What Should Be In Your First Aid Kit

Discussion in 'First Aid Kit' started by Aneye4theshot, Jan 20, 2016.

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  1. Aneye4theshot

    Aneye4theshot Expert Member
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    When it comes to what you should have in your first aid kit, there are some essentials that will help any emergency situation in which first aid is required. The obvious band aid, gauze, and bandages are important. A needle and surgical thread, along with antiseptic and antibiotic ointment are also a great idea to carry with you. In any good survival first aid kit, you will also have an emergency snake bite kit along with some of the most common over-the-counter medications available. Things such as Bayer Aspirin, Ibuprofen, and Tylenol are available in small sealed containers that fit perfectly in any first aid kit. Another great item to carry is antibiotic such as amoxicillin. Amoxicillin can be purchased online. You would have to purchase the amoxicillin used for animals, but it is supposed to be the same stuff that is used by people. Having antibiotics could be the difference of defeating an illness or subcoming to one.
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    In a well planned and thought out first aid kit, you will also have a small lighter, and it is always handy to keep a cigarette in your first aid kit as well. The cigarette and lighter are not for smoking if that's what you're thinking. The lighter comes in handy during an emergency in multiple ways. The cigarette may be utilized when chewed up and applied to insect bites such as wasp stings or ant bites to help remove poisons from allergic reactions. Your emergency first aid kit does not have to be a huge one, in fact, the necessities and extras do not take up much space at all. In the game of survival, conservation is key.
     
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  2. cyclistbabe

    cyclistbabe New Member
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    I've never heard of the cigarette tip. That's extremely helpful. Do you know if it still works after the cigarette is expired??
     
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  3. Valerie

    Valerie Active Member
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    @cyclistbabe I think it's the nicotine in the tobacco that acts as an anesthetic. Of course, a menthol cigarette wouldn't do the same thing.
    I can also imagine the cigarette could help cauterize an injury... but that's kind of a last resort.

    Overall, very goods tips in here OP! Now I'm assured that my hoard of medicinal supplies is up to spec. The only thing I don't have is the cigarettes, because I don't smoke and they're too expensive to let them sit in a first aid box for years. Too bad I can't grow tobacco on my windowsill.
     
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  4. tb65

    tb65 Active Member
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    I think this is a really well put together first aid kit your describing. It sounds like your creating your first aid kit based on the kind of dangers you might face. I think that taking the right precautions based on your environment is smart. For bee stings I here making a baking soda paste works well. Maybe putting baking soda in your kit would be helpful.
     
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  5. Goodman

    Goodman New Member
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    Bаndаids, gаuzе, соttоn swаbs, q-tips, surgiсаl tаpе, sсissоrs, bеtаdynе/iоdinе, hydrоgеn pеrоxidе, аntibасtеriаl lоtiоn, buttеrfly bаndаgеs, surgiсаl supеrgluе, purе аlсоhоl, mаtсhеs, nееdlе аnd surgiсаl thrеаd, аspirin, ibuprоfеn, tylеnоl.
    оbviоusly yоu nееd tо knоw hоw tо usе thеsе things prоpеrly.
    My pаrtnеr whо is а physiсiаn аlsо саrriеs stuff likе surgiсаl shеаrs аnd а hоst оf things thаt I hаvе nо idеа аbоut аnd thеrе is а trасhеоtоmy (spеlling) kit undеr thе sеаt in thе саr
     
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  6. filmjunkie08

    filmjunkie08 Active Member
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    I am the kind of person that i would rather have too much in my first aid kit. I am also a diabetic so i would have extra items to treat high and low blood sugars.
     
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  7. hades_leae

    hades_leae Active Member
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    There are so many things that could go in a first aid kit, but what really would most likely be used? I'm sure when SHTF happens, people really won't be carrying around giant first-aid kits. I wouldn't, and my bug out bag would pretty much be my first aid kit because it would have all sorts of things in it that I could use.

