My "assault " Lever Rifles And "assault " Pistols

Discussion in 'Guns, Knives, Tools, Etc.' started by watcherchris, Oct 28, 2018.

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  1. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    In view of the latest shooting and followed by the same olde "Usual Suspects" coming out of the woodwork calling for more gun control...and with predictability....it was time for me to get my shots in.


    Working out in the garage and I got this inspiration and decided to post photos of my "Assault" lever rifle and matching "Assault" Pistol.


    This first rifle is calibrated in .357 Magnum. I decided long ago that I wanted a new one...
    The pistol is a .357 Magnum by Ruger..the GP 100 "Assault " pistol.

    I made a bad decision and let my previous Rossi "Assault" Lever rifle go.

    Took me a few years to get a replacement.

    152ceeb6e788eb8c4e8724dd6c9f09b7.jpeg





    And here is my second "Assault" lever rifle and matching "Assault" pistol...

    They are both Henry Brand "Assault " lever rifles...and matching pistol calibrations.

    This one being calibrated in .41 Magnum...for both pistol and rifle.

    I always wanted to have such an set up with pistol and rifle in the same calibration. This is a surprisingly accurate pistol for what it is...single action in .41 Magnum.

    152ceeb6e788eb8c4e8724dd6c9f09b7.jpeg

    Again .."Assault" lever rifle matching the pistol in calibration.


    Here is a close up of this .41 Magnum Blackhawk Assault pistol...

    152ceeb6e788eb8c4e8724dd6c9f09b7.jpeg


    Remember at the voting booth.................


    If you cannot be trusted with a gun....you will never be trusted with a vote.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris

    Not an Ishmaelite
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2018
  2. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Great sets of toys
     
  3. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Saw a video article about the Henry in .41 mag. It's got little recoil and all of the killing power of a .44 mag. The .41 mag case capacity and bore diameter just happen to be more efficient to the task -- the .41 uses less powder to get the same energies of the .44 mag. .

    Where I'm from, many hunters use tree stands for short-range deer hunting. Just the .41 mag handgun would be sufficient. The rifle would get one some extra range, however if you are in the woods and the deer is just 25 or 50 yards away, gimme a break, just take the revolver -- less weight and trouble climbing to your tree stand. A dead deer is a dead deer is supper on the table / meat in the freezer.
     
  4. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Here is a couple of my reloads in .41 Magnum.

    I am certain Olde Geezer....you can quickly note the important characteristics of what these two loadings are capable.

    500558470369e7fec7213a804c86bf87.jpeg


    This is the first reload on which I have ever used a gas check bullet. it works surprisingly well in keeping down the leading in the barrel.

    On the left a 250 grain wide flat nosed cast gas check/WFNGC

    And on the right a copper plated semi wad cutter at 210 grains of weight.

    Either one represents a significant mass in moving weight/energy delivery.

    I wanted the cast gas check in particularly for heavy duty uses...big boned...thick skinned.

    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2018
  5. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    I love the lead bullet with gas-check. A lot of folk say that gas-checks almost eliminate leading -- even with bullets that are not alloyed to be hard lead. I wish that more folk were aware of this simple yet profoundly effective little disk of copper.

    Talk about delivering energy, I'd call it "The Hammer"!

    Some critter gettin' nailed with that bad boy, wouldn't be going far afterwards, if anywhere at all. Lights out!

    Me, I'm sticking with my .357 toys, however I know full good and well that the .41 mag would be superior. I love shooting single actions. Have owned a few.

    You nail an aggressive human felon with your "Hammer" load -- his soul is gonna be standing in judgement in a heartbeat. Maybe I should say "lack of a heartbeat."
     
  6. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    I agree with Texdanm's assessment. Pound for pound...in a day of all these high capacity semi Auto pistols...the .357 Magnum still stands out there in raw potential/energy for those who know how to use it.

    I am sufficiently impressed with these Wide Flat Nosed Gas Check bullets in .41 Magnum...that I am thinking about ordering more in .357 Diameter...Wide Flat Nosed Gas Checks.

    Here this link....

    http://www.grizzlycartridge.com/index.php?app=ecom&ns=prodshow&ref=CP38180

    These are heavy at 180 grains. Mostly I shoot about 158 grain...but like this bullet too in gas check.

    Thinking about ordering 3 boxes to start. Should be able to deliver some serious energy in a revolver or rifle in .357 Magnum calibration.

    This would make for some interesting reloading.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
     
  7. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    The 41 mag was the best of the three magnum pistol rounds. The 357 mag and the 44 mag were actually just over loaded specials. the 38 special and the 44 special were both in existence before they were loaded into a magnum level. In reality the 357 mag and the 44 mag are only longer by 1/10th of an inch so you can't load them into a gun chambered for the special version. Both of those magnums are basically just +P+ rounds.

    The 41 mag was developed from scratch and really is superior to either the 357 or the 44 mags because of a better balance of case capacity and bullet weight. When I used to load for power and best accuracy for my 357 mag I actually loaded in midway 38 special brass. This made it a compressed load and the burn was extremely uniform making it very accurate. I never did it but I imagine the same would have been true of the 44. The 41 is the only one that actually is designed to take full advantage of the case size.

