Shortwave Radio And Communications

Discussion in 'Other Useful Objects' started by Alaskajohn, Jun 22, 2019.

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  1. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Expert Member
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    The good news and bad news for me is that I live a long way from the cities tucked away in a large valley surrounded by 8-10,000 feet mountains. There is a lone cell tower that provides decent cell service. There are certainly no cable services, and the high mountains make satellite dishes very problematic. My contact with the world is dependent on the cell tower. I was going to take the general ham radio exam and put in a ham radio when I first moved here, but the old homesteader who ran a repeater passed away a few years ago and the repeater shut down. So HAM is not an option for gathering news from the world.

    I purchased Tescun PL-880 and a wire antenna extension and I can pick up a few short wave stations throughout the day. I’m impressed with the unit after taking it outside of my valley and being able to hear what’s available from the world outside my valley. I’m very reluctant to put up a tall antenna for OPSEC reasons, and not sure if even the highest ones would improve my predicament. The antenna wire extension is about 25 feet long. Would getting a longer one improve my reception?

    For those of you who are isolated from the world, what are your plans on learning what’s happening if things turn to crap?

    Anyone have thoughts on what I could do to improve my situation?
     
  2. Caribou

    Caribou Expert Member
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    Setup your own repeater on a ridge line with a view of Anchorage or Fairbanks or your other nearest large community. Did the repeater quit because someone removed it or did the battery die? If it is still in place you might be able to put in a solar panel and new batteries. Setup your antenna and your solar panel high enough that the snow will be removed by the wind.

    I had a remote cabin with a wide open beach and mile of clear flat water to broadcast across. Unfortunately, all the people lived in the other direction and on the other side of a mountain that my signal just wouldn't get through. Higher and larger antennas didn't help.

    You might be able to bounce a signal half way around the world with ham but that won't help get out to anyone relatively close.
     
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  3. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Expert Member
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    I am sure I can find out where the repeater is. If I can get it up and running I might be in business. The guy who ran it passed away about 4 years ago, so I can only guess at this stage what the situation is with the equipment. We don’t get sun for about 45 days a year, so I have reservations about solar. But I’ll cert look into it if the repeater I high up enough on a south facing mountain that gets sun year round.
     
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  4. Sourdough

    Sourdough "ALASKAN"
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    Last edited: Jun 22, 2019
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  5. GateCrasher

    GateCrasher Expert Member
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    My advice would be to experiment until you find something that works for you in your location. Cop-out I know, but if there was a definitive answer for the best antenna there wouldn't be so many ham and DX'er forums, blogs, magazines, etc.

    Receive antennas don't require any impedance matching like those for transmit, and in general the longer the wire and the higher it is, the better the reception. The HF ham and broadcast SW stations typically use horizontal polarization, so laying your antenna out horizontally should get better reception but even that's not always the case.

    If you have any scrap wire of any length lying around like old extension cords, romex electrical wire, speaker wire, etc I'd start with that and try a horizontal dipole as high up as you can place it. Attic maybe? The Tescun PL-880 has a 3.5mm jack for the SW antenna, so something like this to connect to the antenna jack on the radio:

    https://www.amazon.com/MyCableMart-Right-Female-Adapter-Cable/dp/B01N51QBRH

    And the BNC end connected to this:

    https://www.amazon.com/CESS-Binding-Coaxial-Splitter-Connector/dp/B01FPW2BNG

    Then twist-tighten two equal lengths of the scrap wire to the red/black posts on that adapter and lay them out in different directions.
     
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  6. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Alaska John,

    I run both HF and also VHF/UHF here on the ham bands.

    I have made the trip to Alaska on the 12 meter band or 24.890 MHZ to 24.990 MHZ. on USB mode. to a station outside of Juneau.


    The antenna I am using here in Virginia for Ham on the HF bands is a 500 foot roll of black Insulated 12 gage wire from Lowes and fed by ladder line....through a tuner. I have an extra roll of this wire put back in my garage for emergencies along with two G5RV antennas.
    This antenna is set up in a wire loop configuration.

    I can also hook up my short wave set here at home....to this 500 foot wire antenna...though my Yaesu FT 890 will pick up most of the Short wave band covered on my Tecsun 660 set.

    I have another Tecsun 660 in a locker at work...and have a 40 foot wire antenna concealed for my usage and hook it up directly to the telescoping antenna. I monitor the ham and short wave bands for information when not busy...my boss can get in touch with me via cell phone if needed. I also keep a VHF/UHF walkie talkie in my locker at work along with two spare batteries for it. Also keep in my pocket daily ...four AA batteries available for my Mag Lite and shortwave set.