    Anyways, most people generally use things in the wilderness to fix themselves up that had nothing to do with anything in their first aid kits. It's always good to keep a few good things though.
     
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  8. QuakeringInTokyo

    QuakeringInTokyo New Member
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    Great kit advice once again Aneye4theshot, I'm new here and to this way of life so this is invaluable info. Going to start learning how to apply first aid to others and to myself.
     
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  9. James L Bryant

    James L Bryant New Member
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    Make sure you have honey in there it is good antibiotics for cuts. Just my thoughts
     
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  10. Lee CT NE

    Lee CT NE Expert Member
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    Basic First Aid Kit

    Following is just a "starting point" for your First Aid Kit.

    There are many common emergencies and problems that can be handled by the contents of even the most basic first aid kit. Even the simplest cut can become a serious problem if left untreated.

    Basic contents for a first aid kit should include the following items.
    • Sharp Knive
    • Scissors
    • Tape
    • Bandages - assorted sizes
    • Roll gauze
    • Triple antibiotic ointment and/or first aid cream
    • Band-Aids
    • Gauze pads
    • Disposable safety razor
    • Adhesive tape
    And, some additional items to consider are the following.
    • Butterfly closures
    • Calamine or Caladryl lotion
    • Eyewash solution
    • Chemically activated ice and heat packs
    • Safety pins
    • Triangle bandage
    • Tweezers
    • Forceps
    • Aspirin or Tylenol tablets
    If you fish, a hook removal kit should be on the top of your list. This handy little addition to your first aid kit can save the day. However, don't wait to read the instructions until you need to remove a hook. Routinely review the directions that come with it.

    Each person will also find other items that he or she might need. Some of these items might include the following.
    • Motion sickness, antidiarrheal, and/or antacid tablets
    • Prescription medications
    • Bee sting kit
    • Snake bite kit
    If you are unfamiliar with first aid techniques, then you should consider taking an American Red Cross Basic First Aid Course. Additionally, all anglers and hunters should know Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). To take these courses, contact the local chapter of either the American Red Cross or the American Heart Association. You might also consider arranging to have one or more classes held at meetings of your fishing club.

    You can purchase a commercially available first aid kit with the above items in it or you can assemble your own. Either way, carry one whenever you go.
     
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  11. Lee CT NE

    Lee CT NE Expert Member
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    Advanced First Aid Supplies

    As you get more training/experience, you’ll find you begin thinking of some more advanced supplies you need for your First Aid Kit. Following are some items you’ll need to add.

    Basic Surgical Kit
    - Scissors
    - Probe
    - Suture Set
    - Scalpel
    - Hemostat
    - Pen Light
    - Tweezers
    - Alcohol Pads
    - Antibiotic Ointment

    Open/Sucking Chest Wound
    The best choice is a (Bolin Chest Seal) BCS is a sterile occlusive chest wound dressing that treats open pneumothorax resulting from gunshots, stab wounds, or other penetrating chest trauma. This dressing features a failure-proof triple-valve design of the BCS allows air and blood to escape while preventing the re-entry of either, thereby eliminating any unwanted gas or liquid exchange at the trauma site.

    Stop Bleeding
    I take a blood thinner for a health problem, so this was a must for me. Hemostatic Power Blood Stop is the most common and favored by US Military.

    Battlefield Dressings
    Battlefield/Trauma Dressings come in a variety of shapes and sizes. One of the best sources is from Israel. They are what their military uses and usually reasonably prices.

    Lidocaine Paste
    For suturing you need a way to numb the area. Injectable Lidocaine is best, but an easier method is to use what Tattoo Parlors use - Numb Master paste is the most commonly available and contains 5% Lidocaine.

    Face Masks & Gloves
    N95 Surgical Masks are a must. I buy mine individually sealed by the carton.

    A good supply of Nitrile (Latex-free) disposable gloves are a must. Get them in a thickness of alt least 4 mils. Buy a variety of sizes. A box per size is a good start.

