More On "assault" Firearms. Here Are My Two.

Discussion in 'Guns, Knives, Tools, Etc.' started by Keith H., Oct 28, 2018.

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  1. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I thought the post by watcherchris was interesting, so in the same vane, here are my favourite two :)
    Keith.
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    The fusil is .62 caliber & the pistol is .70 caliber, but both can use the .60 caliber round ball patched or just with wads or wadding & both can digest shot & ball in one load or just shot; bird shot or buckshot.
     
  2. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    I will repeat the story that everyone has heard. During WWI, trench warfare and all that hell, the Germans thought that they were under machine-gun attack when in truth, it was the British using their Lee-Enfields in volley fire.
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    The bolt actions are soooooooo smooth that one can "flip"/"slap" the bolt back. Also, the bolt cocks on opening, not on closing as does the Mauser / most bolts. Brilliant! These are my precious ones. And let me say that a 2 minute of angle rifle is sufficient to the abilities of most men. I have one minute of angle rifles, however I wouldn't consider them my first choice if my bacon was in serious danger. Give me a Enfield. Even give me a lever. These Enfields take two 5-round stripper clips to provide 10 rounds of ammo in their magazines. The .303 cartridge is sufficient to the task, believe history on this one. That wood forend comes in more than handy when its barrel gets hot. Ever burned your hand on a barrel? Man-oh-man have I ever gotten a wake-up call from a barrel -- too, the forend wood furniture keeps heat waves from screwing-up your sight picture.

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    A school mate of mine spent decades living in Australia. On his temporary return to the States, we had opportunity to talk and at length. He related the story of his having owned a semiautomatic rifle. Well this older gent out-fired him / killed more feral hogs when they went hunting. What did the seasoned hunter use?! Yep, an Enfield in .303.
     
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  3. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    Here in the USA, cap'n'ball (black powder) six-shooter revolvers are very popular. A Colt Walker .44 was powerful; it put 40+ grains of black powder behind a .44 ball. Velocities can reach, even exceed, 1000 ft/sec.
     
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  4. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    LOL LOL LOL!!!!


    Wow Keith H.

    That is a "Big" hole in the barrel of that "Assault Pistol."


    On the other hand....even my Ishapore Enfield can be cycled faster than my 1903 Springfield...because of what the Olde Geezer aptly explained about the mechanical workings of this rifle.

    Mine is calibrated in .308 Winchester by choice as this ammunition is more easily available here than the .303 British round.

    I also roll my own ammunition for .308.

    But even the Ishapore Enfield is quite capable in the trained hands.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris

    Not an Ishmaelite
     
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  5. poltiregist

    poltiregist Expert Member
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    has anyone on here have experience making their own black powder from natural materials ?
     
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  6. arctic bill

    arctic bill Expert Member
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    you can try, sulfur powder ,charcoal ground up, saltpeter, mix all together without creating a spark, that is the hard part.
     
  7. arctic bill

    arctic bill Expert Member
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    I
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    A British sergeant instructor with the Royal Scots Fusiliers trains a recruit on how to fire the SMLE Mk III Lee–Enfield in prone position, 31 August 1942.
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    The Lee–Enfield bolt action rifle is known for its smooth operation and often associated with the Mad Minute.
    The Mad Minute was a pre-World War I bolt-rifle speed shooting exercise used by British Army riflemen, using the Lee–Enfield service rifle
    also have a 303 , the british did this type of firing called the mad minute ,
     
  8. Oldguy

    Oldguy Expert Member
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    Sorry but the SMLE cocks on closing, it can also be cocked, half cocked and decocked with the bolt closed.
    One can carry the SMLE with a round chambered and at half cock quite safely and all it needs is the firing pin to be pulled back to full cock for it to be ready to fire. The number four was the best!:D
     
  9. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Yes, I made my own charcoal but purchased the sulfur & potassium nitrate. Works just fine. Remember to mix the ingredients wet. You can use urine instead of water if you wish.
    More on my blog here: https://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/2016/03/about-gunpowder-gutenberg-file.html

    https://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/2016/04/backwoods-gunpowder-making.html

    https://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/2011/02/gunpowder-muzzle-loading-guns.html

    https://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/2011/08/muzzle-loading-information.html
    Keith.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2018
  10. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    You mix it wet Bill, then you don't have to worry about sparks.
    Keith.
     