    Much of my electronic gear I try to purchase around a common battery type...AA Batteries. Buy them by the 40 pack.

    Sounds like where you are at ...HF radio would serve you best ..without having a VHF/UHF repeater available.

    Good repeaters can get complex to keep and maintain..and also expensive...difficult if they go down and the weather is rough...

    Oh...my Ham HF radios have been modified to transmit on the CB bands as well...if needed. I have 4 such HF rigs so modified.

    Also keep several olde car batteries around on trickle chargers for DC power if needed.


    Alaska John...I am in a city on the coast of Virginia..but am well aware how dependent people are on land lines and or cell phones. I try not to count on them too much though they are convenient. I just make myself alternatives should the phone systems go down. Same should this computer go down.

    This is also why I try to keep up my Morse code skills.....CW. For CW/morse code can often get through when band conditions are very rough...albeit slower....but it can often get through.

    Have full HF/VHF/UHF and even 6 meters in my truck...via a Yaesu FT 100 d. CB band modified too.


    Hope this helps.


    Watcherchris

    Not an Ishmaelte.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2019
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  7. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Oh...Alaska John...I forgot to add....this 500 foot black insulated 12 gage wire from Lowes was fed up into the tops of the trees in my yard via a salt water boat fishing pole.....25 lb line on it. I ran a three ounce tear drop sinker on the line and cast it over the tops of the trees. Then I hauled up several lengths of 1/8th diameter nylon rope...tied together end to end. When I had enough rope...I tied the 12 gauge wire to the rope and hauled it up into the trees where I needed it. It is a triangle loop in the shape of this property and varies in height with the various trees in this yard from 50 to some 75/80 feet in height. The feed point with the ladder line is some 70 feet in the air.

    This cycle of hauling up the rope..then the black 12 gage wire was repeated until I was satisfied and the loop completed.

    There are pulley in certain sections to help distribute the weight and tension....evenly ...making it remain longer without undue stress on the set up.

    Hope this too helps.

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite
     
  8. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Expert Member
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    Watcherchris and Gatecrasher, I’m going to give your suggestions a go. Wire isn’t expensive so this is something I can try before the summer is out.

    Should the wire be away from a structure such as a cabin or shed, or does this not make a difference?

    IBME, I’ve not had a lot of luck with the satellite phones from my place, but a hike up the southern side of the mountains to the north give me a connection to a satellite. It could have been an issue with the sat phone. It was issued to me by a firm I was affiliated with and they wanted to be able to reach folks during emergencies. They may not have been thinking of Alaska when they made the bulk purchase. Most of their affiliates are in lower 48 and south of that.
     
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  9. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Alaska John,

    Correct...wire as compared to other setups is relatively inexpensive. Most of this wire is away from the structure of the house...and high up in the air.. Most important is if you use the longer wave bands...like 160 meters or 75/80 meters...or even 40...you need to have your feed point higher up in the air ..away from any structure..like a building.

    I have no masts at all in my long wire loop. It is entirely supported by the trees on my property. It is simply stretched and supported by the tops of the trees. My feed point higher up in the air is for what I have been striving and making adjustments to get it higher up...for the longer wave bands.

    I often speak with my friend in Tennessee on the 75/80 meter band in the evenings....using microphone...on LSB...a distance of some 400 miles....most nights the copy is good and we seldom run much power. I seldom need to go over 200 watts if I do run power and have been able to make the trip on as little as 30 watts.

    Now John...for some particulars about this set up.

    I have put in this system a type of suspension..to equalize the stress on the lines and also some springs from the hardware store for some give and take. The 1/8 diameter lines holding it up in the air at the three corners...have pulleys on them and the pulleys have springs tied onto the 1/8 nylon rope. The pulleys and springs for some give and take in winds and such. The black insulated 12 gage wire is threaded through the pulleys ...the pulleys are suspended in place with the 1/8th diameter nylon line also from Lowes.

    If you do not put some kind of suspension in this set up you will be working on your system more often as the ropes break or the wire itself. A suspended system with springs or pulleys helps equalize out the stress on the overall system.

    Now up in Alaska ..I am certain that the winter temperatures will be a factor ..and important. I am not sure as to exactly how to factor that in but this description works fine for me here in Virginia.

    Again..hope this helps,


    A very 73 to you and your house,

    Watcherchris

    Not an Ishmaelite
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2019
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  10. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Oh..and once again..before I forget ...I also make my own J pole antennas for dual band....two meters and 440 MHZ from aluminum rod and aluminum angle bar..from the local True Value Hardware store.

