Surviving a high fall

Discussion in 'Survival Stories' started by remnant, Jun 17, 2016.

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  1. remnant

    remnant Expert Member
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    Most people, I included have a fear of heights especially when inside tall buildings or near a tall cliff. Merely imagining the possibility of a fall is enough to send shivers down the spines of many people. There was a recent case of a person who clung onto the stands of a helicopter taking off and found it too late to disengage. He finally released his hold when the helicopter decided to land elsewhere and fell badly and injured his face. Are there techniques to survive a fall?
     
  2. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I don't think a high fall is survivable, an old friend who was in the ambulance service said in these circumstances the body is reduced to jelly and even removing the corpse is problematic.
     
  3. John Snort

    John Snort Well-Known Member
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    I've heard some tips such as relaxing your body, bending your knees, etc, etc but those who tell you these work have never actually fallen off a building, cliff or tree.

    I fell into a deep pit that was half filled with water about 15 years ago. All I remember is feeling the ground give way beneath me and next thing . . . I was in the water. Those who heard me fall in [there was this loud splash] probably thought I was dead and were surprised to see me floating in the water.

    Long story short, the best you can do is stay away from the edge of buildings, precipices, etc.
     
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  4. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    one of the Kilchers on Alaska the last frontier fell 30+ feet off a cliff and broke 26 bones in his body including many ribs, he had pins in his hip and shoulder ,at one point the doctors weren't even sure if he would live, recovery took many months most of which he was out of action, if your survival depends on you being active every day whether you survive the initial fall could be the least of your problems.
     
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  5. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    I spent if I recall right two weeks practicing falling in the military . There definitely is a correct way to fall . The training was conducted centered around the fact we were being trained to parachute from airplanes . The training was supposed to be for one week but after the week they deemed I wasn't good enough at falling so I went thru another week . By the end of the second week I was very good at it . We practiced four different ways to fall . that depended on which way the wind was blowing frontwards , to the left , backwards and to the right . In all four falling methods the points of contact remained the same first ground contact ball of the feet ,twisting the body if necessary second contact sides of the legs then side of buttock , going into a roll next contact back of shoulder . Keep legs slightly bent at knees and toes pointed somewhat downward before ground contact .Do not try to break your fall with arms or hands .
     
  6. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I think there is a vast difference in learning to fall with a parachute and accidentally falling because you have blundered off a cliff or walked to near a high rise ledge, one is premeditated the other is unexpected.
    I don't think many of us will be having access to a parachute post SHTF!!
     
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  7. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    You are correct lonewolf but that knowledge has served me well even in a minor accidental fall . Of course if you found yourself falling upside down that knowledge wouldn't be of much help . I had a good friend that wanted to fly fish a stream i regularly fish containing a lot of slippery rocks . In less than one hour he had a broken arm from not falling correctly .
     
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  8. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    and post SHTF without a medical person in your group he would have had a permanent broken arm, I have had broken arms in the past where the break was so bad an operation was the only remedy, unfortunately I cant see many hospitals surviving long term after SHTF.
     
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  9. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    I have a good friend who is ex parachute regiment, he fell from a ladder while doing some building maintenance. Although he was badly injured he credited his parachute training for preventing him from being more badly hurt or even crippled.
     
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  10. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    I hate heights. I don't even like stepping off of the curb. I will take John Snort's advice, and stay away from the edge of a precipice or tall building.
     
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  11. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    I'm not keen on heights but I force myself to get on with it, after an hour or so I begin to desensitise and just concentrate on the job. I've had a couple of falls but escaped with bruises and concussion. I do a lot of tree work but I'm trying to cut down (haha) since I'm now past 50.
     
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  12. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I've never liked heights, I don't like climbing ladders, long ones anyway, and I stay away from cliff edges, around the south coast being near a cliff edge could be suicide as they are all sand stone and liable to collapse.
     
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  13. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    I do avoid cliff edges, as I don't trust the soil. Ladders no problem, just go slow and make sure they are solid in their footing.
     
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  14. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    Method and technique are everything when handling ladders or personal protective equipment at heights. Well maintained equipment used properly in a sensible methodical way will dramatically reduce the risk of injury.
     
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