The Walk Of A Woodsman

Discussion in 'Hunting / Fishing / Trapping' started by poltiregist, Mar 19, 2021.

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  1. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Have you guys noticed the way a woodsman walks ? They take their example from wild animals such as deer . This becomes such a practiced habit that whether they are on a hunt or not their walk is a noticeable trait . Unlike city dwellers bobbing up and down and flopping their arms around , a woodsman's body remains still with nearly the only motion being their legs . Even the legs are moved in a fluid motion , not the jerky motion of a non-woodsman . Even the military doesn't teach this stealthy walk .
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2021
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  2. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    A military style walk is also noticeable . It is similar to a woodsman's walk but contains swinging arms . Such acute observations can clue in as to what a survivalist has meet .
     
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  3. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    different horses for different courses.
    people in town or city are walking on a concrete pavement or sidewalk, of course their gait is different, probably trying to avoid other people as well.
    I would not want to stand out from a crowd by the way I walk, grey man as much as possible.
     
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  4. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Master Survivalist
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    The military absolutely taught how to walk stealthy when I was in. The arm movements observed while marching is for marching and it s not how you walk while on patrol or sleuthing through the jungle, tundra or whatever.
     
  5. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    If I would have been moving my arms around while on patrol, an NCO would have knocked me in the head for a life lesson. The way we walked on patrol was very different than how we marched. I hated marching. LOL! A bunch of BS pomp for what was usually some stupid dog and pony show. There was a reason I volunteered for SO.

    Dale
     
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  6. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Wow, you just brought back some ancient memories for me. You opened-up a closet door in my mind and a whole bunch of things fell out.

    My mom's dad taught me to hunt. He in his youth was a subsistence hunter, Cherokee blood, major poverty, lived up in the mountains, tiny towns were a day's journey by wagon. Hunting was mega-critical to his people.

    So when went hunting, Pap turned into something else; not somebody else, something else. When he walked -- I can see him in my mind right now -- he walked stoop-shouldered as if perpetually walking under low branched trees. Out in the open, he walked the same way. We would always hunt after a rain so that the leaves were wet and not crackle.

    At this time, he was over 60 and fat -- yet he made ZERO noise while walking. His footfalls were like in slow motion -- the exact opposite of stomping. He walked as if on glass that was not to be broken. Here is this wide fat man (not tall, 5'8' at best; still over 200 lbs) cutting through the forest silently, breaking no twigs. Even when getting out of breath (we hunted in the mountain forests), he kept his breath silent -- like he opened his throat or whatever. When acknowledging my existence (a slight burden to him) he would whisper to me as if we were in some sacred library.

    He could make squirrel sounds that sounded just like squirrels. That's one of the things he taught me, making the sounds of the game you pursue. Squirrels chattered back at him such that we could walk into them and shoot.

    People, I'm telling you that all this made an impression on a 13 year old boy, me. My pap wasn't the most normal person you'd ever not want to get to know (fighter, easily angered; yet softy around kids, me anyway), but when hunting, he was some force of nature. He stalked like some mountain lion. Which reminds me, his gaze became piercing. I stopped existing to him when we were in the woods; I became some tag-along encumbrance to him. That rubbed off on me. People, including the wifer, say that I often look mean. When I'm in learning mode, emotion leaves me. When among these human thingies, I'm always learning. Humans are strange to me.

    Poltiregist, I don't know whether to thank you or not. You kind'a put me in the Twilight Zone, here. I'm stuck in a time-warp. I just stopped off at my computer for a moment, been straightening up the house with me wifer. Now this. Ten thousand pounds of memories are pounding down on me in this mental state -- you've altered my consciousness. I can see him. He is here in the room almost. I don't feel those eyes though. He's not hunting.
     
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  7. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    How you walk is at least partially determined by what sort of terrain you are walking in. When I am in the woods, I tend to place one foot more directly in front of the other than I do in normal walking. I spent hundreds or thousands of hours in the Big Thicket National Forest and in the swamps. Walking a wide step is nearly impossible because of the underbrush and vines. On hills, especially in rocky place, a much wider stance is important. We didn’t have many of those where I was raised. Actually, NONE…

    When I was a kid I only had two types of foot wear other than bare. It was either leather shoes dress shoes or cowboy boots. Back then they didn’t make tennis shoes for my kind of feet. My feet were tough as shoe leather and I only wore boots or shoes when I was going someplace.

