What Are The Best Tents For Long Term Camping?

Discussion in 'Tent, camper, RV, or other man made shelters.' started by branchd77, Oct 8, 2017.

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  1. branchd77

    branchd77 Administrator Staff Member Gold Supporter
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    What are some suggestions for tents you can use for long-term camping? I'm wondering about tents that have ventilation and can withstand long winters, spending months at a time in these tents even in temperatures below freezing.
     
  2. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I would be looking at a YURT or a TIPI , something one could have a fire or a stove in.
    For a permanent lifestyle change I would be interested in an Ancient British Roundhouse.
     
  3. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    I hate living in a tent. And now that I'm so arthritic, just shoot me.
     
  4. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    The Yurt and Teepee as Lonewolf mentioned are great almost permanent homes. About the only other tent that would work for a while is the old canvas type military cabin tents. You could put wood stoves in them and vent through duct flaps and they worked...but were cold as hell. Watch a few of the old MASH TV shows about the winters in those tents. In the south you can go pretty well in a just regular tent because basically all you need is something that will keep you dry and the bugs out. Any tent is a pretty miserable place to be for several days during torrential rains.
     
  5. omegaman

    omegaman Expert Member
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    In sweden, we have military tents of heavy canvas that somewhat resembles tipis with woodstoves. But up north of the polar cirkle, in the winters, snowhuts are the way to go in the winters.
     
  6. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    it gets more wet than cold in my area.
     
  7. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Either a fire proofed cotton or linen wall tent with a cook stove, or a tipi.
    47d7d841f12536a9101cb0fbbf40ff75.jpeg
     
  8. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    A canvas wall tent or a teapee or yurt of good heavy waxed canvas. If nothing else get a heavy tarp off a tractor trailer would do. Now long term think what is goung o make this better a stove a floor a strong frame for support in all weather. What to use swing set pallets cable long spikes in the ground think people whatever you can find buy steal is yours to use after shtf
     
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  9. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    A wall tent with stove set right works well after set up a pallet floor gets you off ground next pallet walls keep working and soon have a cozy home that will keep you warm safe and secure why pallets they are uniform in size frames quick easy to insulate stuff stuff unside then cover with cardboard or sale signs politcal ad signs whatever you find use no wall tent get a tarp off a tractor trailer and start with basic shape and build to survive longterm you have to think use and work todo so
     
  10. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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  11. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    A big heavy canvass tarp has a lot of uses. Build a low walled log cabin and throw it over it and you are set. Dig a hole and throw the tarp over it and you are covered. If it is cold rake up a big pile of leaves and cover it with the tarp and crawl in and you will be dry and warm. If you can find a cave or shallow hollow in the wall you can cover it with the tarp and have a good shelter. Just a thought...
     
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  12. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    My dad hauled gambling machines and pool tables (4' x 8', with 1" slate) in his truck. The truck had heavy steel rails, to include a rail that was the height of the truck's cab. A lot of my childhood memories involved tying down these heavy puppies. He always used manila rope (thick!) because it does not stretch very much at all under bearing weight (will shrink a tad if it gets wet). And we were always using heavy canvas tarpaulins. I can smell those oiled ropes and waxed tarps to this day.

    https://www.mytarp.com/canvas-tarps...MItO2E-MGZ1wIVFgaGCh0DcAzYEAAYASAAEgIlGfD_BwE

    Some folk oil these ropes with linseed oil, boiling the oil before applying/soaking. On sailing ships, tar was used and the tar was cut with a bit of turpentine. Better oils may be available in this day and age. I'd have to research this and I'd encourage others to research this topic.

    I do NOT like the slickness of polyester rope, however I have several lengths of it that I keep in my car.

    When dropping trees, I use 3/4" manila to attempt to better guide their fall -- watch out, else too much rope tension can cause the tree to kick off the stump with killer force to anything behind. These things will snap your leg like a twig; crush you like a bug. Cutting the wedge in the trunk is an art, but where that tree's weight is distributed is known to God. Thus, prayer is necessary before firing up your chainsaw.
     
  13. Kara Robert

    Kara Robert New Member
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    I own a 10-Person truck bed tent, purchased for traveling and car camping. It's a good tent for long term camp and easy to setup.
     
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  14. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    The big problem with the yurts, teepees and heavy canvas wall tents is that they are HEAVY. There are not something that you can carry on your back. At the very least you will need a wagon or travois and either some form of draft animal of a pretty large group of people to take turns dragging it around.

    We all know that the cars and trucks are not going to last for very long. The other thing is that anywhere that you can drive to that has the sort of surroundings that will be good will also attract others that can just as easily drive there.

    I think that I would rather carry a smaller lighter tent and tarp and the tools that I could use to build a more substantial cabin. Basically give me an ax, an adz, a froe, a crosscut saw a few augers and a draw knife and I'll build a house.

    I tend to think more along the lines of tools and making things than buying things that I can't replace. Unfortunately going native just won't work. in America the Native Americans built their Teepees out of hides from the huge herds of large animals that were fairly easy to find. These animals just don't exist in the kind of numbers that would allow you to make your teepee out of animal hides and making canvas isn't a likely thing until you have a much higher level of civilization.

    What you will need is mostly dependent on where you will be. If you are looking at a cold long wet winter you will need a lot more than a tent.
     
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  15. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Agreed Tex. Personally, if I was part of a group, I would suggest everyone carry an oil cloth. Put together you can make one or more wigwams. I will stick with my oil cloth, very versatile.
    Keith.
    81813db8cc71f649589389d7c5149f6a.jpeg
     
  16. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    Oilcloth will outlast any of the tarps made from modern materials. It is tough and will protect you in ways that lighter material just can't do. I agree with you that a group could carry the parts to make a better shelter than a tent. The military used to carry shelter halves so two soldiers had what it took to make one small tent for two.

    We always camped under a big oilcloth tarpaulin with mosquito nets over our cots when I was a kid. It was all we needed in the spring fall and summer and most of the time in the winter here. Lots of times our winters are warmer than a lot of what other places have in late spring and early fall. I always love those camping trips because the temperature was just right for a nice fire without you having to sleep cold.
     
    Keith H. likes this.
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