Traps

Discussion in 'Trapping' started by Tom Williams, Oct 21, 2017.

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  1. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    The type of trap you choose may be the differnce between eating and stravation ive ran a tapline for many years muskrat mink beaver coon foxes and now coyotes are in my area the traps i use are very old leg hold body grippers styles snares are now legal here but i have success with my old ones so i dont set snares human smell must be masked well to trap small game birds rabbit and squrrils are easy to hunt better to do this than trap a air rifle would work well for this the snareing of large game deer and others would be better safer and easier to hunt a good bow would work for this. After shtf noise of a firearm will draw others to you and should be mostly used only to defend yourself from harm tapping will provide food and hides to use yes ut is a time consuming work and a skill that is hard to master have many choices to feed yourself develope these skills now so to improve your chances to live
     
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  2. Hick Industries

    Hick Industries Member
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    I started trapping fur 50 yrs ago. I used to own about 30 old, rusted traps, of uncertain age. I kept about a dozen of the better traps after I stopped.
    About 6 yrs ago I had a financial windfall and I bought ten dozen new traps, including some larger leg hold and body grip traps.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2019 at 8:52 AM
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  3. coffee

    coffee Well-Known Member
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    Where should I look to research and purchase traps? Where did you purchase yours?
     
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  4. poltiregist

    poltiregist Expert Member
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    The very-very earliest American explorers would survive for years in the wilderness with nothing but their rifle , traps and small possible bag . The items they deemed necessary should be part of any preppers stash . I keep all of those items in my preparation for the apocalypse . Just purchasing these items isn't enough , practice using these essentials . I expect most on here are well versed in using all legs of this stool but some may not . Keith has a good video of his possible bag .
     
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  5. coffee

    coffee Well-Known Member
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    But I would like to know of a good place to look at purchasing traps and information on the different kinds.
     
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  6. elkhound

    elkhound Well-Known Member
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  7. elkhound

    elkhound Well-Known Member
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  8. coffee

    coffee Well-Known Member
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  9. Hick Industries

    Hick Industries Member
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    Foothold trap sizes range in size from #0 (3.5") to size #5 (7.5") or by the outer jaw width. Most new traps sold today are coil spring designs which are favored due to their light wt and compact size. Several of the traditional long springs designs are still available and are used primarily for water sets, where their greater wt is an advantage in drowning the target animal. The size #0 (3.5") and size #1 (4") foothold are very small traps and they typically have weak, slow springs. They are only suitable for very light wt animals such as weasels and squirrels or for underwater sets for muskrats. The correct size trap to start with is the #1.5 coil spring (5") with a plain jaw. A good number to start with is 3 dozen. A good size body grip trap to start with is the #110 Conibear (4.5" x 4.5"). When you start considering trapping badger, coon, and fox you will want to add a dozen #2 coil spring (5.5") and a few #220 Conibears (7" x 7"). If you decide to try trapping Bobcats and Coyotes you will want some #3 Coils (5.8"). If you live in an area with beaver dams you could consider larger traps and conibears for them. The proper size for a larger beaver is the #4 coil (6.5"), the #5 coil (7.5"), and the #330 Conibear (10" x 10"). These are very expensive traps, so I would only buy a few to start. Careful, they can kill a large dog outright, and they are strong enough to hurt you. Back then, the local hardware store sold steel traps and they were all made by Onieda-Victor. I purchased the rest of my trapping supplies through Fur-Fish-Game magazine. This magazine is still published and it is still an excellent resource http://www.furfishgame.com/. Another great source for trapping info is the Fur Takers of America web site http://www.furtakersofamerica.com/bmp.html. Onieda Victor still produces excellent traps here in America. Plus, there are now a number of newer companies selling traps such as Duke, Bridger, Sleepy Creek, and the excellent Minnesota Brand. You can mail order them from nationwide sporting goods companies like Cabela's as well as trapping supply companies: http://www.minntrapprod.com/ http://www.rpoutdoors.com/ http://www.pcsoutdoors.com/trapping.aspx http://www.fntpost.com/
     
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  10. randyt

    randyt Well-Known Member
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    you can also reach out for any local trapper conventions. Many times dealers will have deals on traps and supplies. Also there are usually free classes available on trapping and skinning.
     
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