    The aluminum rod is 3/8 diameter solid stock and cut to the proper dimensions.

    The great thing about this set up is that it has a very wide frequency response on 2 meters and also 440 MHZ

    Here are the plans...from on line...

    https://kc7hxc.us/links/radio/jpole/build-jpole.html

    I am assuming you have skills with a tap and die set...for tapping the aluminum rod.

    My J poles of this design are fed via LMR 400 coaxial cable.

    Again..hope this helps...and again...

    A very 73 to you and your house.

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite
     
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  11. GateCrasher

    GateCrasher Expert Member
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    Holy SHTF, compensating for something there Watcherchris? Just kidding, that's a monster of an antenna!

    Alaskajohn, I'd just add that keeping the wiring as far away as possible from electrical wiring or appliances as it exits the house might help cut down on interference/noise too. I use one very much like I described in my attic (under wood/shingles) stapled to the rafters and it improves reception for all my receivers over the stock antennas, although nothing like Watcherchris's I'd guess. Mine is closer to 50' long at about 25' high, the scrap wire I used ends in a PL-259 connector and I bought adapters to mate that end to my different radios. An adapter for a 3.5mm plug like yours for my SW radio, a BNC one for connection to a police scanner, and another for bare wire connection to a AM/FM stereo. Even though 50' is too short for a full wave at AM and SW frequencies, and way too long at VHF/UHF frequencies, it greatly improves reception for all my radios over the stock antennas.

    Another thing that might help decrease noise and improve reception is adding ferrite cores around the power cord for the radio (if using AC power for it), and around other appliances in the house that might be putting RF noise on the AC wiring in the house. I have an inverter and generator backup, and adding those made noticeable difference for me, especially when on generator power. https://www.amazon.com/eBoot-Pieces-Ferrite-Suppressor-Diameter/dp/B01E5E5IY4 Good luck!
     
  12. duke in wales

    duke in wales Expert Member
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    The Tecsun is a good little rig. You can have the best radio in the world but your stuffed if your antenna is not up to much.

    If practical try and get a ham license, you will learn a lot. Learn Morse code, its not as hard as some think and its interesting to listen in to stations. A good antenna and good morse skills gets you further, I 'work' the USA from the UK on 5 watts on a regular basis.
     
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  13. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Expert Member
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    One of these days I will get my ham license. I have the study material downloaded. It’s just a lack of time and I haven’t made it a priority. I am slowly accumulating some ham equipment as I find it. I have a morse code book somewhere. The last time I use Morse code I think I got a Boy Scout merit badge, so I definitely have forgotten everything.

    I took the Tescum up the haul road and picked up SW pretty easily on the brooks range. I am enjoying experimenting with it. I certainly understand the importance of the antenna from my military days being deployed to central and South America in the 1980s trying to communicate!
     
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  14. duke in wales

    duke in wales Expert Member
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    Recieving is comparatively easy, the antenna really comes into its own when you want to transmit. Chris mentioned the G5RV, its a dipole antenna, very good they are too and you can pick them up ready made for not a lot of dollars rather then making one at this stage of your step into radio.

    There are a few android apps for morse training and once installed don't need access to the internet.

    PS, don't think in dots and dashes, think in dits and dars.
     
  15. GateCrasher

    GateCrasher Expert Member
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    Would just caution that amateur radio licensing in the US can be an OPSEC issue, depending. If it interests you as a hobby outside of preparedness, or is a requirement for something like CERT or a mutual assistance group that you want to join, then it may be unavoidable but otherwise I'd suggest considering it carefully before deciding. Strictly from a preparedness/survival angle for a family or small group, if you can meet your communication needs without it then I'd skip it - but do study, learn, and practice it regardless as it is an important skill to have imo.
     
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  16. duke in wales

    duke in wales Expert Member
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    What are you worried about? Visible antennas?

    Ham radio is one of the most useful skills any prepper can have and I encourage one and all to train, qualify and use regardless of country.

