
  9. Max rigger

    Max rigger Expert Member
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    The standard M65 cotton/poly cotton jackets are good dry cold weather coats but not great in the rain. Shop around for an Austrian army version which come with a twin layer Gore-Tex liner IIRC.

    Pertex is worth looking out for too, not fully waterproof but will shed light rain pretty well, I've got two Down jackets with Pertex outer shell.
     
  10. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    I've got a Para jacket which I wear a lot in the cooler wetter months, although its not lined it is pretty good in all but monsoon conditions.
     
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  11. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Max,

    Concur that the M65 field jacket is not great in rain; just about minimal or a little better.

    The US Army M65 Field Jacket designed for the temperate zones. Whether it's fine for dry cold weather has got to be the comparison between the M65 and a Haiwaian short sleved shirt. Maybe it's my Yellow Fever. I freeze in the M65 but it meets minimum requirements to maintain core temperature.

    I have the 2 types of M65 liners. The original was a bulky terry cloth liner. The newer version was made of poly bunting in a nylon shell. My experience calls both useless bulk.

    Also have the storm hood for the M65. It has the artifical white fur outlining the hood section of wearer. We nicknamed this fur "The enemy sniper's work relief act". The hood did keep the wind off the neck but dangerous to wear if on a mission.

    I've got the German field jacket version ... admitting not remembering the Austrian version ... The German jacket has the inside pockets. In olden days I could tell you how many Coors brand narrow beer cans caould be carried in the inside of the German jacket.

    Post military contractor nonsense, my basic foundation for serious field work is a foundation of 2 layers of Jaeger British wool underwear, then a tight knit sweater, next is shirt then sometimes 4 pocket shirt. Next: goose vest. Overseas I have a fur coat.

    I've developed a bias for the "breathable" fabrics. Probably, it's just personal; I just can't rely on them. So far, I'm still here and was part of a productive team.
     
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  12. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
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    Guess I'm the only one who wore full rubber rain gear (poncho + PVC boots) :D
     
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    1. Dalewick
      Wore rubber rain gear in South Korea in March of 84'. Miserable for 4 weeks with trench foot, recurring jungle rot, frost bite, emersion foot and I forgot what all else. Thank goodness! I hated that gear and burned it when I got back to base in the tropics.
       
      Dalewick, Sep 7, 2020
    2. varuna
      That because you wore them at sub arctic climate (Korea) :p Rubber rain gear is specific to tropical climate :D Its even standard issue here. And surprisingly work well too.
       
      varuna, Sep 8, 2020
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  13. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Varuna,

    You're actually at the stratospheric top of the pile.

    Just remain on the planet.

    You're acclimating for the new stuff.

    The new "clothing" will be impervious material as part of a "space suit". It will be a climate-control armored HAZMAT suit.

    This is what I'm hearing.

    Meanwhile, this stuff is heavy to wear.

    We must all stay young.
     
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  14. Max rigger

    Max rigger Expert Member
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    I know a guy who likes to wear full rubber gear but thats not for this type of forum ;)
     
  15. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
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    I strongly doubt lubricated non-latex rubber will fare well as rain gear, although they are great for transporting water
     
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  16. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    okay, okay, none of that smut, keep it clean and keep it on topic, folks.:rolleyes:
     
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  17. arctic bill

    arctic bill Master Survivalist
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    I used to work for a large municipal city, they gave us the complete rain suit.
    rubber boots
    rain overalls
    matching jacket with hood.
    and yes you would sweat to death inside all that gear but
    this is what the boys figured out.
    1) wear the pants backwards .
    2) do not do up the front part of the jacket
    3) do not do up the hood but wear a rain hat
    as long as you worked slow which was not that hard for municipal employees
    It was tolerable .
     
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  18. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    I used to work on Dartmoor at one time repairing stone walls, we were given those yellow rain suits-jackets and trousers- and rubber boots with steel toe caps, we used to sweat something awful in those things, in the end I'd rather get wet than wear them again.
     
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  19. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    Speaking of gear. Has anyone here used the Dutch KL Shagmaster shirt. It's more of a jacket and intermediate layer but looks like a warm piece of gear. High neck that zips. hangs long in the back so no cold back from being exposed. Thumb cuffs for keeping the wrist warm and a warm, shaggy fabric for warmth. It's also flame resistant. I have one on backorder for $29.99 USD. Looking forward to trying it.

    461525dd507cf0cc1c.jpg

    On sale at : https://www.varusteleka.com/en/product/dutch-kl-flame-resistant-shagmaster-shirt-surplus/63138

    Dale
     
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    1. TMT Tactical
      Looking forward to your review.
       
      TMT Tactical, Sep 7, 2020
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  20. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Where I live it is nearly always too warm for the rain suits so all that I use is ponchos. I used to have a camo overall that was water-resistant. I have worn it in the rain and waded waist-deep water when it was right at freezing and was sweating. It was pretty nice for sitting in a deer stand when it was really cold but as soon as you started moving you had to open it up.
     
