Making Camp.

Discussion in 'Natural, Temporary, and Permanent Shelter' started by Keith H., May 4, 2016.

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  1. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I do not like using a tent, in a tent I can't see what is outside, also I am unable to access my camp fire for warmth or cooking without having to leave my bed. I have used natural shelters such as hollow trees, hollow fallen trees, & burnt out termite mounds, but I prefer to use my oilcloth shelter when appropriate. My oilcloth shelter is easy to set up, & doubles as a rain cape. I keep it separate from my blanket roll so that it is easily accessible if I am caught in sudden rain. I can cover myself & my knapsack & sit it out in relative comfort.
    Keith.
    [​IMG]
    This is a wigwam that I set up as a semi-permanent shelter. I only ever camp out in winter, & I only carry one blanket.

     
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  2. Lakeisha Brown

    Lakeisha Brown New Member
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    Wow! This a really good forum. This is such a great alternative to the normal tent set up. I do not camp a lot because I just don't like the vibe of feeling like a bear will come and raid my tent lol.
     
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  3. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I know what you mean Lakeisha, though we do not have any bears in Australia. But many 18th century Living Historians camp this way in America. Even so I like to be able to see what is outside, I also like to keep the fire close to me. Thank you for taking the time to comment Lakeisha, much appreciated.
    Regards, Keith.
    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Lakeisha Brown

    Lakeisha Brown New Member
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    No problem. This is a very interesting forum.
     
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  5. Corzhens

    Corzhens Master Survivalist
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    I have no experience in actual camping except for the informal camping in mountain resorts. But maybe for the sake of this thread, let me try to build my own shelter. First if the beam, it can be a bamboo or any hard branch that would serve as the post and beam. It would be a lean-to so I have to find a rock where my hut can lean to. For the material, banana leaves would be the best but I know that banana doesn't grow in the wilderness. So I have to settle for some big leaves whatever I can find.

    For the warmth at night, maybe a small bonfire will do with the use of big logs if I can manage or maybe big branches. The bonfire is also for protection against wild animals that might harm me at night. Okay, perhaps that would suffice to be called a camp. And what's my grade on that camp I made?
     
  6. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    If you are not carrying an oil cloth, yes using vegetation in layers at a steep angle is the way to go. Don't build your fire too big or it could get out of hand & burn your shelter down. This has been the cause of many deaths in winter camping.
    Keith.
     
  7. bluebetta

    bluebetta Active Member
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    This is fantastic! I camp frequently, but in store-bought tents. Compared to this, that is glamping. You have inspired me to try this. I am actually online shopping for axes and oilcloths now. What fascinating skills you have! Can I ask what you do about insects? Does the campfire smoke deter them? I notice I feel very ill sometimes if I get many bites. I wonder how people in the 18th century survived without mosquito nets. I wish I could follow someone with your skills for a week just to be tutored in technique. You would laugh if you saw me trying to build a fire. The video is very helpful and inspiring. Thank you for making and sharing it.
     
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  8. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I've generally camped in tents, because its traditional and because its easy, but post SHTF I wouldn't use a tent as i'd want to see instantly what is going on around me without having to open the tent flap.
     
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  9. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Campfire smoke will help deter biting insects, but smoke can also attract people. Actually they did have mossie nets in the 18th century. I mostly camp in winter when snakes, spiders & biting insects are not a problem. Camping on higher ground in summer away from water & damp areas there are less biting insects. A good breeze also helps.
    No I don't laugh at people who are learning, we all have more to learn & we have to start somewhere. Practice may not always make perfect, some people are better at some skills than others, but practice will ensure that you become as good as you can be. Given time you will improve & fire lighting is a skill that most people can become proficient in.
    Regards, Keith.
    PS. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me if you think I can help.
    KH.
    http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/search?q=flint+&+steel+fire+lighting
     
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