How Do You Plan A Multi-terain/ Multi-climate Bug Out Bag?

Discussion in 'Survival Kits' started by BigZirp, Sep 18, 2017.

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  1. BigZirp

    BigZirp Well-Known Member
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    I Live in New England. We have Hot Humid Summers, Warm days / Cool Nights in the Spring and Fall , and very windy freezing cold Winters with much snow fall. I Also live in an area where I may be forced to Urban Survival, Wooded Forrest Survival, or Coastal Survival. How do most people plan for the multi Climate/Terrain B.O.B.? I don't want 3 different bags for the seasons, nor do I want to constantly update my B.O.B. every couple months. Suggestions?
     
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  2. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    I don't... I pack my bug out bag for the terrain I'm going to be in and re-pack it for the changing seasons. My cashes are more comprehensive.
    I know this isn't much help but there is no point packing more then you need or can carry. Maybe more planning could lighten your load.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2017
  3. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Experience, experimental archaeology & research. I too live in New England, but my kit is just as suited to the tropics as it is to the Alps. I found all the answers in the 18th century, which in MY OPINION is better suited to long term wilderness living regardless of the terrain or climate.
    Sleeping bags are good in some circumstances, but unlike a blanket they do not retain warmth when wet, they are restricting & can be difficult to get out of in an emergency, they are very bulky & really do not serve any other purpose. A blanket on the other hand does retain warmth even when wet, it is not restrictive & easy to shed in an emergency. A blanket will double as clothing & a shelter & a pure wool blanket is fireproof. This is how I look at & choose my equipment in total.
    Keith.
     
  4. BigZirp

    BigZirp Well-Known Member
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    That makes perfect sense and I will take your advice on that. Buy what about tools. So 2 useful items in Urban survival are Bolt Cutters and some type of prybar. I prefer Stanley's Fubar. But in both a coastal or Woodland survival they would have no use.
     
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  5. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    You have to be sensible & practicle. Just how much of a priority are bolt cutters & a pry-bar? What do you think you might NEED to use these tools for? Cutting a chain somewhere? Prying open what? A door or window? Both of these are heavy tools, & personally I don't see a need for them. For one I would not be staying around in an urban environment long enough to use them. I can think of far more important items to carry.
    Prepping is all about making the right choices up front before anything goes down. If you have a good kit, then you don't need items to help you break into anywhere to get anything else. The first sign of the shtf, you get out of town & go bush. Staying in town/city is a very risky thing to do, & carrying the extra weight of a pry-bar & bolt cutters will slow you down & be a threat to your survival.
    Just my personal opinion.
    Keith.
     
  6. BigZirp

    BigZirp Well-Known Member
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    My thpufht
    My thought is its your B.O.B. and on you/near you or your vehicle all the time. When you are int the city and SHTF you need to get out. Major cities like Boston are grid lock just from people leaving work nevermind mass hystaria. You'll never get out with your car. Bolt cutter to a chain blocking an alley or prying your way thru a building can be a quick way out.
     
  7. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    If you have a vehicle, then the whole question is immaterial!
    Keith.
     
  8. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    we don't have multi terrain in England, no mountains, no deserts.
    the only multi terrain would be the difference between rural and urban.
     
  9. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    You have fields, the moors, the Scotland terrain is different again & the Welsh mountains. You also have rivers & lakes & the Islands off shore. Quite a range of terrains & places to go when you think about it.
    Keith.
     
  10. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    yes but I am in the middle of the countryside, no mountains, no deserts, just fields and woods and yes the moors.
     
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  11. BigZirp

    BigZirp Well-Known Member
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    Yes, but stuck in gridlock traffic, mass hysteria, and a state of emergency i wouldn't have a problem ditching the car and hoofing it. But it does bring up a good point, i can carry the other tools in my car next to my B.O.B. and if I'm not in the situation then they stay behind.
     
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  12. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    Bicycles can easily increase your load capacity by 200% or more while increasing your speed. They use no fuel other then your own body's effort and are almost silent.
    A bicycle is easy to maintain,won't get gridlocked, light enough to lift over fences and gates. It's also easy to hide.
    They may not look cool, after all it's hard to imagine Arnie's terminator riding one but they will get you moving.
     
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  13. BigZirp

    BigZirp Well-Known Member
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  14. BigZirp

    BigZirp Well-Known Member
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    I have a bicycle but i dont take it to work everyday. Too far.
     
  15. omegaman

    omegaman Expert Member
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    There's so many sides to this. Like Keith says, wool blankets and sleeping bags. Me, I have a wool blanket sleeping bag that's an outer layer of a water-resistant material, two wool blankets and a finer wool inner. Where I live it's close to impossible to be comfortable under all conditions but you'll have to regulate the temperature with your shelter and fire.

    When I did my basic military training in 96 winters was harsher here and our loadout, backpack was full of thinner clothing. That's my reccomendation. Dress in layers. That way it's easier to regulate your core temperature. But I bet your mum told you so allready, I know mine did.

