Firewood, Summer Work.

Discussion in 'Other Homesteading' started by Keith H., Nov 9, 2016.

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  1. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    We have a wood stove & a wood heater. The wood stove also supplies our hot water. We use firewood all year round, so need to keep a good store of dry wood. We use more in winter of course, so all summer we cut,cart & stack firewood. When I was a young bloke & cut with an axe, then I dragged the timber home across the fields & my Father & I would cut the timber to size with a cross cut saw. These days I use chainsaws, but I still have the axes & cross cut saw just in case we need them again one day.
    2C2yy-bW1wC-PABQiIECEKr1q3L9chLV.jpeg
    Sign of wood poachers having been at work in our forest. They poach wood for profit, not for their own use.
    Keith.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2017
  2. CivilDefense

    CivilDefense Expert Member
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    We too have a woodstove. Quite a bit of timber came down this winter. We called it "the winter from hell" in our parts. Regardless, I bucked most of it up, split the wood by hand, and it is now stored in a couple different places on our property. It was a lot of work, but we have fuel for the stove for years. :D
     
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  3. Harrysung

    Harrysung New Member
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    In my place, we only use firewood occasionally, mostly during animal slaughter.
     
  4. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    We use 7ords of wood every season oct-may so we cut 10 just incase well aged and dry the wood we used this winter was cut and split in 2015 its june and i have 3 cords cut and 2 split allready just cleaning storm damage trees up from winter and spring storms as you cut and harvest wood we plant 3 to replace it oder trees at least 18 acrossed are what we cut
     
  5. Corzhens

    Corzhens Master Survivalist
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    In one of our vacation in the mountain resort of Baguio where the climate is cool, we always buy firewood for the fireplace. One time, the caretaker offered us cheap firewood that he would get from the fallen pine tree nearby. We saw how he cut up the log to come up with some firewood for our use. He said that a chainsaw is the best but since there was no chainsaw, what he used was an ax. It was real hard work that in my pity, I gave him a bigger tip which is more expensive if we had bought the firewood from the market. By the way, what's good in pine wood is that it doesn't need to be dried. Even when fresh, it ignites.
     
  6. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Pine has sap that burns wet pine is good for outside fire dry pine burn in stove clean pipe or chimmely of5en as it make alot of creasote
     
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  7. jeager

    jeager Master Survivalist
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    I have a 10 hp gas log splitter but don't use it much any longer.
    Age and a bad back limits my wood cutting these days.
    Still it's an option if there is a shtf.
    I'll do what I need to do.
    I also have a large wood/charcoal grill if need be.
     
  8. CivilDefense

    CivilDefense Expert Member
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    After splitting a ton of firewood, I started to consider this option. A family member of mine is getting up in age and he swears by it. What make/model do you have? Have you found it faster than manually?
     
  9. jeager

    jeager Master Survivalist
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    After 4 crippling back injuries in police work I just can't swing a splitter much any more.
    MUCH faster than manual.
    I don't recall the model but it has a briggs 10 h.p. gas engine and I would NOT
    go anything less.
    I have a lot of tough red oak and locust.
    Locust burns really hot.
    Actually most all equipment like that are build buy very few outfits
    under different "brand" names.
    Almost ALL equipment for outdoor work is made by M.T.D. even
    John Deere and Cub Cadet.
    Deer and Cub do not make small gas equipment.
     
  10. I.survive

    I.survive Member
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    Shame about that Keith
     
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  11. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    We have purchased another truck better suited to collecting firewood in the forest. We bought a 4x4 diesel Triton tray back with bull bar, tow bar, racks, wide wheels, long range fuel tank & a light bar.
    Keith.
    0b027a1ed7dfb892121e2342e4a538f6.jpeg 0b027a1ed7dfb892121e2342e4a538f6.jpeg
     
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  12. I.survive

    I.survive Member
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    Mitsubishi have good reliable engines imo ...nice choice.

    You could convert your truck to run on wood.
     
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  13. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Not sure that I have the expertise & equipment to be able to do that mate.
    Keith.
     
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  14. I.survive

    I.survive Member
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    I’m the same Keith. I wouldn’t know where to start. I seen it on a YouTube video. The truck was the same shape as yours and it reminded me of the video. Good idea though but out of my capabilities lol
     
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  15. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    I'm much too busy to waste time during the spring or summer...most of our felling takes place in winter, the deciduous trees are dormant and there is less sap in the wood meaning it's lighter and drys more quickly. A lot of what I do is coppicing so that it re-grows from the stump which should always be done while the tree is dormant.
    There is a lot less undergrowth or insect activity in winter making the job much easier.(mosquitos really piss me off)
    It also means that there are no nesting birds while I'm felling in winter.
    When I'm dropping trees for firewood I try to get it felled, cut, split and stacked on the same day rather then leave it lying on the ground so that the wood drys fast and free of rot.
    I get through at least four cord of firewood each winter, sometimes more. I try and cut wood at least two years in advance so I'll always have enough dry wood.
     
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  16. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Master Survivalist
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    We use between 7-9 cords of wood each year. Fortunately I don’t need to venture too far to get it. I really enjoy the time spent with my wife as we work as a great team harvesting the wood.
     
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  17. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    We rarely cut down living trees unless it is part of widening the firebreak, or coppicing. For firewood I only cut down dead trees, plus cutting up those which have fallen. So the wood is dried already. Sometimes I will cut a dead tree only to find that it has not completely dried out, in which case it stays stacked until it is dry.
    Keith.
     
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  18. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Same here John, & my wife has said the same thing.
    Keith.
     
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  19. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    I doubled the size of my woodshed

    cac19f1c519800787250dd35d98d4504.jpeg
     
  20. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    @randyt between this photo and others on another thread, you have some of the prettiest and straightest timbers I've seen. What kind of trees did they come from?


    .
     
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  21. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Agreed, I was thinking the same thing. Nothing like that grows here, more the pitty. I too would like to know what type of trees those are.
    Keith
     
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  22. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    They are white cedar and balsam fir with a few spruce.
     
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