Long Term Survival

Discussion in 'Permanent Shelters' started by Tom Williams, Oct 30, 2017.

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  1. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Things you need for long term survival water land shelter I say find it now !! Land first buywhat you can afford at least one acre or larger two a well these are going to be the biggest cost after that make you shelter anything from a garden shed to a home will work each and every trip to site improve your place store tools food supplies there so when shtf you are better prepared than most will be keith lonewolf and myself have been prepareing for years we have worked for years setting up a life that when shtf we will hardly notice a change in life other than we will have to move into defend our places HARD WORK NOW will payoff in longterm survival
     
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  2. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    What to place on your site a garden area berries fruit trees nut trees plant things that will grow and produce in your climate small sheds thatcan be used for chickens and livestock the work done now will make life better after shtf
     
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  3. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    On the outer edge of site plant pine trees these as they grow will do two things one it will hide you two they will act as a wind break makeing it easy to stay warm dont plant close to shelter so they dont fall and destroy your home
     
  4. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    for long term housing I have always thought that some form of round house, like the Ancient Britons, is my particular choice.
     
  5. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    I could build a house for the long term, however somebody else would have to live there for the long term because I'm not at all sure that my physical body is going to last any "long term".
     
  6. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I seem to have been lucky, I've got to a decent age(i'm retired) without having too many health issues, I know a lot of people 20-25 years younger than me and they've all got medical issues, there is an obesity crisis in the UK, everyone living on crap takeaway food because they cant be bothered to cook from fresh. I think i'll be around a lot longer post SHTF than many others.
     
  7. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    The hardest thing for people now days to adapt to is the massive down scaling that they will have to do in what they need for a "house". Even in my lifetime the size of the one family home has almost doubled. Regular homes used to be one bathroom two or three bedroom places with an eat in kitchen and a living room. I think that the house I was raised in was like 1200 square feet. What is strange is that families were bigger then but now houses are 2000 square feet minimum.

    For a survival home you want to have more of a compound situation than a single big house. During the winter it is a lot easier to warm a single room with a loft than anything else. You have to understand, people didn't used to sit in their houses like we do now. They were hot in the summer. You moved out to the porches or brush arbors. Also you really don't want to be cooking in your home except maybe a fireplace pot during the winter. Back in the days when people were cooking on open fires and such the kitchen burned down pretty often. Cast irn pots don't burn up so it wasn't all that bad. You pulled out your pots and such and rebuilt. Replacing your clothes and such wasn't nearly as easy.

    It wasn't until the advent of really good safe wood burning stoves that the cooking kitchen was moved into the house. An old time home was a collection of barns sheds and storage buildings with a small house where you went mostly to sleep and stay warm in the winter times.

    If you are having to build it with only non powered tools and from available materials Keeping it small is just about all that you can do unless you have a huge amount of lumber and nails stored ahead of time. The advent of sawmills was another thing that made the building of bigger houses easier.

    The only "insurance" that you will have is whatever you provide for yourself. That means don't put everything in one place where a fire could wipe you out. Don't even put all of your tools in one place or your guns or your clothes. This also will protect you from say robbers that attacked your place and just grabbed stuff and left. Every shed should have a hiding hole that you keep stocked with what you got to have. You might also have a storage container hidden somewhere away from your homestead.

    When you are cooking with fires you really shouldn't invest as much into building your home as people do now. Fires are going to happen. Thatched roofs don't last like asbestos shingles did nor do they protect your house from sparks coming out of the chimney. Even cedar shake shingles will dry out and burn from sparks.

    It is sad that so many things that our forefathers learned over centuries of slow progression were just cast aside in just a couple of generations and are now mostly lost. We will have to relearn so many of the old things. I am 65 and even I was raised in a world that was primitive by today's views. How many of you have experienced the pleasures of a two hole outhouse in the dead of winter??? How many of you have owned and cared for a horse and other livestock. My Dad rode a horse to school. I had a horse for most of my life. They worked the fields with mules in harness just as people have for centuries. They heated and cooked with wood that they had to cut and split themselves. The Iceman delivered ice to keep your ice box cold if you lived in town. By the time he died everything that had been considered normal for dozens of generations was gone. I learned some of it but there is no interest in it now so it will mostly die with me and my generation.
     
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  8. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Well I have to admit that we do have a 5 bedroom house & other rooms, but then we have a large family. Actually we have two houses, but the other one is only a two bedroom cottage. Part of the family is living here on the property, rest of the family not too far away but in residential areas. Come time when it all hits the fan they will all be moving to here, so we need the room. Fortifications are planned, but that will not happen until we need them & then they will go up fast.
    Keith.
    cad01b21daed899b16a73889613c6187.jpeg
    This is an older photo, but it shows the cottage up higher to the left. This is more like the houses Tex was referring to, & we lived in that cottage without any electricity for about 20 years. Both houses are now solar powered with wood heating & cooking.
    cad01b21daed899b16a73889613c6187.jpeg
    A later photo taken from above. The base of the cement water tank on the right is actually level with the apex of the house roof, this gives us our water pressure for the shower in the bathroom.
     
  9. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I lived at one time in a 2 roomed wooden caravan/trailer, 1 room was the living room/kitchen and the other was the bedroom, and this was perfectly adequate for me as I spent all the daylight hours outside.
     
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  10. PreperMary

    PreperMary New Member
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    It looks like you are in a great spot Keith!
     
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  11. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Ours was aluminium, & we still have it. It is sued for storage now.
    Keith.
     
  12. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I wish I was still there now but I had to vacate the land as I didn't own it and the heir who inherited it didn't want me there any longer, or else I still would be.
     
  13. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    Long term as always there will be many paths for different people. At some point after any crash things return to the same paths that people have followed for millennia. Just as we are preparing now to survive the fall there will also need to be plans for what you want to do when things level out. In the short term everyone needs to prepare to grow their own food or gather it for themselves but after things settle down not everyone wants to or needs to be a farmer, rancher, fisherman. You are also going to need mills to grind our grain, Smiths to build and repair our tools, Cobblers to make and repair shoes, weavers to make cloth and people to make our clothes... It goes on and on and most of these trades are a lost trade as far as doing it by hand without power tools.

    Everyone needs a profession that they can go to when times are hard. We all have talents and skills. Even just having the tools and books ahead of time might be enough. Pick something now and make it a hobby. Do something that you enjoy or learn to make something that you like. I wanted a sheath for a knife that I made and ended up making holsters and all sorts of leather crafts over the many years.
     
  14. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    i'm more of an ideas man, a planner if you like, than a trades person:)
     
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