    I hate that stupid OPSEC thing, really does more harm than good much of the the time :mad:
     
  17. GateCrasher

    GateCrasher Expert Member
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    In the US at least, amateur radio is often closely associated with emergency / disaster preparedness at both the individual and group levels (ARES/RACES and others). The first reason listed as the purpose for amateur radio (Part 97.1(a)) is for providing emergency communication services to the public. "When all else fails, ham radio works" as some hams here like to say. But worse, upon getting licensed the FCC puts the person's call sign, name, and the address provided into a publicly searchable and downloadable database. While someone could give them a PO box or a friend/relative address, if your name is an uncommon one then that may not help hide your identity much. For someone named "Robert Jones" or "John Smith" it may be enough that non-Government people wouldn't know, but not going to fool the Government with just a false address. Anyway, the FCC database is probably the single best source if you wanted a list of people in the US that are most likely preppers/survivalists, so I don't want to be in it.

    By getting licensed you're also agreeing to follow the rules, including no encryption or unidentified (anonymous) transmissions between parties. I personally refuse to agree to that as I see it as a violation of my rights as a US citizen. If caught violating the rules, which admittedly is pretty rare, licensed operators in the US are often treated more harshly and fined (because they should have known better I suppose) than unlicensed operators that are often just given a warning instead.

    In times of war or conflict, radio communications takes on a whole new level of danger. It falls under C3 (Command, Control, and Communications), and each side in the conflict wants to enhance their C3 capabilities and deny its use to their enemy. I don't want my home being listed as a "fixed communication site" on a military planners map. If either imposed a communication blackout, I also don't want a visit so they can confiscate or impound my equipment. Nor do I want to be 'volunteered' to assist (until I know which side I'm on anyway, then I may voluntarily volunteer).

    There's more, but I'm off-topic already. I do agree radio communications is a very useful skill, I just don't want to advertise I have some skill and the equipment to utilize it.
     
  18. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Those that Hate OPSEC, have already given up their freedom and will be the first to get a visit form the Nanny State officials. SIASD
     
  19. duke in wales

    duke in wales Expert Member
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    Cut the crap 'Tactical' (tactical is another word I dislike, put that name on a bit of kit and all of a sudden people think it must be good when often its not); drivel like your statement may impress the gullible but I'm not gullible.

    'OPSEC' is stuck on all sorts of scenarios and is over used and can instill fear in some new to this game, stop people trying new things.

    GateCrasher, I believe your concerns are a tad OTT.

    "By getting licensed you're also agreeing to follow the rules, including no encryption or unidentified (anonymous) transmissions between parties. I personally refuse to agree to that as I see it as a violation of my rights as a US citizen. If caught violating the rules, which admittedly is pretty rare, licensed operators in the US are often treated more harshly and fined (because they should have known better I suppose) than unlicensed operators that are often just given a warning instead. "
    I really don't understand your issues there, ham radio is a hobby so why on earth would you want to send encrypted messages or not use your callsign? Do you really worry about someone looking up your ham address? Chill out mate, your making a mountain out of a molehill.

    I'm very active with the UK RAYNET, we can work with emergency services in times of emergencies.
     
  20. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    People are free to believe or not in OPSEC, Feel free to share your name, number, address and any other information, since OPSEC does not mean anything. As I said, Stupid is as stupid does, feel free to ignore OPSEC, won't cost me anything.

    As for tactical, better than Liberal Sheeple.
     
  21. duke in wales

    duke in wales Expert Member
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  22. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    So it is okay to have OPSEC , when it meets YOUR criteria but over the top when it does not. Liberal Sheeple double talk.
     
  23. duke in wales

    duke in wales Expert Member
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    You need a new phrase 'Liberal Sheeple' is rather tiresome.

    Try and focus, don't bandy about with OPSEC use it when its really needed.

    Watch and take onboard what is said here, its so true
     
  24. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    "Sheeple": definition, people who are docile, foolish and easily led.
    would seem to apply to a lot of people these days!!:p
     
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  25. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Duke in Wales,

    Appreciated the link with terms.....

    Some early AM ramblings:

    The "Bugging Out" military term doesn't mean a retreat or to flee in panic. The author needs a lecture at 19th century Sandhurst.

    Once a BOB contains more than one sleeping bag, it can be called a large quilt cover.

    A BOL can be another home. "Normally", it is not necessarily in a rural area. It could "normally" be on an island in a bay.

    Tobias has limited geographic experience. Tidal flood areas and roads ...... well, If it's not a 4 wheel drive vehicle with a relatively high center of mass, just remain where you are. Plus, a pickup truck has more cargo space than a SUV.

    Several hours darkness from a magnetic storm closing down the electric grid is an enhancement to service. Thank you Dominion Energy, Duke Power, Appalachian Power, ..... Meanwhile, have extra batteries.

    I guess Tobias is not a Yank. "Multi-tool" here usually means the Swiss Army knife and the more modern versions. An EMT scissors can be the expensive model with the extras built in and have multiple functions - but it's not called a multi-tool.