    Also what you drink. Warm water will warm you up and cold will cool you down. Take many short stops and take on and off layers. Don't move around in thick clothing but apply when needed, wich will be when you sit down or are still for some reason.

    Wear a hat. Most of your bodyheat will escape through your head. Next comes your scrotum. Open your flyer if you are too hot.

    /Ome - Lappland, Sweden.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2017
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  16. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I agree with omegaman, I carry extra warm clothing in my blanket roll, & I dress in layers. On a winters night I put the warm clothing in my blanket roll on top of my other clothing.
    You need to stay cool when travelling, if you perspire then your underclothing will get damp. If your clothing is damp from perspiration, then you will get cold at night. Dry the shirt in front of the fire at night before bedding down. If it is not safe to light a fire, swop your damp shirt for the dry shirt next to your skin & wear the damp shirt on top if it is cold enough to warrant extra clothing. I carry a wool shirt, a wool waistcoat & a wool Monmouth cap in my blanket roll.
    Keith.
     
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  17. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    I have thought about this post a lot. Basically I don't have a clue how you could be prepared and mobile with a single bag that would cover all the different terrains and the wild temperature range that you will HAVE to deal with. If something isn't possible then don't try and do it. You are going to need a way to carry a lot more stuff than will fit in a single bag unless you are a very small amn, the clothing alone would require a big bag. If you are small then you can take the clothes off anybody and get by. If you are like me and over 6" and big to boot you had better have some warm clothes.

    Now, for traveling and keeping your weight down, wool army blankets can be worn as coats and a couple of wool blankets worn as serapi or poncho over your clothes with a rope belt at your waist it is very warm and might get you through until you can find or make warmer covers. Carry LOTS of paracord. The 7 strands inside are good for heavy sewing, fishing lines and snare lines by plaiting or braiding to the strength you need. The outer shell will still be good strong cord for binding things together and heavy work. 550 paracord really will support 550 pounds! I've made swings with it and put my big butt in them and bounced. No matter where you are paracord will be a great help and a lot of tools in a small package.

    You will need to search out tools that can do multiple things. Maybe carry just the metal heads of a lot of them and learn how to make your own handles out of wood you can find in the woods. I consider a draw knife for instance as a must have tool. With that, a small saw, a small adz and curved spoon knife I can make almost anything in the way of handles, bowls, spoons and triggers for traps.
     
  18. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I honestly can not see a problem here. You get hot you take clothes off, you get cold you put them back on. You don't need any special tools for suburban or city survival. You need to get out of there if you want to survive. Common sense, using your head, keeping a low profile, this will get you out of the city if you are careful. There is no magic wand, no modern multi tool that will save you life. Just get yourself a good bug out kit for the bush that will keep you in comfort long term.
    Keith.
     
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  19. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    we only have one climate in England and its usually mild, if it gets cold we put on a big coat, if it gets warm we take it off.
     
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  20. arctic bill

    arctic bill Active Member
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    big zurp. i am like you i live in a northern climate, so i have a kit in my car at all times and i keep the tank at least half full. if i can make it to my camp i am good for 3-4 months .
     
  21. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    I've never been there but I've had friends from Minnesota that have talked about it. Keith if you try to leave in say august with just the clothes you need then you have better hope you can find some clothing when winter gets there. If you are standing in waist deep snow when the temperature hits 0 F/-18 C you had better have better than a hoodie over a sweatshirt over a tshirt that was great in August. If you don't then you are DEAD.

    The question is what is the least that you could carry if you bugged out in late summer that wouldn't be a death sentence in November- February or March. A parka is not something that you can put in a fanny pack and forget until you need it. I have a sub-zero coverall that is good down to about 17F regardless of its name. It is about as big as a sleeping bag. I actually use it to sleep in during winter camping trips. It would not be enough for the deep winter in the North US or Canada.

    Some parts of the North US is sort of rural even in some towns. Everyone has big 4 wheel drive trucks and snowmobiles. Fro the winter months. In a lot of these towns if you can winter there the population in the spring will be a lot smaller and you may be in a good place.

    I am a deep South swamp rat and have no doubt that that sort of environment is as alien to a lot of people as the snowball places are to me. I literally can get by 90% other time with a t-shirt and a hoodie. My yankee friends get eat alive by mosquitos and I hardly notice them. I have no fear of spiders, snakes or alligators and have swam with them and sharks all my life with no problems. This is MY sort of place but I wouldn't survive a winter in Canada.

    How cold does it get where you live Keith? I know that the South Part of Australia is pretty cold.
     
  22. arctic bill

    arctic bill Active Member
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    i have one heavy wool blanket 5 lbs . but if it is real cold say below 0. f or c i don't care you need the following . 6 inches of spruce boughs then a wool blanket, or a foamie then a blanket, or a thermarest and blanket, the a very good sleeping bag good for 20 below and a wool toque on your head . The cold comes from below. not above. In my area Just wool blankets won't cut it .
     
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