    I guess people have wider feet that they used to. I can find shoes that fit my 10 ½ EEE feet now where when I was a kid I had to break shoes in and MAKE them into wide shoes. That was painful as hell and I did not want to wear them out and have to break in a new pair so only wore them when I had to.
     
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  8. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Just bought a pair of boots at Tractor Supply. Branded by CAT, as in Caterpillar work boots. I wasn't going for steel-toe boots, but these are ... and I'm glad. Working Forest Service as a kid, had a heavy log set down on my foot and because of their requirement for steel-toe boots, I didn't even feel the log, much lest get a smashed foot. Sometimes you gotta chop back towards your feet and legs thus steel-toe boots and shin guards.

    I, by-god, take care of my boots. Wax wax wax wax ... I've only had maybe four or five pair of high-top boots in my life. When my boots are worn out, they are destroyed. I'm keeping my last pair, but they are sliced in places and now the bottoms cracked = get a new pair of boots. Oh, and like Tex, I have to order wide sized or they just won't fit (I don't have to get the size EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE, however). Too you gotta have room for quality socks which are thicker than day-to-day cotton socks.

    We'd take a hemlock log and make vertical cuts along the top. Let's say you got an 18" diameter log. Cut down, say 5" on each vertical. Now use your Pulaski axe's adze (vertical) blade to flatten-off the top of the log. Thing is, standing on the log, you are using an axe to chop right straight back towards your feet and shins; therefore, steel-toe boots and shin guards.

    This log can be used as a foot bridge across a stream. One can use a come-along to tighten a steel cable parallel to and above the log to make a handrail. You've already got a winch or a come-along there with you to get the length of the log across a stream. We made foot bridges like that. We didn't want people wading the streams, because that always kicks-up silt which is bad when you are trying to get fish restarted in those mountain streams.

    upload_2021-3-19_23-46-18.png
     
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    1. Ystranc
      It's a slightly different technique to do the same job but green woodworkers in the uk would use a side axe
       
      Ystranc, Apr 13, 2021 at 3:51 AM
  9. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    For running the woods trails the best thing that I have ever worn was a pair of soft high-top moccasins. They were sort of like a middle high pair of boots but with a soft leather sole. I like to be able to feel the things that I and stepping on when I am trying to move silently in the woods. Barefoot is best but sucks when you get in the briars or burrs. The soft leather protects you from that without taking away your ability to feel what your feet are on. The hard sole boots and shoes are for walking on pavement or rocks. In the woods the ground is usually sort of soft so all you need is a little protection from getting poked. There was a reason why someone that was new to the frontier was called a tenderfoot.
     
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  10. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Up in the Appalachian mountains, you'll be walking on wet soggy muck only to run into smooth rock and then jagged rock. Sharp edged limbs are on the floor of the forest -- these are the limbs that have yet to go to rot. Currently at altitude, we have trees with the tops and boughs broken-out due to mega-nasty ice storms. This looks weird; the trees with snaggle-toothed tops. The forest floor is now covered with those tree-tops. If we get a dry fall season, forest fires will be greatly enabled.

    For such rugged and profoundly uneven forest walking, one must have boots with a robust sole and an ankle area that can be strapped tight for the prevention of sprained ankles (we call'em creeled ankles). When young, I liked to hike up in the mountains with the girls. I had no money, but the rich girls were cute and their daddies had money. They could buy the best smoke. We'd get high up in the mountains, if'y'know'whut'I'mean. Even though I loved their pretty legs and feet, I had to tell them that they needed boots and properly fitting long-leg blue jeans. Since they'd gotten into hiking, most >50%, had good boots ... not all. Bad shoes = slow hike. It would take forever to get back into the areas of remote waterfalls. These areas are dangerous. Them going half-naked = cut-up legs. Man, have I ever seen girls with bleeding legs = not pretty. I've seen the tall grasses slice the girls' legs. Once out with three girls and all three got their legs sliced. Had to cross the 3 ft to 4 ft grasses to get to woods where we were going to start a campfire. Tall grass has thick sharp blades; looks pretty blowing in a breeze, but that stuff is bad for human flesh.

