Spruce Tip Syrup

Discussion in 'General Q&A' started by Caribou, Nov 27, 2019.

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  1. Caribou

    Caribou Master Survivalist
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    I was given a bottle of Spruce Tip Syrup, about 3 OZ. Do I have something for my pancakes or something for my medicine cabinet?
     
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  2. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Don't know but be sure to update us when you find out.
     
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  3. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    it is most likely one of many ingredients for making spruce beer, a colonial favorite.
     
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  4. Caribou

    Caribou Master Survivalist
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  5. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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  6. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    THE MEDICINE CABINET!!!
    Spruce tips are high in vitamin C and contain an oil that is antimicrobial, antibacterial and immune-stimulating and can be used as a salve for skin rashes, cold sores, skin rashes, dry skin, bug bites and as a rub for chest congestion, joint aches, headaches, and arthritis.
     
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  7. Caribou

    Caribou Master Survivalist
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    Thanks Justin.
     
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  8. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
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    Does anyone know if you can also make this syrup using pine, as opposed to Spruce? I would love to give this a go, but I don't think Spruce is a common tree here in Aus, unless you buy one from the nursery. We have a lot of pine trees in the forests however.
     
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  9. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    not to say it's not doable but I cannot recall pine pitch being used for food. It is usually used for pitch glue. I have often wondered about pine nuts for food. Pine nuts have been used for food but I have not tried to harvest them
     
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  10. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
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    Thanks for the info. I haven't been able to find anything on the net thus far. I was hoping, being a similar species, that it would have similar properties and be able to make the syrup.
     
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  11. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Arthritis almost always has an autoimmune component, therefore anything that stimulates the immune system can -- and usually does -- make arthritis symptoms and damage worse.

    I must take drugs to suppress my immune system, else I could go totally crippled and/or have severe internal organ damage. If the immune system is working OK, then leave it alone. One does need vitamin C to prevent scurvy. Vit C is water soluble; take a bunch of Vit. C and you will simply urinate it out.

    I could be convinced that some coniferous pitch could be used on some skin malady, however I'm not drinking it.

    Rose hips are great for delivering vit. C..
     
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  12. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    balsam fir pitch is awesome on burns. When I was a youngster I would chew spruce pitch and beeswax as a "chewing
    gum" it mellowed out after a spell.
     
  13. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
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    Wow. Interesting. I too suffer chronic arthritis. Your post has certainly given (excuse the pun) food for thought.
     
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  14. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Old Geezer,

    Most appreciative.

    Now I understand about my arthritic situation.

    My symptoms are just routine misery ...... The damage info; now I understand.

    Merci with a southern accent.
     
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  15. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    I know next to nothing about spruce but do know a good bit about pine tree sap . As a kid we kept a gallon jug of pine sap derived turpentine . I have seen some impressive cuts that were simply douced with turpentine , wraped with an old rag douced in turpentine and that was about the beginning and end of the first aid and any other aid for that matter . The best turpentine comes from the long leaf pine species . It is noted for its rich and potent pine sap . This species only grows in the south east United States and has become rare to find even there . This particular tree is also the only pine tree the old timers considered worthy of its aged and dead remains to be considered what we called lighter . Lighter had that special resign to burn hot and easily . I haven't tried the store bought variety of lighter " stores might give it a different name " but I doubt what they try to pass as lighter would cut it by the S.E. old timers . I have a chunk of real lighter laying by my wood cook stove that I haven't brought myself to cut up with my axe and using as it is simply to precious to burn frivolously . ----As for as eating pine cone seeds , yes they are eatable but the seeds are so small you would starve to death trying to harvest enough seeds to survive on .
     
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  16. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
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    Thanks for such an interesting post. I had never heard of turpentine derived from pine sap. Do you have a pic you can post of the pine needles/cones? Wondering if it's the same type we have here - we have some pines that are Australian that have small nutlets in the cones, or if it's a species that was originally from America.
     
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  17. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    I don't have a picture of the long leaf pine or the computer knowledge on how to post it . I can give a description . The needles are about 10 to 12 inches long " thus comes the name long leaf pine " . The cones it produces is larger than any other pine tree " that I am aware of ". The trunk tends to grow taller , straighter and less lower limbs than other pine species " which makes it a more valuable tree than other pines . It is a slower growing species of pine . I don't know if it is still done but back in the day the bark would be cut and a catch container placed under the cut to collect sap . The sap would normally be placed in 55 gal drums and taken to the processing plant and sold .
     
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  18. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
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    Thanks for the additional info. I'll google and see if I can find it to compare.
     
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  19. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    some pine nuts may be small but pinon pine is decent size at least the Apache and such thought so. I noticed on happy people, a year in the taiga. The folks on the show used a big wooden hammer to thump a pine tree shake down the cones. Not sure what pine they are but they harvested the cones for the seeds.

    I noticed at the museum of the Appalachia there is a flat rock with a peace sign pecked into it. A peace sign with a couple extra angles. Anyhoo they would take a metal bucket of fat pine chunks and turn the bucket upside down over the peace sign. Seal everything up with clay other than a little trough coming out of it. A fire was built on top and thee pine tar would run down the little trough into a container.
     
  20. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
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    Wow, so interesting. Thanks. I wouldn't mind trying that, just to see what happens. Not that I'll get the opportunity for a while, given the constant fire bans here until March/April. Still, I'll try and remember to give it a go when I can.

    Thanks again. :)
     
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