Sugardine

Discussion in 'Natural Medicine and Home Remedies' started by randyt, Jul 4, 2019.

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  1. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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  2. Blitz

    Blitz Expert Member
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    What an interesting article. I will definitely be looking into seeing if I can acquire some for the medicine cabinet.

    Thanks for posting :)
     
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  3. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    I wonder how the sugar contributes?! Could be that it forms a reverse-osmotic gradient. It could pull-out fluids that exacerbate the infection. Maybe that's it. Ask a vet if they would use this on humans. We and critters do vary. And the location of an infection, wonder if that's a factor? I only know three people who have hooves. A horse can have wounds that tear the gut wall allowing fecal bacteria into the peritoneum, yet they will often survive this -- a human with the same injury will develop peritonitis, rot, and die.

    Maybe a pharmacist will know.
     
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  4. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    https://www.askaprepper.com/how-to-make-antiseptic-sugardine-to-treat-wounds-and-inflammation/

    https://www.tngun.com/how-to-make-sugardine-antiseptic/

    This last article confirms what thought could be the mechanism of benefit -- sugardine draws out the excess moisture. On our planet, get even a rock wet and something will start growing on that dang rock. Wet dead tissue is food for bacteria, thus during debridement, dead tissue is cut away. Putting maggots on a wound helps heal it because maggots only eat decay.
     
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  5. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    honey can also be used on wounds but I think sugardine is probably better. Have no proof though
     
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  6. Blitz

    Blitz Expert Member
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    Yep, makes sense:

    "Knutson et al. said in a 1987 Southern Medical Journal article: “Wounds treated with sugardine differ from wounds treated with antibiotics. Sugar is not an antibiotic by definition, nor when used in connection with povidone-iodine. Unlike those treated with antibiotics, sugardine-treated wounds clean up rapidly; sugardine reduces edema, nourishes the surface cells and has no fetid odor.

    [​IMG]
    A Glu-Strider bar shoe configuration was applied to take all of the weight off the lateral hoof wall and to properly transfer this weight onto the frog.

    “The use of sugardine treatment seems to accelerate granulation tissue and epithelial tissue production, thereby covering the wound, burn or ulcer with skin"
     
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  7. Blitz

    Blitz Expert Member
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    Honey was my immediate thought actually. I remember it's been toted for antibacterial properties, especially Manuka honey, which is an Australian honey. It's incredibly (and I mean incredibly) expensive though. Not sure if the US has something similar.

    "Most of the benefits of Manuka come from the methylglyoxal in the honey. This organic compound helps to fight against some types of particularly harmful and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Studies have found that it may help to inhibit growth of both E. coli and staphylococcus aureus bacteria. This means that Manuka honey can be a great way to lower levels of harmful bacteria in a person's body."

    https://ca.iherb.com/blog/health-be...WXlv1UdJG6kL8mLa9NhoCrWcQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
     
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  8. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    nothing in the US that compares to Manuka as far as I know. I've been wanting to get some Manuka.
     
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