    Different environments call for different boots.

    When in areas where you could go under water, heavy boots are NOT what you want.

    Been in suck-your-boots-off mud. That's when you need lace-up. However, if it is going to be CONSTANT muck, then "barn boots" are just the ticket for barnyard sh#tty mud. Buy ones that really fit your feet, else they'll get sucked right off your feet. Been there had that. I use barnyard boots for my garden and for when I'm traveling through wet melting snow with the muddy ground beneath.

    Powder snow and icy snow, I don't know much about; but I'd like to have snow shoes for that. I can't ski; never tried. Talked to a lady from Minnesota week before last and she said that everyone was getting around her town in snowmobiles.

    For ice, I have strap-on cleats for my boots.
    .
     
  11. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Where I was raised there were no natural rocks. It was swampy and the ground was soft as hell. When I say no rocks I mean NONE that are natural or native. The Local Native Americans there used the scales off of gar fish for arrow heads. A side scale off of a big gar are the size of a silver dollar and nearly as thick.
     
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  12. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    a persons walk or gait will be different depending on the terrain that they are walking on, I walk differently in town on a pavement than I do on a trail in the woods, different again when walking on moorland and boggy ground, different again on coastal rocks and sand.
     
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  13. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    THAT is exactly where someone that is familiar and comfortable in the woods and a city person are so different. My gait changes to adapt to all of the different terrains. I used to have a friend that occasionally went fishing in one of my back woods ponds with me and he never went that he didn't fall down a couple of times.

    Part of the way was on a pothole infested dirt road and then a hike through the woods and finally in thick brush until you were on the shore of the little lake. How I walked just changed without me thinking about it while he walked as if he was walking on a sidewalk all the time. For one thing he never seemed to look down until he tripped. I scanned the trail ahead constantly without thinking about it much.

    I used to be very surefooted and seldom tripped even when I was in the dark. It was as if my feet had eyes. I think that that was the result of always preferring the night over the daytime. My eyes were never very good, and I was 8 of so before they figured out that I was nearly blind. When your eyes are as bad as mine you probably see about as much detail at night as you do in the day.

    By the time I got glasses I had adapted to seeing with my feet and not over committing to a step until I kind of felt it out a bit. I used to sneak out of the house at night and go into the woods. My parents were of the early to bed, early to rise sort and never caught me. This was back before there were really good small flashlights, so I generally didn't bother with one. I think that the little 2 AA Maglites now are better than the 2 D cell flashlights back then and even the C cell lights were not all that great.

    It was always sort of funny. When you are moving around at night without a flashlight the critters seem to just accept your presence in a way that they don't in the day. I've had armadillos walk right up to me as if they didn't care about my being there at ALL. Rabbits were not quite that brave but also didn't run from me. Instead, they would just walk off a little bit and just watch me. A lot of critters seemed to be more curious about me than afraid.
     
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  14. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Agility for outdoors running and long distance hiking begins in childhood. We kids would run at full gallop through the fields and through the woods. Outdoors = perpetual uneven surfaces. Gets wired in the brain. People who were not raised in the outdoors don't have that wiring.

    Watching an urbanite walk on what one would consider a fancy walking trail is strange. It's as if they've lost their balance when you just know that they couldn't have. They stare at their feet as if walking a tight wire. It is their brain learning how to adapt to the foreign surface, i.e. earth.

    There's also a psychologic component to the outdoors. Once had an urbanite tell me she was afraid driving in our region due to lack of human habitation. She noted that there were long stretches of road that were only surrounded by forest. Me, I'm comforted by that. It's like God is holding me in His arms. To the urbanite, they are abandoned in chaos.

    Urbanites require noise. When things are very quiet, they feel like they must fill up the void with sound. They point and stare at people simply sitting on their porch "not doing anything". "Those people sure are ignorant," said the city-slicker. The hillbilly stops and thinks. As a boy, the word I heard was "ponder". "Boy, I'll ponder on that." And they do. They are in their thoughts.

