Micro Hydro Power - Free Electricity?

Discussion in 'Finding, Purifying, and Storing Water' started by Coputere, Jun 16, 2016.

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  1. Coputere

    Coputere New Member
      8/23

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    It may only take up to two gallons a minute just to generate electricity with the micro hydro power system. That is not too strenuous an effort in contrast to being able to deliver electricity to locations whose distance can be up to a mile away.

    Functioning as a ‘run-of-river’ type of system, Microhydro power can utilize the passing water that is going through your generator and then have it redirected back to your water source in a way that barely impacts the environment.

    If your site is producing significant excess then the electric energy is still valuable to surrounding power companies.

    This means that you can end up being paid by the power company that are more than willing to buy the electricity overflow back from you.

    Price Range- $1,000-$20,000

     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2016
  2. Endure

    Endure Expert Member
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    I'm not entirely convinced by this setup, the rpm is pretty low and I think He should modify the pipe to funnel water faster in order to take more advantage of the energy gain by transforming mechanic effort into electric power. I don't think He obtains much Power with this setup, enough maybe to light bulbs and to
    turn on a low profile computer .
     
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  3. joshposh

    joshposh Expert Member
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    The RPMs does seem a bit slow, but there are new highly efficient alternators on the market. There are models out there that can put out 12 volts at 130 revolutions a minute. I like the effort he set forth and until he hooks it up to a volt meter, the jury is still out.

    This website is all about wind and hydro power and off the grid living.

    http://www.windbluepower.com/
     
  4. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    water wheels used to be a common sight in this country, sadly they are few and far between these days.
    got a friend who has a mini water wheel on her property, it provides some of her electric needs but not much.
     
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  5. SirJoe

    SirJoe Expert Member
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    How much energy does it produce? I think that it should be more water tight, what will happen if the water level rises?
     
  6. crimsonghost747

    crimsonghost747 New Member
      8/23

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    If you have a river in your property then this is a pretty decent idea. It's sure to be working 24/7 and it will last longer than solar panels, and with a bit of knowledge you'll be able to fix it yourself if there are any issues. So yeah, if the river is there then this is definitely not a bad idea.
     
  7. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    A good flow of water piped to a wheel to turn a alternator or generator is great that 12 volt output power alot of things off a deep cycle battery then add a invertor and have 110 power these would need a good xteady flow to keep battery at level for invertor to work without drawing battery down often but with 12 volt light and refridgeration is possible
     
  8. joshposh

    joshposh Expert Member
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    I did see a video on a homesteader that lived off the grid and had only 1 deep cycle battery and a solar panel. He made his appliances and lights in his house work because he never inverted the free energy back to 110 - 220 volts (AC). He kept it all DC and replaced his appliances with DC powered appliances. His microwave and small cooler (not a full size refrigerator) was all DC.

    When it comes to off the grid living we need can't just stop at water wheels and solar panels. Our electric sources has changed and now our appliances and lighting fixtures have to change as well.

     
  9. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Coleman makes a fine 12volt cooler for under 100 bucks mines 20 years old still works fine
     
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  10. DecMikashimota

    DecMikashimota New Member
      8/23

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    I have been wondering for quite some time if it would be possible to use a system that will automate current in a still water tank with pumps and other equipment to get the same effect.

    Maybe it doesn't make sense because you would most likely have to plug up the automated system by using already sustainable electricity, but someone should create something along these lines if it is doable.
     
  11. My3Sons_NJ

    My3Sons_NJ New Member
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    While the setup listed in forum might be adequate for a small/medium homestead in a mild climate, I suspect that it would not be feasible for a large majority of people even if they currently have a source of running water on their property. First, devices such as an AC/Microwave/Refrigerator can cause a significant surge in the power usage that could dwarf the current supply of electricity available. Second, times of drought could severely reduce the flow rate of water in a stream (or even dry it up completely) limiting the electricity that could be generated. Third, in northern climates, rivers/streams freezing over is a common occurrence so it would be inefficient in this case as well.
     
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  12. Coputere

    Coputere New Member
      8/23

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    That is true. It is obvious that it can use some work. Thank you for your suggestions. I do think that all of you have really good ideas.
     
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