    Peak Oil: After Sandhurst, to American Petroleum Institute ! I'll lecture on the historic Oil Depletion Allowance.

    ......

    Nothing personal against author Tobias. Good work for just getting a list published. Authors know about - or should know about - literary critics - !
     
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  26. duke in wales

    duke in wales Expert Member
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    Good morning Pragmatist

    As you may have gathered I'm not a great fan all these 'terms', I had enough of that nonsense when I served full time.

    Multi-tool in the UK generally refers to something like a Leatherman.

    The article was just the first thing that popped up on a Google search to be honest, most similar articles are a load of tosh.
     
  27. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Duke,

    Well received.
     
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  28. GateCrasher

    GateCrasher Expert Member
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    Maybe, but since I don't enjoy amateur radio as a hobby and refuse to follow some of their rules, I see nothing to gain and only things to lose by getting licensed. Practice now for how you'll be using radio post-SHTF, which for us means keeping our identities, location, and the content of our messages private.
     
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  29. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Alaska John,

    About that repeater you were discussing ...taking it over.

    I don't know if you are aware but most repeaters operate on what is called Duplexing....transmitting on one frequency and receiving on another. They utilize two frequencies....therefore called Duplexing.

    This can be a complex system to maintain..and can get into some monies particularly after restarting from being inoperative for years.


    There are some new generations of repeaters which only use one frequency to receive and transmit...called simplex repeaters...and many people operate them from their homes.

    There is also a system whereby people hook their computers to their repeaters and talk world wide....using the computer linking .....getting into a repeater hooked up to a computer....and linking with another computer linked to a repeater on the other end.

    This technique is called IRLP..or Internet Radio Linking Program...

    It is a way to cover great distances without using HF radio as was done in the olde days. and allows one to use short range radios...even walkie talkies to get into a repeater thus linked.

    I've talked as far as Perth, Australia when I caught the system correctly.


    All that Aside...for me I would rather have HF radio...the olde way....thus I am not dependent to repeaters or too much short range radios.


    It is what you make of it and teach yourself....lots of Hams and or shortwave people out here to help you.


    I started out on CB/Short wave and still listen to short wave today.

    I like my Tecsun PL 880 at work when we are not busy...and also have another here at home in addition to my ham radio.




    As to OPSEC...it is what one makes of it.......


    For myself..I do not like to be "Herded" by anyone...period...persons or government.


    And any one knowing any history....knows that the biggest threat to "Herding" people is government....always and ever.

    This is not a knowledge which will ever be taught to people via government financed public education...they will avoid this arena...and or pattern of thinking and instead resort to ridicule....they are predictable..


    In nations which turn the corner towards socialism...and or dictatorship...they discourage short wave listening and or Hams...and prefer group think..and or "Herding"...not individualism.

    In National Emergencies or wartime...hams are often shut down...this is not often known....by the public...particularly in socialist/dictatorships.


    Historially ..the greatest threat to liberty and freedom has always been government....and thinking people with any perspective on history ..know this...


    In the UK....the system has a way of deceiving their own people in such a nice delicate way ...the English people tend to think it is wonderful. I don't.

    We are not Englishmen here and have no ambition to so become.

    To me Brexit is proof of this ...



    Security versus Opportunity.

    Thinking people would rather have Opportunity than security...they will be responsible for and make their own security....OPSEC....and who or whom they will trust.

    Be warned of Ishmaelites...and or Ishmaelite thinking patterns....Pattern recognition..

    Someone out here is often counting on the concept that our attention spans are short and or that we know more about sports and or television movie distractions...not to be able to see this happening around us. That we know little history as well.

    How about those Kardashians!!!??


    As a rule...Preppers do not want to be herded ...by anyone ..or anything.
    This is why governments or government trained thinking does not approve of them.


    My non Ishmaelite .02,
    Watcherchris
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2019
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  30. duke in wales

    duke in wales Expert Member
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  31. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    I pretty much agree here with GateCcrasher.

    Before I got my Ham License I was on the CB a lot and was basically what one would call a radio pirate....breaking a lot of rules...

    Now that I have a license ...I don't do that and also try not to make a pestillance of myself across the band which Is one reason I quickly tired of the CB bands...too much two legged wildlife operating on there. Don't worry ....it happens on the Ham bands too. It is just that I can go to so many different bands and frequencies ....to get away from said two legged wildlife...day or night. Can also run plenty of power..but do not so do...just enough to make the trip in the mode I am operating.