    A Word of Caution: Don’t attempt to use any of the above without proper training. AND always check expiration dates and keep replacing as needed.
     
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  12. Dejah

    Dejah New Member
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    Very important essentials needed to make a first aid kit would be starting off with the basics like, bandages, sterile pads, disposable gloves, cleaning wipes, alcohol, tape, gauze and plenty more. Of course the bandages would be for any type of cuts or grazes one might get if they fall or brush up against something. Keeping everything sterile and clean is the most important thing people have to remember so they won't spread any diseases. So always wash hands or use hand sanitizer, then apply gloves when working with any open wounds. Medication isn't necessarily needed in a first aid kit, but it doesn't hurt to have them just in case, that's also including Neosporin or any type of antibiotic ointment for cuts. Having plasters in variations of sizes is much needed depending on how large the wound is, plus tape to secure the sterile dressings. Also just in case take along with you safety pins, or tweezers for splinter removal, those can really come in handy.
     
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  13. Mr Boots

    Mr Boots Expert Member
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    A mirror not a glass one as it could shatter in ur kit I use a replacement plastic wing mirror for a car I picked up in local motor factors for €5 handy it u hav a face injury or any injury out of ur line of sight and can be used to signal
    I also keep a small torch so no matter what I know there is always one near in times of emergency
    I have found in the past that that a valuable item is a note pad and pen
    you can note any medical history off your patent and keep record of their vitals
    *body temperature
    *pulse rate
    *rate of breathing
    So when medical emergency services turn up they hav a history of what's going on
    Also if someone in your group hav to go and get help if the information is written no matter if they too exhausted to speak or injured or cant remember all of the information they can just hand it over
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2017
  14. Paddy

    Paddy New Member
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    Some great tips here, made a note of a few things I should be adding to my first aid box. I thought the first aid kit I got from a local pharmacy was good, its got band aids, scissors, forceps, tweezeers, and a few other things but there's a lot of things listed here that it doesn't cover. Better to be safe than sorry so I'll definitely be adding to it. Thanks for the info :)
     
  15. Robin Roberts Jungle

    Robin Roberts Jungle Member
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    Hmm..I think most of the instructions are good and I would think most of this stuff in my survival kit. However, I have reservations about the tobacco and antibiotics. Smokeless tobacco still puts you at risk for cancer. Of course, if you're not chewing tobacco every day, you'll be okay, but that's just something you should keep in mind. You can use iodine, hydrogen peroxide, antihistamines, and calamine lotion instead. As for the antibiotics, health professionals do not recommend that you buy OTC antibiotics for your pet. The least restricted ones are for fish, and the doses for pets are different than those for humans. If you buy them online from 1800PetMeds, they will call your vet, if you didn't know, and it will look suspicious. They want to prevent antibiotic resistance, so please be careful! My favorite painkiller would be Tylenol. In my experience, it gets the job done better than the others. Aspirin can be good too. Overall, I think my survival kit would be similar to yours. I would try to make sure I have a variety of bandages, too, since that always gets me in trouble when I hurt myself at home
     
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  16. Bobsley

    Bobsley New Member
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    He there!
    Swiss Safe 2-in-1 First Aid Kit is always in my car, I have never used other brands, but I think it's the best first aid kit for me.
    you should try it.
    But anyway thank you for the information.
     
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  17. poltiregist

    poltiregist Expert Member
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    I got in a shipment of "doxycycline " yesterday from the Russian federation . Sometime between my order placement and its arrival doxycycline was taken off as being available from the Russian federation . I suspect government involvement behind the scenes on this change . It may be available from another source .
     