  11. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    There are actually three kinds of explosive gun powder, Black, White and Red. The black is the strongest but the White and red will work for hunting and are a little less easy to set off.

    As Keith said, mix it wet then break it up with a wooden roller on a wooden board and sift through a sieve to get the different grades. Salt peter is sold as stump remover.

    It is a good skill to know but isn't something I would do on a regular basis. Gun Powder is explosive and dangerous to have around if you don't know how to store it. SMOKELESS gunpowder on the other hand is NOT an explosive. It is a combustible and little different from having a can of gasoline around your house. I also know how to make nitroglycerin but am not crazy enough to do it.

    The old Anarchist Cookbook was quite educational as was The Poor Man's James Bond, Abby Hoffman's STEAL THIS BOOK and a few other old favorites...and that is how I KNOW that the government has looked at me.

    Your flint locks sure are pretty! I like the old guns. The WW1 and WW2 bolt action military rifles were tough and deadly. I have several and have owned even more over the years.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2018
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  12. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    Oh crap, I think you are correct. Mine are locked back in a safe I only open every so often. Your post tells me I've not spent enough time playing with my old rifles. Where I'm living now has its closest outdoor range a bit of a drive away and that has slowed me down in exercising the "put-back" collector type toys. I also need to get out there and burn up some ancient ammo -- ammo that is still safe, yet should be shot up for practice.

    Thanx for reminding me, clearing out the cobwebs in my skull.
     
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  13. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    I've not had any black powder here in years and years. I've pretty much switched to Pyrodex.

    As Texdanm aptly stated...Black Powder is an explosive.


    Anarchist Cookbook....Wow!!!

    Thanks for the trip down memory lane Texdanm. I have two copies of that book. I am told it is no longer in print...even banned from circulation. My friend out in Tennessee, the Ham Radio, gave me his copy before he moved. I reckon he did not want to haul it out there.

    I too recognized it as reference material...good for reading...

    Not recommended to be playing around with that stuff.

    At one time I did a lot of reading from Paladin Press....off the beaten path stuff...about which no one wanted us to be thinking...or knowing.



    I've taken enough chances and done stupid stuff in this shipyard....no need to add to stupid with that book.




    Some years later ...after growing out of the Paladin Press stage...I joined the National Guard...Army ...towed 155mm Artillery.

    First time I ever got to see what was actually in an artillery powder bag.

    If they did not want the shell to go that far they would remove one of the five bags in the charge. There were five bags in the green bag we used. There was also a white bag...more powerful than the green bag .

    The one bag removed would be put in a small pit we dug when setting up the gun.

    At the end of our shooting session the bags collected in this pit would be removed to a safe location ..cut open and spread in a line along the ground and set on fire.

    Now that stuff...powder...looked like elbow macaroni....like you could boil it and add the cheese and be good to go....but it had a slightly green tint to it but burned really hot...with a wall of fire some 5 plus feet in the air...really hot and fast.
    I recognized it from the reloading I was learning to do...extruded nitrocellulose powder..with the hole in the middle to aid in burning rate.

    Shooting artillery and the occasional fright experience in that took my zest out of taking a lot of chances...including working in this shipyard.

    When you slam a fused artillery shell for a fire mission into the cannon and the mission gets cancelled...and you have to punch that fused shell out of the barrel..it gives one pause...pucker time. You wonder how well someone made that fuse at the factory??

    A few times like that and you start taking that stuff more serious.

    I don't even get excited about a fireworks display now days.



    Thanks,
    Watcherchris


    Not an Ishmaeliite
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2018
  14. Turbodc2

    Turbodc2 Well-Known Member
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    Very popular? Just out of curiosity how are you measuring the popularity? I can't think of "firearms" that are less popular. I have done just over 3.5 million in my individual sales at my retailer and have sold exactly 1 (that I can recall). They are so unpopular that we only order them now as we won't stock them. Come to think of it, I've never seen one shot on a public range. I could be wrong, I just don't see them as popular by any stretch, at least compared to any other firearms.
     