    I was also taught by the olde operators to make my own antennas...not dependent on store bought antennas and such.

    It is what you make of it and are willing to learn. It helps to have good teachers no matter what you are attempting.



    But in SHTF or TEOTWAWKI...the rules are off..and I agree....OPSEC will become important...

    I am not planning on using a call sign...in SHTF......or TEOTWAWKI. You folks drive your own bus...your own way...and be responsible for it.

    But Ham radio expanded out my know how and confidence with radio....for this I am grateful.

    In SHTF or TEOWAWKI...it will be the knowledge and experience which is going to make the difference ..not the rules per se...
    But you do not want to become two legged wildlife..or a pestilence .......no matter what the condition....
    You want to stay away from becoming wildlife....and be discrete.... private...even professional if one knows how.


    With this storm.....Dorian ...I am beginning my Baofeng Walkie talkie charging cycle and also my spare car batteries out in my garage along with my deep cycle battery as well.

    Not sure where or when it will make landfall.....but not waiting to the last minute to make preps or go to the stores.

    Have rolls of copper wire I can toss over trees to fabricate a multi band antenna..preferably to set up as a sloper antenna. I've used this configuration before to talk across country ..and easy to put up. Have a tuner too...several even.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2019
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  32. duke in wales

    duke in wales Expert Member
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    Worth picking up a USB charging lead Chris for your Baofeng sets, lead plugs into the charger base and a Power Bank.

    These are handy as well, 2m extension lead
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Extended-R...042953?hash=item23c102d249:g:hUkAAOSwMKVdJxys Great in a tent or vehicle, I find most curly cords mean you more or less have to hold the unit, with the extension you can set the unit down and have more free movement.

    Have you put up a loop antenna in your loft/roof space yet? I also have a dipole laid in the guttering and down pipe...thats said I've still got full size dipoles and a Yagi on a tower so I'm not a 'hidden' ham.
     
  33. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Duke in wales...

    The antenna I use outside is a loop antenna....made from 12 gauge wire about 500 feet long and strung into the tops of my trees....wire came from the local hardware store. It works well with the MFJ tuner I have. I prefer a loop but also have long wire dipole antennas for back ups/emergency set up. Used it at the cabin some time back to talk to my friend a couple of states over from here. ..about 400 miles on 75 meters.
    Use ladder line to feed it.

    The wire loop is not that easy to spot unless one is looking and knows what they are seeing. Same thing with my UHF'/VHF J pole I made..and blacked out with black magic marker. It is up about 60 feet and does most of my local talking. Made from some plans off the web....simple once you know.

    Have a 13 element yagi but took it down. Also made a 2 meter wire quad four element beam vertical and horizontal..and it works...
    Havent put it up yet but it is on a fixed pole.

    For now my J pole works fine locally . I do like 2 meter sideband when I have time.

    Only band I've not used much is 6 meters.

    Watching the time ..gotta run now...

    Back later.....thanks.

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  34. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Expert Member
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    Yes, but the wife made me take it down! It did give me some better reception. I just rerun the antenna wire when I experiment with it. I need to replace a window in the upstairs area. I plan on running the antenna outside when rebuild the frame when I replace the glass. The window is right next to where I have my area set up to use it. I’ll have a bit more free time in the winter to experiment. I’ve probably only spent 6-7 hours using it so far. It’s a nice little rig!
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  35. duke in wales

    duke in wales Expert Member
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    I've got a LOT of ham gear going from vintage to new, Baofeng to Icom but I get a real buzz working QRP CW on a few watts, I've worked VK stations QRP before now :)
     
    Alaskajohn likes this.
  36. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    It is nice working QRP...and proof that your system is efficient..and well tuned..as a set..each piece working well towards and for the whole....that you have done a good job in putting it together. QRP is the ultimate proof.

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  37. duke in wales

    duke in wales Expert Member
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    We are limited to 400w in the UK so even if you have a 2Kw linier you have to 'tone it down' :oops: but as said I love QRP and its become affordable for a lot of hams. I run mostly an 817nd but the Xiegu rigs are about 40% cheaper and do a bloody good job. I'll be using a G90 as the core of a new solar set up.
     
  38. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    yeah...I have an 800 Watt PEP amp..but seldom need to run it over 200 PEP watts.

    Areas of this country with heavy population areas have more power restrictions than the wide open spaces...

    Nonetheless...I seldom run full output here. Not much need to with so much band space/frequencies now available to me.

    Thanks,
    Watccherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite
     
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