    Rural folk / hillbillies do not seek immediate gratification and they do not talk until there is something worth saying. Rural folk don't chatter. Hillbillies will stand up and just go for a walk -- not saying a word. "Where did that old man just go?" said the city-slicker. Such are the behaviors of hillbillies, not rednecks. Hillbillies got no patience for rednecks.

    You can be in the middle of absolute nowhere and have some ancient hillbilly come out of the dark silence of nodamnedwhere and ask if you need some tobacco. He'll have a pouch and offer you a chaw. He'll stand there and not speak to you. He doesn't have to. He already knows all about you. If he reckoned you were unfriendly, you'd go on never seeing him. If he reckoned you were dangerous, you'd never hear the report of his rifle going off.

    In the rugged silence, you are surrounded.
    .
     
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  15. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    I have to agree about urban people needing noise, my theory is they are afraid of silence, its like the dark, it scares them s##tless, once the power goes off post SHTF and there is no traffic or airplane noise they will go nuts.
     
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  16. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    Disagree with that, disciplined marching helps with team spirit, promotes esprit de corps etc, has its place. Tell a member of the Legion Etrangere they practise BS and they'd likely punch your lights out ;)

     
  17. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    marching in formation is good for parades but not much good in woodlands and other natural places, try marching in formation on Dartmoor and they all march straight into a bog .
     
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  18. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Marching is a mostly useless remnant from the times in the past when armies walked/marched to get places and into battle. It is cute but totally useless in the field. With the advent of machine guns walking in close formation is just a good way to get a bunch of people killed.

    Now you don't march into battle, you ride and then scatter in a planned attack that minimizes the opportunity of your opponent to take a bunch of you out without much in the way of threat to him. When he cuts loose the marchers all dive into the ditch or bushes and he slips away and does it again later until your leadership spreads you out with wings and flankers.

    It is a great look on a parade ground and maybe has use in basic training but other than that it is mostly useless. You can have coordinated movements without being in lock step.
     
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  19. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    in the English civil war, and even today with reinactment societies, watching a detachment of soldiers of either side marching down the road with their Pikes held high is really something to see and would strike fear into many an enemy.
     
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  20. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    Remember folks we don't march in the woods and we don't march into battle anymore LOL "Come on lads, show um bags 'o' swag' :) Good way of breaking in new boots too.
     
  21. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    no Americans use Humvies, what do we use? Land rovers and trucks, see them on the roads in the summer quite often, they do survival training on Dartmoor.
    did you see the UK govt is intending to decrease Army troops by 10, 000, seems their going more for technology than boots on the ground.
     
  22. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    I thought hummers had been dumped? Land Rovers are on their last legs these days, don't make them any more but the army has a lot of soft skin Pinzsguer 's (fantastic off road) and the new Ocelot armored vehicles are coming online. When I was overseas the army shipped in a good few Toyota's for picking up the groceries type of stuff.

    We don't have an army any more, its a police force for overseas deployment. Boris is keen on having a cyber army but that won't stop bullets and bombs. We'll end up with a bunch of specialists tapping keyboards with the hope the TA turn up when called to serve.
     
  23. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    80,000, soon to be 70,000, isnt an Army, the Police Force is bigger than that and even they are understaffed.
    if this continues we wont have any Army or Police, at all, protection will be up to the individual and thats BEFORE society collapses!!
     
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  24. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    This leaves G.B. ready for the picking by any aggressive country that wants it . The British will not be receiving any outside help if a Muslim believing country , Russia , China or even North Korea wants to scoop it up . Any outside savior ended for the British when the U.,S. fell . Doubtfully even any of the other Nato countries would lift a finger to help without the U.S. .
     
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  25. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    dont forget we still have nukes in the UK!
     
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  26. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    That at least , leaves some hope .
     
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  27. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    seems the UK government wants to invest more in technology than actual boots on the ground.
    I think anyone or any govt who has such a belief in technology is probably in for a big fall.
    technology isnt infallible and will fail when they most need it.
     
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  28. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    Plus around 30,000 TA which is not enough
     
  29. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    What military was it that you served in? I've drunk with some of the best from many countries. Conversations never changed much and we all enjoyed making fun of REMF's, POG's and Wannabee's.