  15. poltiregist

    poltiregist Expert Member
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    early pioneers went out into the wilderness , gathered up the needed materials and made their own black powder , no store needed . at least that is what I was lead to believe . There are caves around here that was mined for gun powder ingredients during the American civil war . I already have a supply of powder for muzzle loader or rolling my own smokeless powder bullets . Was thinking along the lines of in case of an infinity apocalyptic situation , My group would probably survive but say 30 or 40 years into the apocalyptic situation when the store bought powder is exhausted that ability for my decendants to make black powder would be huge .
     
  16. poltiregist

    poltiregist Expert Member
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    Texdanm you mentioned the federal boys keeping tabs on you . I think they have quite monitering me but for years they even sent me a postcard every Christmas . I occasionally talked to them , they were actually good people simply doing their job . My unusual military background plus some of my other civilian activeties scared them pretty bad .
     
  17. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    Very popular among those who do not want to go through a government body-cavity exam to exercise their rights as human beings.
     
  18. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    I'm glad this is not a registration state when buying used or from a private owner.

    I've bought a number of such tools from private sales via members at the gun club. Check the bulletin board every time I go for interesting tools.

    Thanks,
    Watcherchris

    Not an Ishmaelite
     
  19. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Cap and ball revolvers are popular in certain areas. I have seen shot and owned them. In the Cowboy type shooting things they are still popular and traditionalists first choice. I had a Ruger old army cap and ball revolver for a while. It was nice but mine was made in the two hundredth year of American freedom and a collector made me an offer that I couldn't say no to.

    When I was younger I had a lot of' "questionable" acquaintances. I was raised in Klan country and was associated with a militia for a while. I know for a fact that the Feds gave me a pretty good look. I didn't make any effort to hide me interests in things that go boom and bang. Right after the Boston bombing I down loaded another copy of the Anarchist Cookbook before they took it down. That was my third copy. Soldier of Fortune Magazine used to be a good way to get looked at and having as many merc friends as I did was "suspicious". In the end they figured out that I was not a revolutionary nor a terrorist. I just look at knowledge as worth having even in these areas. The late 60s and early 70s were a very turbulent times for a lot of people.
     
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  20. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Soldier of Fortune magazine....LOL LOL LOL.....

    Yes indeed!! It seems a lot of us went that route to get information and ideas off the beaten path...Information someone does not necessarily want us to know.


    You remember those books...

    Forgive....Forget it.

    How to get even...

    Screwed!!


    Come to find out after reading a few....many of those ideas were from former law enforcement types....and or feds...

    No wonder they never want us to know much ...like mushrooms in the dark.

    I got my first set of factory lock picks from a Soldier of Fortune site...but can make them by hand if so needed.

    There were a lot more books in the Paladin Press library I found of interest...but have since moved on to deeper topics and thought lines.

    Soldier of Fortune...I've not seen a copy in years and years now. Not even sure it is being published today.

    Any members know if this is so..being published.??


    Thanks Texdanm...for the trip down memory lane.

    Watcherchris

    Not an Ishmaelite
     
  21. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    My dad's lot, brothers/friends, were on both sides of the law.

    I had a family member who fought the NAZIs, but was a Klan supporter. Go figure. My dad wouldn't let the "N" word be said in our home. Go figure -- he was raised in a family of aggressive bigotry. Of course he really hated NAZIs -- they almost killed him on multiple occasions. That would kinda put me on the opposition, just saying. F the NAZIs!

    Cap'n'ball revolvers work. A friend of mine blew his brains out with one. Talk about terminal ballistics.

    A lot of folk in the American South are big into black powder everything. The re-enactors are of course, but also hunters, whoever else. I've been extraordinarily tempted to by a black powder revolver. I came VERY close to buying a Ruger black powder six-shooter.
     
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