M14 And M1 Garand Rifles

Discussion in 'Guns, Knives, Tools, Etc.' started by Dunmaghlas, Sep 23, 2018.

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  1. Dunmaghlas

    Dunmaghlas Well-Known Member
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    Anyone here own an old M14 rifle? And when I say old, I mean like 1959 type deal.
    I've seen a few in my area not quite that old but not new, and I'm thinking of buying one.
    Anything you can think of that's wrong with these rifle that I should be aware of? I already own a Mosin Nagant and that thing's a beast. Plan on getting an old M1 Garand too if anyone has anything to say about those. I've Shot a few and they're nice but I haven't shot many rounds out of them.
     
  2. Turbodc2

    Turbodc2 Well-Known Member
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    I haven't owned an m14 (m1a1 civi style) but I have a fair amount of rounds through them. In my opinion, they seem to shoot OK, combat accuracy is fine. I personally don't like the exposed action from a reliability standpoint, however if you keep it clean, no real worries. In my opinion, there are better options for a 308 rifle of this type. AR-10 or similar would be a better choice all around, however some people just like the style of the M1a1, and if that's the case, that's fine, but the AR-10 just offers more for similar money, typically speaking. Easier to mount optics, plentiful trigger options, can change uppers quickly for different barrel lengths/ optics/ caliber configurations, more muzzle device options, cheaper mags, faster mag changes, and more reliability.
     
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  3. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    The M1A/M14 type rifles are expensive for what they are.

    So too is the M1 Garand.

    Good grief....so too is the 1903 Springfield bolt action expensive for what it is.

    They are fine shooting rifles if you get one in good shape....and the ammunition is commonly available coast to coast in America.

    But they are all expensive.


    I have opted for one of these...in .308 Winchester.


    http://www.mossberg.com/category/series/mvp-series/mvp-patrol/

    These rifles will feed from M1A/M14 magazines in .308 caliber...also from Magpul 10 and 20 round magazines.

    like These...

    https://www.midwayusa.com/product/2...-ruger-precision-rifle-308-winchester-polymer


    But that is your call.

    I just wanted a bolt action rifle with a large capacity magazine...in a common caliber.

    I have an Enfield Rifle in .308 but it is a full sized battle rifle as is the M1A/M14 and the Garand...also the 1902 Springfield rifle...full battle rifles all.

    This Mossberg is lighter and more compact but in a bigger caliber than the .223. It fits the bill nicely and is less expensive than those you listed.
    Better on the recoil/shoulder than my Enfield too.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris


    Not an Ishmaelite
     
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  4. arctic bill

    arctic bill Expert Member
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    I own an norinco m-14, it is not a true m-14 as it is just an semi auto no selector switch, but i am told by expects that you do not what to fire an m-14 on full auto as you can not keep it down.
    Norinco M14 Review
    by Adriel Michaud on July 9, 2012 in Rifle Reviews

    a29e6ca7a756a19c742b934c54f7208b.jpeg

    Designed around the time of World War II, The Norinco M14 is a reproduction of the original semiautomatic firearm. Commonly issued to Allied troops it uses a medium caliber bullet. Retired from combat service long-ago in favor of lighter weight, smaller caliber rifles, the M14 design is now popular with hunting and sport shooting enthusiasts. Here in Canada, magazines are limited to 5, although I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that Borque illegally modified his magazines to get them to full capacity. Magazines are very simple devices, making 5 round limits practically impossible to enforce on determined psychos or criminals. The majority of this rifle is almost boring in functionality. It uses the same cartridge and is similar in firing speed to something like a Browning BLR.

    Notice that you’re on a hunting gear website. The Norinco M305/M14S is a popular hunting rifle here because it uses a cartridge common in hunting and is generally reliable. The Mosin Nagant and SKS are other military rifles that now enjoy “retirement” with hunters and paper target shooters across Canada. The sad reality is that rifles, even ones designed in 1954, are far superior in use to pistols. Borque could have used that BLR, a Winchester 30-30, or any one of many other common hunting rifles and had the same results.

    I recently wrote an article on Canadian gun stats and if you’re looking for a less biased overview (pretty much everyone who writes on this topic is biased in some way, including me), I’d encourage you to give it a ski
     
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  5. arctic bill

    arctic bill Expert Member
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    Now as to the garand I would love to own one but the price is just to high 2-3 thou , where as the norinco is 5-6 hundred
     
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  6. Dunmaghlas

    Dunmaghlas Well-Known Member
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    That's a pretty good article that I may refer to later for some information.
    Definitely looking at that Norinco now.
     
  7. Dunmaghlas

    Dunmaghlas Well-Known Member
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    How about the Mosin Nagant? Most around here have sold for the $200 to $350 range and it's way too durable.
     
  8. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    The 7.62 x 54 R round is very comparable to the .308 and or the 30.06 round in ballistic tables..and or reloading charts. Also comparable to the 8 mm Mauser.

    I just have no ambition to own another calibration for which to reload and or keep up with ammunition. This is why my Enfield rifle is in .308 caliber and not .303...simple logistics...ammunition availability across this land.

    And I have plenty of .303 bullets which I load into my 7.7mm Japanese Arisaka after forming my own brass from 30.06 brass.

    I just do not want another caliber of which to keep track logistically speaking.

    I had an opportunity to pick up a Tokarev pistol for a very good price from someone needing cash but passed because the ammunition is not commonly available logistically speaking as is ....let us say....45 Long Colt, .45ACP, 9 x 19mm or .38 Special/.357 Magnum. You see??

    Oh...I could have purchased brass and stocked up on tools to reload this calibration but decided to pass on it.



    Now in a rifle ...the 7.62 x 54 mm round is a very respectable performer...no doubt ...

    I know this just by looking at the reloading tables in my Horndy Reloading manual. But again ...another calibration by which to keep track...and stock logistically speaking.

    Also in capable hands the Mosin Nagant is a shooter. I was surprised at the gun club to find out how well a good Mosin Nagant could shoot in good condition with factory ammunition. And this rifle, like many, has passed the test of time.

    For the most part...I agree with the olde gun guru who stated... "Only Accurate Rifles Are Intersting."

    I cannot remember the fellows name who stated this but I agree with the sentiment.


    And with this in mind I have tended to stay away from semi autos. They can use up a lot of ammunition. Same with full autos...can one afford to feed these ammo hungry tools???

    If I want to shoot a lot....I use my 12 gauge shotgun...and get the job done with one or two shots.


    But that is your call.....your monies and your time.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris


    Not an Ishmaelite
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2018
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  9. Colt Eckert

    Colt Eckert Member
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    Garands are the best. I have one via a family member who was in several conflicts. You can't go wrong with one and the 30-06 gets the job done. I also have an M14, the precursor to the M16. Also via a family member. It's been slightly modified though for legal reasons if I remember correctly. Both are grand rifles and nice pieces of history. I use them on those pesky water and two liter soda bottles. (Some steel targets set at a downward angle and across the hill. I'd estimate they are 100 yards)
     
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