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  21. Max rigger

    Max rigger Expert Member
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    I'd never be seen wearing Shagmaster garments....Shagmaster means something completely different in colloquial English. Shag is a type of carpet or tobacco but to us brits its

    "
    shag
    A British slang term for sexual intercourse. Used by people who think the term "making love" is too innocent and "fuck" is too coarse. "


    Have you tried https://www.swanndri.co.nz/mens/bushshirts.html

    Pendleton make good wool shirts but I prefer a 'swanni'
     
  22. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    I've told you about this type of post on this thread already.
    any more of this and i'm shutting this thread down.
     
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  23. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Master Survivalist
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    When I absolutely want to stay dry, such as bouncing around on a fishing boat in a rainstorm in Prince William Sound, I will be wearing my Helly Hanson or Grundens. I have enough where I will never need to buy "rain gear." I would not typically wear these for other Alaskan outdoor activities. I have in reserve my old Army wet weather gear and gore-tex jackets. I have enough where I will never need to buy more "rain gear" in my lifetime.

    I have had good luck using the Browning Hell's outdoor clothing, including their Hell's Canyon, Wicked Wing and other outdoor clothing lines. It's the only brand the local Three Bears store carries, so this is what I've been purchasing (with the execption of LL Bean, Carhartt and Filson). The various Browning clothing have all exceeded my expectations based on my experience with military and some of the other brands I have tried. I have a Browning jacket that is coming into it's 6th winter that is a little ragged but still fully functional (waterproof, windproof and warm). Perfect for the bush as it doesn't rip like your typical Patagonia city slicker jacket would. It's a three layer system and is good except for the coldest of days. Top quality wool is pretty water resistant as well and super durable. Right now I am typically only buying Filson, Carhartt, LL Bean and Browning branded outdoor clothing. I am tired of bad gear, so I don't bother with stuff that isn't self proven through experience.

    For the most extreme cold weather, I wear a jacket and pants suit I got from a store in Anchorage that caters to Alaskans who enjoy the extreme outdoors weather. For the life of me I can't remember the brand. But it set me back some 600 plus dollars about 10 years ago. Toastie at 60 below, they say. It only gets to -30 on the coldest of days in my parts.
     
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  24. Max rigger

    Max rigger Expert Member
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    Not as cold in the UK John, most I would experience would be -15c on the Hills in Scotland plus wind chill factor so out mountain walking it can easily feel like -25c. I've got an HH jacket somewhere, pretty good if I remember right.
     
  25. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Master Survivalist
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    There are a lot of areas in Scotland that look just like Alaska. The highlands, the western shoreline and the lakes in particular (I’ve not been to the east coast of Scotland). I recall similar challenges in unpredictable summer weather in both Alaska and Scotland where it could be warm one minute and cold, wet and windy a short time later. In Alaska we have a saying “there is no such thing as bad weather, but only bad gear.” After moving to Alaska, I quickly learned the truth about this. This might apply to Scotland as I recall seeing people enjoying the outdoors regardless of the weather during my times there!
     
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  26. Max rigger

    Max rigger Expert Member
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    And another good saying is "There is no such thing as cold, just lack of heat" which is scientifically correct.

    If you were dropped off blind folded in parts of Scotland and Scandinavia you could easily think you were in Alaska. I like 'holiday' heat, sunshine on a holiday/vacation but truth is when out hiking I prefer colder months every time...has that special smell, wet rock, moss, trees even water, I love it.
     
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  27. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    I was once told by an avid hiker "there is no such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing"......load of boll##ks.
     
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  28. Max rigger

    Max rigger Expert Member
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    Pretty accurate view really, there has been a massive improvement in materials since WW2 and you can survive any weather with the appropriate clothing. You said you like the old para smock but lets be honest you'd be an idiot to use that in anything like wet weather, you'd need a waterproof shell to keep you dry, the shell is appropriate to the smock. When I first signed up I met guys who remember the older smocks and hated them and thanked the lord the day Gore-Tex became general issue and not just reserved for Special Forces.
     
  29. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    every time I hear about Gore-Tex I keep remembering how much noise it makes, no good for hunting or bird or badger watching, I like the old para jacket and the other combat jackets I have, I dont really like modern clothing.
    I have a waterproof army poncho for serious rain!
     
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  30. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    Lonewolf, I'm not familiar with what's available to you in the UK but all of the goretex apparel I've purchased or been issued was very quiet. Most apparel with it has it sewn in so that it isn't seen without opening up a seam. Some of the early jackets I had with it were very noisy and crinkly but I found out that was due to the cheap outer fabric they were made from (government = lowest bidder). If you can try one of the new jackets with Goretex. It may surprise you. The new types of military gear (Brit and USA) are much better. Try a SAS smock with the Goretex or one of the USA ECWS jackets and you may be surprised.

    The stuff has come a long ways since my first using it in the late 80's and early 90's. I will admit, I came a long ways also by learning how to properly maintain it.

    Dale
     
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  31. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    thanks Dale but I am perfectly happy with the clothing I already have, its proved its worth time and again.
    I've always said " if its good enough for the British Army its good enough for me!"
     
