"visual Aids To Prepare For Disasters"

Discussion in 'News, Current Events, and Politics' started by Pragmatist, Dec 3, 2019 at 4:55 AM.

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  1. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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  2. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    It required a study? Funny, we have had many, many multimillion dollar disaster movies and it does not seem to move folks to become preppers. The slight increase in demanding government (other peoples money) get on the stick and improve seismic for the schools but it changed nothing about them spending their own money to get prepared. Funny how that all works.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2019 at 4:40 PM
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  3. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    the main problem, I think, is that we have a different generation with a different agenda to say my parents or even my generation, nowadays its all about having the next tech thing that comes along or having the latest smartphone with all its bells and whistles, not about putting food back in the larder-which dosent exist in most houses these days- in case they might get cut off from their supply chain for even a few days-never mind anything longer. priorities have changed and being self reliant-if only for a short time- is no longer one of them.
    in the UK where we don't have the sort of natural events that happen regularly in some parts of the US, we don't get earthquakes or hurricanes and we don't have serious wild predators, that a sort of complacency tends to descend on the general public and then when it does happen-like a heavy winter snowfall-they get caught out and have to be rescued, nobody seems to be able to take responsibility for themselves anymore.
     
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  4. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Pictures will have very little effect on people. They will persistently see what they want to see and anything that is distasteful they will ignore.
     
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  5. Caribou

    Caribou Master Survivalist
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    People were responding to engineering estimates combined with artists renderings of their children's schools. They don't have the capability to extend that to their own residence. Their home is wood, better, and not brick. Their neighbour isn't reinforcing their home. My car is three years old and I NEED a new one.

    On the other side. Securing shelving to the studs, securing water heaters to studs, putting safety latches on cabinet doors, putting safety/anti-tip straps to tall cabinets, and other earthquake remediation is not easily visible to the casual observer. It is also not expensive, especially if you do it yourself.
     
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  6. Caribou

    Caribou Master Survivalist
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    When we moved in here, over 4 years ago now, I put up about 14 feet of wire shelving in the garage. The ceiling is tall so the top shelf is over 8' up. I bought a 100 count box of 3" screws and another of fender washers, which provided extra. A stud finder helped me secure the shelving as we live in earthquake central. The shelving came with wire rails which are important to keep stuff where you place it.

    The highest mountain on North America is visible here, on a clear day. You don't get to claim that without the dishes rattling from time to time. Perhaps a year after we moved in my prepping efforts were rewarded with a 7.1, 40 or 50 miles from here and a year ago a 7.0 perhaps 25 miles from here. The 7.0 was on a different azimuth so the waves came from a different direction. Over a hundred homes were destroyed along with some schools, businesses, and roads were impassable. For us, each quake damaged our driveway, the 7.0 was the worst and I had to call in a repair crew. This is when I found that when they built the house they didn't secure the shelves above the clothes rods in the closets. No big deal, put the shelves back up, reload them, and add a few screws. The one china cabinet had an earthquake anchor (small strap at the top tied to a stud) so it stayed in place. The doors unfortunately opened and we lost a bit of crystal. Amazon was kind enough to send us magnetic child locks , for a fee, and we keep that cabinet, and others, locked. The other china cabinet walked a few inches into the room but stayed upright.

    The pyrex panicked and tried to get out of the house but only got as far as the tile floor. The metal cookware was much calmer and stayed put. Between the pyrex and the crystal we were finding shards months later. A bag of hot cocoa mix popped when it hit the floor and a couple other light items fell but there was very little loss except as described. I attribute this to quality construction and my quake preparations. I'm better set today as I learned from each experience.
     
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  7. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good afternoon Caribou,

    Are you and Old Geezer currently at the lounge section of InnKeeper's lodge in BC, Canada preparing the literary submissions to the NY publishers ? ! "The pyrex walked".

    "earthquake central": Love it !

    Had good time reading above. Being a geography nut, must look up Mt McKinley and basic viewing distances to mountain.
     
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