Integrated farming

Discussion in 'Animal Husbandry' started by remnant, May 29, 2016.

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  1. remnant

    remnant Expert Member
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    Integrated farming is a good strategy for survival because it maximises the output of products while minimising input in terms of expenses. A good way of achieving this is by building a chicken cage above a fish pond so that the rich droppings from the chicken will feed the fish. Water from the fish pond can then be used to irrigate vegetables in the vicinity during water recycling. Many other strategies can be used to achieve this. Which method or system of integrated earning do you use?
     
    Moroccanbeauty2266 likes this.
  2. joshposh

    joshposh Expert Member
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    I've followed integrated farming for some time now. Everything has a bi-product and that bi-product can be used to feed and fertilize other plants, species, even a generator for your house via bio gas. Everything that we think is a waste and thrown away, we could be using to sustain ourselves for a life without utility bills.

    Hers a simple pic of what you are talking about.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. cluckeyo

    cluckeyo Well-Known Member
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    It sounds simlar to aquaponics, a tank of fish,which feeds some plants. But this goes much further. A very interesting idea. We are gonna get it all figured out eventually.
     
  4. Corzhens

    Corzhens Master Survivalist
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    I don't know if my idea of integrated farming is correct. We are aspiring to buy a small farm that we can make into an orchard. It's just a dream though but sometimes me and my husband would talk about it lengthily. Aside from the fruit trees, the ideal 1-hectare land would have a small fish pond to supply us with fish. And another benefit of the fish pond is the fertile water that can be used to irrigate the vegetable plots. In return, some crops like corn can be converted into fish food. I cannot fully explain it but my husband has a complete blue print where the plants and the animals would be co-existing and benefiting from each other.
     
  5. filmjunkie08

    filmjunkie08 Active Member
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    A lot of thought, planning, and money goes into starting an integrated farming system. I wonder how expensive it is to maintain it after it is up and running. Does anyone know?
     
  6. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    you'll need to grow or make everything you'll need post event, because you wont be getting it anywhere else.
    no chemicals, no fertilisers, no fuel deliveries, no oil.
     
  7. Moroccanbeauty2266

    Moroccanbeauty2266 Active Member
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    I really like the idea of an integrated farm.
    It makes a lot of sense and would be very practical, especially post-apocalypse.
    It might be costly and I am not
    familiar with how much animals cost or even how much a piece of land costs.....
    but if you start out with two of each animal (chickens, fish, goats, etc.) so they can breed
    you will have enough food for a long time.
     
  8. streettallest

    streettallest New Member
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    Integrated farming will certainly help any farmer save cost and reduce losses. Am currently doing this on my farm. My maize farm produces alot of wastes that can be used to feed my cows. while i sell the maize cobs for profit
     
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