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  32. Max rigger

    Max rigger Expert Member
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    You experience of Gore-Tex must be many years ago when it was stiff and noisy, changed years ago plus of course you can have Gore-Tex lined jackets.
     
  33. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    probably was some years ago, I tend to have a long memory!:D:D
     
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  34. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    Several years ago I bought a very good set of Columbia Sportswear rain gear. It was expensive at the time, but compared to today's numbers I got a heck of a deal. It has served me well through some torrential rainstorms. It is hooded and vented; over-sized so it can be worn comfortably over other clothing and layers. Keeps you as dry as can be expected even in a downpour.

    I have always had very good luck with every piece of Columbia Sportswear gear I have ever purchased.
     
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  35. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Master Survivalist
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    I still have a set of that very noisy original Gore-Tex army field jacket and the field jacket that predated the Gore-Tex. They still fit but I haven't had them on in years. I also didn't care for the original army Gore-Tex for that very reason. Plus they were more expensive and you were forced to buy it. Everyone had to be uniform in their uniforms.
     
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  36. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Do forgive if I wax nostalgic. One hundred years+ ago, folk would wear waxed/oiled canvas long coats. That sort of gear with the Western look is still around even today -- and it is not cheap. I've read that these do not breathe well; so it goes. I've waxed/oiled old military long-coats out of Europe, this when at university. A lot of us guys did. Second-hand stores would have these occasionally. War booty. An old veteran would die and the family would sell-off the coats he had "liberated" while in the European theater, WWI & WWII. We'd oil our boots and oil our long coats, add wax and work it into the fabric.

    If I owned a Western duster coat, I'd have to buy me a single-action revolver (holster & belt to match) to go with the coat. I've owned such revolvers over the years, however I currently am out of them, trade trade trade, gone gone gone. I do have my Winchester Trapper rifle that would fit under such a coat. Too, I have an adorable Henry "Mare's Leg" -- that too would fit under a long coat. Longer the barrel, greater the velocity, greater the magazine capacity. Yet, I love firing the old style single actions. Liked firing a .45 Long Colt a friend owned (mine were .357s).

    I'd like to give into the whole nostalgia thing; right now money goes to matters more practical, firearms more practical. I guess part of the nostalgia feelings come from the reality of how tough & durable our ancestors were vs. the non-adults that populate Western nations in this day and age. Maybe when the cities get wiped-out, better breed-stock humans will be left. Hopefully so.

    Here's one retailer out of many:

    Men's
    https://www.outbacktrading.com/collections/mens-oilskin

    Women's
    https://www.outbacktrading.com/collections/womens-oilskin

    Here are some concealed carry coat; they've pockets to stow your felon-euthanizers:

    https://www.outbacktrading.com/collections/mens-concealed-carry

    This add says that their coat is "breathable" -- hmmm, I wonder about that. It has an inside pocket for your handgun.
    https://www.outbacktrading.com/coll...w-rider-oilskin-duster?variant=12735510773813
    Here's a photo
    upload_2020-9-11_0-5-54.png



    Here's a retailer with some seriously nostalgic designs going on:

    https://www.wildcowboy.com/Dusters_c477.htm

    Same company, but these jackets and vests are designed for concealed carry:

    https://www.wildcowboy.com/Concealed-Carry-Western-Wear_c940.htm

    In the coming months, we preppers are going to have to figure-in the carrying of firearms into the designs of our clothing and coats we are going to wear. Boots also, I guess.

    Love this boot revolver; photo below. These are in .22 mag., sounds light, but the .22 mag does nasty meat & bone damage. I've owned .22 mag firearms of all manner ilk in both rifles and revolvers. I've killed with them and oh my do they tear-up a critter. A .22 mag derringer will blow a nasty hole through a treated (outdoor use) 2" x 4".

    Here's a break-top North American Arms boot gun. Guess what, they're good for sticking in a boot, who'd'a thunk it.

    https://northamericanarms.com/produ...der-ranger-ii/ranger-ii-sidewinder-ranger-ii/

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2020
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  37. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Old Geezer,

    I like the modern versions of oil cloth.

    Was impressed with Israel's IDF load-bear surpenders. It's a new version of the old oil cloth.

    The original fabric was cotton canvas soaked and treated with linseed oil.

    The new manufacturing processes minimize the weight but maintain the protection aspects of pouches for the carried equipment.

    The US military is still contractor-controlled. The US civilian market, like True North brand pouches and load bearing suspenders is too thin and flemsey for some stuff. I don't use thin nylon for instruments.

    US contractors use much off the shelf industrial types of stuff.
     
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  38. Max rigger

    Max rigger Expert Member
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  39. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    P, Are you talking about the Epoch combat system of the IDF?

    2087.jpg

    Dale
     
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  40. Max rigger

    Max rigger Expert Member
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    Robert W. Gore, 83, passed away on 17th September 2020. Thank you Robert for keeping me dry so many times R.I.P.
     
  41. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good afternoon Dale,

    I had missed your above post with the IDF rig.

    Don't remember if I was working near guys with this version or another.

    I do remember the flaps on the ammo pounches were much thinner - and lighter in weight - than the stuff I had on active duty.
     
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