    Dale
     
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  30. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    British army Dale and thats all you need to know.
     
  31. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    I don't need more. Your previous comments, along with that, tell me everything I need to know about you. As long as none of it is lies. Lies make it more difficult, but not impossible.

    Dale
     
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  32. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    You know nothing about me Dale, 'Grey Man' and all that, I will say I've led an interesting life and continue to do so and I've no interest in your history :)

    Keep safe and virus free.
     
  33. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    As regards maxine, an individual who is unwilling to learn from the histories of others is predator food.
     
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  34. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    "Those that fail to learn the lessons of history are destined to repeat them".
     
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  35. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    We don't learn from history, just make up new excuses and names for the same old shite.

    21st century and the great nations of the planet are still encaged in a willy wanging contest over who can kill more people than anyone else in the most efficient manner, boys and their toys state of affairs really.

    On the subject of warfare there was an interesting talk on BBC radio 4 recently taling about the future of aircraft and the general view is that manned fighter aircraft will not be around in 20 years or so. Bottom line is pilots are expensive to train and can get killed quite easily, much cheaper to use advanced drones/attack craft flown by some youngster a couple of thousand miles away sitting at a computer screen and keyboard. This is what they are aiming at and I suppose it makes sense.
     
  36. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Note to Dalewick

    Back in the day, it wasn't called profiling. At least I don't specifically remember that term. No one term comes to mind, actually. The word "intel" comes to mind, of course. Big influence in my teenage years was a retired VERY senior non-com who was Army Intel multiple tours Korea & Vietnam. Talk about a rock of a man who would take zero B.S.! Day-in, day-out, year after year, ZERO B.S.. His "assessments" of people were hard, but they were golden. Him and my dad's lot being on the wrong side of the law made me grow-up before my time. I was counting money out of the gambling machines before turning 15.

    After my father's death, an associate of my dad had me doing petty work for him (I was in school as my father had demanded of me and his associates). Often, I would ride in the car to his "locations" -- where he had his machines (some actually legal). During these rides, this man told me the stories of the people who ran things in our area. Before age 20, I should have gotten some degree in "How things actually work in 'society'".

    Rodney Dangerfield, genius at large

     
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  37. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    LOL! That sounds a LOT like a couple non-coms that I worked for. My world was NO BS and never lie about work. I worked Recon and was taught never make assumptions and always gather intel. Take photos, draw what you saw, write descriptions of what you saw, but never assume what you were seeing was what you thought you were seeing. Everything can be faked, even human targets.
    fakearmy1.jpg

    The world is seldom what it appears. Anybody need an inflatable T-80 tank? LOL!

    Dale
     
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    1. Old Geezer
      F###ing words to live by!
      I've been royally bitten by making dumb-@$$ assumptions.
      I'm a man with little patience. It hurts, but sometimes you just gotta sit and watch how things play-out. At this age, I always ask others for their advice -- something that I was rather poor at doing during my youth.
      This month, was going to tell a son what to do. I held my tongue. Turned out that he did what I was going to tell him to do. Told him that his ideas/action were simply excellent.
       
      Old Geezer, Mar 26, 2021
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  38. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    I need an inflatable T-80 tank.

    I'd take it out to the lake and float by boaters in my tank.

    (I'd only need a trolling motor.)
    (I'd replace its barrel with a spud gun; an olive drab spud gun.)
     
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  39. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    https://i2kmilitary.com/inflatable-tanks/

    https://i2kmilitary.com/inflatable-military-vehicles/

    https://i2kmilitary.com/inflatable-military-aircraft/

    https://inflatablescompany.com/shop...y-army-tank-inflatable-balloon-great-quality/
    $2,950.00 :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:

    https://www.alibaba.com/showroom/inflatable-dummy-tank.html

    Looking at these prices, maybe I don't need an inflatable tank!

    And too ... When I was in Jr. High, dear old Dad began teaching me how to gamble; dice, cards, ... . I distinctly remember the time he got in my face and said, "You will never bluff me. I will always pay to see your cards." That man could joke; however, by-god he sure as hell wasn't joking when he said that to me. "Never bluff" = better learn that lesson early, your very life could depend on it.
    .
     
