Raising Guinea Pigs

Discussion in 'Animal Husbandry' started by John Snort, Jun 23, 2016.

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  1. John Snort

    John Snort Well-Known Member
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    Most think of them as pets but they aren't considered pets in some parts of the world. In South America, these "pets" are a delicacy?

    What they taste like? Something like duck and rabbit combined.

    But the matter of taste should be of little interest to someone who wants animals that will provide him with protein. This is how you could raise some guinea pigs:

    You'll need to build at least five pens.

    -One pen should house about 12 breeding females and their unweaned young and one male.
    -A second pen for recently weaned females
    -A third pen for about 15 recently weaned males
    -The fourth pen will be for guinea pigs that are about 2 months old. These can be used for breeding [the females that is, or eaten.
    -The fifth pen will be for male guinea pigs [up to 12 of them] that are between 2 and 4 months old. These you could eat or sell if that's what you want.

    As you see within two months you'll have a large number of guinea pigs which could provide you with enough food for your family.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2016
  2. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    they are considered a delicacy in Peru I believe, and I have seen film of them running around the houses under people feet.
     
  3. John Snort

    John Snort Well-Known Member
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    It's time people started of them as more than just pets. The time might come [even if there's no disaster or apocalyptic event] when people will have to breed animals for food and as these can feed only kitchen scraps I suppose anyone can raise them without worrying about the extra money they might need to buy their guinea pigs food.
     
  4. My3Sons_NJ

    My3Sons_NJ New Member
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    If anything, raising a large number of guinea pigs would ensure that my three cats would not starve. Given their propensity to breed, it should provide an adequate food supply but you could achieve the same end goal with rabbits, which are meatier and, probably, taste better.
     
  5. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    yes they have been on my radar for meat animals along with rabbits and poultry for a long time.
     
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  6. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    most, if not all, domestic cats would go feral after SHTF.
     
  7. Endure

    Endure Expert Member
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    Hamsters, Chinchillas, Guinea Pigs. All those small critters look almost the same to me, Guinea pigs being chubbier, I can see why use them as food. They breed outrageously fast,since Guinea pigs may become sexually active at an age of 1 month. Under improved conditions, the animals are used for breeding at an age of 3 months when they have a weight of at least 600g. One male is sufficient for a group of 12 females. Pregnancy lasts about 68 days and after that 1 to 4 young ones are born. Within half an hour after having given birth, the female comes in heat and can be served again. In this way a female can produce about 5 litters with in total 10 to 15 young pigs per year.

    You can feed with kitchen wastes and agricultural by-products and although feeding is adequate, their productivity is low. Vegetables and fruit roughage showed good prospects for effective feeding.
     
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  8. joshposh

    joshposh Expert Member
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    I'm not opposed to the idea. It is a source of protein. Not sure if they produce like rabbits, but still a option to explore.
     
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