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  18. poltiregist

    poltiregist Expert Member
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    Lee ct ne - What does a fish hook removal tool look like ? I remember my grandfather getting a large hook in his thumb while out trying to get us a catfish for supper . He said there is no need to waste money going to the doctor .He slowly pushed the hook on through his thumb , cut off the barb with pliers and pulled it back out . As a youngster watching that was , impressed but horrified .
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2019
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  19. Lee CT NE

    Lee CT NE Expert Member
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    Just take a double-wrap of about 4-inches (8 total) of at least 20-pound test fishing line and attach to a dowel, etc. To remove the hook, place the double wrap of the line around the hook so the line rests in the inside bend of the hook. Hold the "eye" of the hook down to the surface of the skin. Quick and hard, pull back on the dowel, etc. and the hook will literally pop out the same way it went into the flesh. A lot less painful than the "old" way.
     
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  20. poltiregist

    poltiregist Expert Member
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    thanks for the feed back , our entire group does a lot of fishing , I will remember your trick on hook removal and hope I never have to use it .
     
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  21. poltiregist

    poltiregist Expert Member
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    After giving it some thought I think before fishing time this year , I am going to make me a hook removal tool and put it in my fishing vest .
     
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  22. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Expert Member
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    One thing I have not seen mentioned is Super Glue. Know why your fingers stick together? That is what is was designed to do for massive wounds in Viet Nam. If you have a deep cut glue it back together, and get to an emergency room. An Israeli bandage and a portable splint might be good to have. Cayenne pepper is also supposed to stop bleeding, but I have never tried it.
     
  23. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I always have a piece of heavy string around my neck for pulling hooks out. With it around my neck I can use the hands to position and press the hook down before popping it out. A word to the wise, if the hook is a treble hook or if it is just one hook on a lure that has other hooks you will be better off to remove the hook from the lure and the other barbed points from a treble hook. It SUCKS to pull out one point and end up with two more in you.

    Your medical kit needs to have as much as you are competent to use in it as long as you keep it small enough to easily carry. My little fishing med kit is in a pill bottle while my bug IN kit is a tackle box full of stuff.
     
  24. Lee CT NE

    Lee CT NE Expert Member
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    I personally don't use Super Glue, as it is a bit difficult to remove if surgery is necessary, although as a Navy Corpsman during the Vietnam ra, I was trained in it's use. Today, my prference is a Clotting Sponge/Strip containing 50g Zeolite. The removal is very easy. I push the sponge/strip in as far as I can, then cover with a sterile dressing.
    I also use the Israli Trauma Bandage, which I referred to by it's more generic name - Battlefield/Trauma Dressing.
    A portable splint is also great if you have the room. I do carry a small one for fingers.
    Cayenne Pepper - again very difficult to clean from the wound as are Hemostatic Power Blood Stop powder. Again, I prefer a Clotting Sponge/Strip containing 50g Zeolite.
    I also carry a CAT Tourniquet for severe bleeding. It can be applied with one-hand to yourself is necessary. However, get training on the use of a tourniquet before adding it to your kit.
    Great ideas sir. Appreciate the input!
     
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  25. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Expert Member
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    WOW!! Lee CT NE. You have probably forgotten more about emergency medical treatment than I will ever know. Thanks for your comments. I am curious about tourniquets. I have heard that they can do more harm than good. Many standard comments have been " Don't use a tourniquet unless you want to lose the limb. " Is that true? Are there better ways to stop severe bleeding without using a tourniquet? I have never carried one because I am unsure how to use it properly, and I always thought a tourniquet is something that could be improvised easily.

    I would love to hear your far more professional opinion. Thanks.
     
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  26. Lee CT NE

    Lee CT NE Expert Member
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    Thanks for your kind words.
    As for Tourniquets, I advocate their use. BUT, you must be trained. Improper use can result in loss of a limb. However, proper use can save a life.
    I work in this order when trying to stop bleeding.
    1. Direct Pressure with a Clotting Sponge/Strip containing 50g Zeolite
    2. Pressure Points
    3. Tourniquet
    IF THE BLEEDING IS BRIGHT RED=ARTERIAL BLEED. I immediately apply a tourniquet. Otherwise, the victim can bleed out in a very short time - 5 minutes or less, depending on the severity of the wound(s).
    Any Rescue Squad, Fire Department and Police Departments can provide instructions on use.
    It certainly is easy to improvise a tourniquet. However, the CATs are best, IMHO, and easiest to use. They also can be used one-handed on yourself.
    Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2019
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  27. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Expert Member
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    Thank you for the advice. Gives me even more of a reason to get more medical/first aid training.
     