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    2. Dalewick
      Governments don't mind though, it's our money. LOL!
       
      Dalewick, Mar 28, 2021
  40. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I was raised playing poker and a good bluff is part of a good game of poker. If you don't call you don't get to see my cards. So those bluffs paid off well. The thing is that being called and caught can be an even better result. Once someone catches you when you do pull a winning hand you are better able to sucker them into calling with a hand that they really should fold on. It is just a part of the game. I learned to play with people that played at the professional level.

    One uncle used to go to Vegas for big games and the other one made a small fortune teaching optomists how to play while he was stationed in Greenland in the military. I think that my Dad only gave me an allowance so he would have something to take from me in family poker games. I learned fast that optimism gets you busted. Except for a bluff I play my hand and usually have a pretty good idea what everyome else has if we are playing 7 card stud. Five card draw poker is a little less of a science but odds are odds and when you play jacks or better to open it is pretty easy. If someone opens and you can't beat a pair of jacks you fold unless you feel lucky and have four cards to a straight with open ends or four cards to a flush. Even those are usually losing hamds though.
     
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  41. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    WOW! I don't think I've ever had a post taken down with so little content.

    Lonewolf. Did I violate a rule? That took like a maximum of 15 minutes of thought.

    Sorry if I broke a rule. Not my intent.

    Dale
     
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  42. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    My dad was making a point not to bluff in life. It worked on me.

    Bluff in a game, it's a game. Bluff in life, you might get dead. That's what my dad wanted to burn into me.
    .
     
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  43. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    A bluff in life is 6 guys shooting as many rounds, grenades and rockets at 200 bad guys they ran into that they can in 60 seconds and then running for there lives.

    A good bluff,....you live.

    A bad bluff,..... No one you loved knows where you died.

    Dale
     
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  44. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    When I was younger I can remember a couple of times when my ability to carry out a good bluff with a very believable face and attitude may have prevented a big problem. I convinced 15 rednecks one time that I considered today was a good day to die and that I would love to gut a couple of them before they could beat me to death for dating their lovely country lasses. I grinned and asked who wanted to dance as I opened a big buck knife and shaved a little hair from my arm. When none stepped forward, I shrugged and said maybe next time and left. It wasn't that they couldn't have taken me. It was that my seeming total lack of fear and gleeful attitude was CRAZY and unnerved them long enough for me to make my butt GONE!!!
     
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  45. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    I was living in an apartment just 1 mile from the city centre , just chilling out listening to some heavy metal music and I heard a scream from outside, it was my neighbour, an old retired nurse who was being shouted at and verbally assaulted by the local thug, I grabbed my gear, leather jacket, denim cut off, already wearing my Doc Marten boots and thundered down the stairs and out the door.
    I went over to where this lady and her companion, an equally older gent, were standing and stood beside them and folded my arms, didnt say a word just stood there, the thug remained for maybe 5 minutes or so mouthing obsenities at the old lady and at me, then he turned on his heel and departed, sure it was a bluff but it worked. btw no one else went to her assistance although there were others in the apartment block.
    I also did the same bluff in a nightclub when a friend was in trouble. again it worked.
    being tall and on the large size and hairy has its advantages.
     
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    1. Ystranc
      Respect for being the kind of person that will stand up for others
       
      Ystranc, Apr 12, 2021 at 3:47 AM
  46. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    Now, if I can return to the original post regarding the walk of a woodsman, it is down to how you transfer your weight as you walk, awareness of your surroundings and the surface underfoot, how you place your foot etc. It takes time to learn.
    Townies may think that a tree root looks like a convenient step but in reality it is slick as hell. Even a small piece of wet wood buried in leaf litter can be a slip hazard when wet or crack loudly underfoot when dry. Watchfulness is an all important skill in woodland as you need to be aware of hanging dead wood (widowmakers) Low branches can have your eye out if you're unwary and don't plan/watch your route through them particularly carefully. Strangely small, sharp twigs at face hight seem to be invisible to some people. I spend a lot of time in woodland used for rough shooting so I always wear a high vis bump cap (like a baseball cap with a hard shell in the lining)
     
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