    A warning is needed here. I loaded these for MY personal use and used yellow midway 38 special brass for this. The rest of my 38 special loads were all nickel plated cases. You do NOT want to use one of these loads in a light framed 38 special. I wouldn't even use them in a heavy framed 38 special that was +P certified or even a K framed S&W 357 magnum. There were ultra hot loads best shot in Thompson Center pistols, 357 mag Ruger Blackhawks, Ruger Security 6s, Model 28 N frame S&W and very limited use in the L frame S&Ws.
     
    watcherchris likes this.
  8. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    The .38 special had a longer case than the .38 S&W and the .38 Colt so that no one would chamber the higher pressure cartridge in the older revolvers incapable of safely firing it. Same for the .357 mag. vs. .38 special. Were one to fully load the .357 case with the same powder normally used, the revolver could come apart and violently so. The .357 mag. has 2x to over 3x the energy of a .38 special / .38 special +P. The .38 special simply can't compete with the .357 mag. in the realm of nailing a human into the land of "can't return fire" (maybe not ever again). Heaven only knows how many eastern whitetail deer have been put into freezers with the 357.

    The .41 mag case capacity vs. powder required is much more efficient than the .44 mag. Short story is that over the long haul, one can save a lot of powder with the .41 mag and get the same job done as with the .44 mag. The .357 isn't in the same league as the .41 or .44 mag. revolvers. The .357 mag. has a long track record in the realm of bringing down humans. Using a larger revolver is usually not needed. Sometimes .44 mag or .41 mag rounds sail through a human without opening-up. Therefore, defense loads for these big bores differ from hunting loads.

    Law enforcement loved the .41 mag. due to its ability to cut right into a car or truck back in the days when vehicles were made with real steel. I remember a story from back in the 1970s where a highway patrolman nuked a fellow in a big delivery van. Cop made the shot while in chase and the bullet went through the back, through a item of cargo, through the seat's metal back and cushion, on into the fleeing felon.

    Back in the 1930s when the .357 mag. came out for law enforcement agencies, it was loaded hot and with FMJ bullets. This was for the purpose of penetrating vehicles. These were large frame revolvers that chambered the .357 mag.
     
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  9. Duncan

    Duncan Expert Member
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    I had a Smith Model 686 -- a .357 Magnum double action revolver with a 4" barrel. Why I sold it I'll never know. Ever since then I'd thought of the same kind of rig mentioned here -- revolver and lever-action carbine -- only in .357 rather than .41 (the availability of .38 spl is a good thing, IMNHO).

    However, as of right now, my only handgun is a Ruger 9e autoloader in 9 mm, and I'm not going to spend any more money until The Boss says I can, which is after both the goat-shed and the chicken coop get built (and probably after she trades the Honda Civic in on an Subaru Outback)!
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2019
  10. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Stopped in Bass Pro today and purchased two bags of 100 count each of .38 Special Starline brass unprimed. I put them away for now.

    The clerk told me they were having difficulty getting .357 Magnum Brass...of late. Hope this bottleneck soon is solved.

    But .38 Special is fine if you know how to both use and reload it. Also it works fine in this lever action.

    Also bought two nylon Web slings for these two "Assault Lever Rifles."

    Got to thinking it was about time I got slings for them. Paid cash for all.

    Also stopped at Wally World and picked up a second batch of .22 Long rifle Thunderbolts in two 500 round boxes and put them away ..again paying cash.

    Thinking about switching my bullet selection/purchases now to 200 grain .358 Remington round nosed or spire point bullets to use in my Thompson Contender barrel.....35 Remington.
    Time to stock up on these supplies....though I can load this caliber with .357 Magnum bullets as well....but they tend to be on the light side for this calibration.


    By the way Duncan. The S&W 686 is a very good design..as so many other companies are copying it. I like it in the 6 inch barrel.

    Agree ...the availability of .38 Special as well as .357 Mangum is a big draw of these designs.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris

    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2019
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  11. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Wow Olde Geezer..

    You got my gray matter going into overdrive and I pulled out my Handloaders Manual of Cartridge Conversions and learned something I knew not a few minutes before referring to these pages.

    There were several .38 Caliber cartridges in times past for which we hardly think about today outside of the .38 Special and or the .357 Magnum.

    I am seeing listings for a .38 Colt Long and also to my surprise a .38 Colt Short. Also the .38 Smith and Wesson...and of course the .38 Special.

    Also Olde Geezer..and to my surprise...what today is called the .357 Maximum...is not new. There were versions of it in the olde days with cases just as long as the .357 Maximum.

    I think the significance today is the larger variety of powder, primers and bullet selection.

    But it is interesting to note that the .357 Maximum is not a new concept.

    There are calibers of .38 diameter cartridges of which I've never heard before purchasing this book. It is like a walk down history lane...so to speak.

    Thanks for getting the gray matter going.

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite
     
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  12. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    I love lever action rifles, and wheel guns. I guess I can attribute it to my love of the Old West. Having a set of same caliber rifle and pistol makes eminent sense. Especially, when that caliber will work effectively on just about anything you would need to shoot in North America. I see carrying one type of ammo a distinct advantage.
     
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  13. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    I agree with Morgan101. I like the 357 cartridge for a lever action rifle, because the same caliber in a pistol is easier to control. If you can't bring it down with a long barreled lever action 357, don't shoot at it.
     
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