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  28. GateCrasher

    GateCrasher Well-Known Member
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  29. Lee CT NE

    Lee CT NE Expert Member
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    Yes and No. In my experience both can present complications, especially when the TQ has not been properly applied. Also conversion is not always successful even when using a Clotting Sponge/Strip containing 50g Zeolite in concert with direct pressure and/or pressure point. The linked article gives excellent guidelines. Unfortunately, each case is different and bad things/complications can and do happen. Truly appreciate your input sir.
     
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  30. Lee CT NE

    Lee CT NE Expert Member
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    I would also suggest you consider looking into Stop The Bleed - http://stopthebleedingcoalition.org - and take the training if possible.
     
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  31. GateCrasher

    GateCrasher Well-Known Member
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    Agree completely, didn't mean to suggest the steps in the document ensured success. One catch-22 for a lot of post-SHTF injuries requiring a TQ might be in these statements:

    "Conversion should not be attempted on a patient in shock" and "With any concern for hemorrhagic shock, resuscitation must be initiated prior to attempted tourniquet conversion."

    IV fluid resuscitation isn't a capability many have, and could leave someone in the situation where it isn't recommended to try removing the TQ because of shock, but it also isn't recommended to leave it on any longer and risk reperfusion injury / kidney failure when removed later. It'd be interesting to hear what a trauma physician/RN might suggest in that case as the best course of action, or the least harmful one. Bet that'd be a long flowchart/decision matrix based on the injury and the skills/tools available.
     
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  32. Lee CT NE

    Lee CT NE Expert Member
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    As both a retired RN and former Navy Corpsman, allow me try to answer your question. Perform CPR as needed. If shock is due to extreme blood loss, aka hypovolemic shock, then a TQ needs to be used, maintain airway, keep victims feet raised about 12-inches, and keep the patient warm. In my training, TQ conversion was to be attempted when victim's symptoms (pale/moist skin, weak/absent pulse, respirations below 20/min., aggitated, lethargic, or restless) begin to decrease. Again, within 2 hours is the guideline to follow. Use Direct Pressure with a Clotting Sponge/Strip containing 50g Zeolite. If victim is conscious , able to swallow, and no injury to the abdomen is evident, then a weak salt/saline solution can be offered and taken orally in a SHTF scenario. This is what I would do.
    And yes, the matrix/flow chart would be huge. Too many varitables and each situation is unique. Hope this helps a bit.
     
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  33. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Expert Member
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    A comment on carrying more equipment than what you know how to use. You may not be the one providing emergency assistance. If the emergency is beyond your capabilities a doctor, nurse, EMT, may be available, and they can use the equipment you have to provide proper care. Who knows? They might even be using it on you.

    IMHO the most forgotten item is Immodium AD/ anti diarrheal medicine. For me it is like the American Express card. I don't leave home without it. It is in every bag I own. In my desk. In my car. No worse feeling in the world.
     
  34. GateCrasher

    GateCrasher Well-Known Member
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    News articles from recent years out of Venezuela said that while hospitals were open and staffed, they lacked even basic supplies and medications. Family members of patients were given a list of what to acquire (often on the black market) to treat and care for the patient and to bring them to the hospital before they'd admit them. IV supplies, needles/syringes, bandages and dressings, catheters, and a lot of other basic medical supplies are cheap and easy to get now, and basically last forever.
     
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  35. Lee CT NE

    Lee CT NE Expert Member
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    I keep a heavier prescription ant-diarrheal and an anti-nausea. Bt folks should at least keep the OTCs.
     
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