Pig Hunt

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by ColtFord, May 10, 2019.

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  1. ColtFord

    ColtFord New Member
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    In your opinion what is the most effective rifle or caliber to use for feral pig/wild boar hunting?
     
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  2. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I have known people to use .44 magnum in an underlever, others use a 12 gauge shotgun. Personally I favour the larger calibers, a charging boar can take some stopping sometimes! I used to use a .45/70 Marlin 1895 underlever. These days I use a .60 caliber.
    ed7bd2fc3ec141ed319faf98addd3983.jpeg
    Keith.
     
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  3. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    A lot depends on what you want the rifle to do. Around here where hogs are a problem and like an infestation, a lot of people use 5.56 ARs because you can shoot them and let them run off to die and not have to deal with the body.

    If you are hunting them for meat in brush country you can't beat a lever action 44 mag. But a 30-30 will do a nice job too. I like the lever action carbines for their shorter fast action. Hogs are not friendly prey and can tear you up. In brush where they might be close, you want a little extra in the way of stopping power. A 12 ga shotgun with slugs wouldn' be overkill.

    At distances of 100 yards or more a scoped 308 bolt action or any of the many larger bore bolt actions will do a nice job. A Nagant will work. They are surprisingly accurate and with commercial loads good stoppers on par with a 30-o6.

    PS: Kieth, the 45-70 is a good answer for nearly anything. It is one of the great all-around loadings right up there with the 30-06.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2019
  4. ColtFord

    ColtFord New Member
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    That's good to know. Wild boar meat is safe because it rarely becomes infected with the triciknosis (sp) parasite. Other feral pigs though do present a health problem.
     
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  5. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    Good thread!

    I have not heard this before, but maybe I've been isolated in my neck of the woods too long?

    I went looking for more information and found reputable sources too numerous to list here, but the Google search phrase, "wild boar trichinosis" will give you an idea of what I came across:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=wil...0j69i57j0l4.4721j1j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

    I'm just happy that thoroughly cooking any kind of hog/boar meat renders it safe because that's some fine eating!



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  6. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Master Survivalist
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    When hunting boar in the swamps, I use a 12 ga with 3" slugs. Sight lines are often very short due to all the underbrush. Often times you only get one shot.
     
  7. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Pig of any kind is a meat that you need to cook really well. Pigs are amazingly similar to people in their health and general body chemistry. You can give a pig a cold and he can do the same for you. The parasites that can live in them will live in you and EAT YOU UP if you don't cook the meat enough to kill any possible parasites or bacteria. I suspect that after a Jewish person watched someone die from a parasite they got from eating poorly cooked pork they decided that God didn't want them eating his pig!! A boar is just the name for an adult make swine and can carry all sorts of thing too.

    Domestic pigs are inspected and treated to prevent this in most cases but nonetheless, people eat pork well done. Most of what we have around here are feral hogs descended from escaped domestic stock. Over the years though some idiots have released Russia Boars and now we have them interbreeding with the piney woods rooters. what that means is bigger, more aggressive and dangerous hogs. We kill them in mass but they are breeding faster than we can kill them. Most hunters kill them year around and then kill one or two in the winter to mix with venison to make sausage.

    In one night a herd of hogs can turn a field that is nearly ready to harvest into a field that looks like it has just been plowed, disked and ready to be rowed up and planted.
     
  8. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Master Survivalist
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    OTOH, pit roasted pig is some of the best eating anywhere. Seasoned with wild onion and garlic. Just great eating.
     
  9. ColtFord

    ColtFord New Member
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    Actually according to sources I have read wild boar meat is not afflicted with the parasite that causes trichinosis. Or that particular parasite is rare. It is true about cooking the meat of other feral hogs well to prevent any type of sickness. I think it is also important to have a decent scope on your rifle and of course shot placement is always key to good hunting.
     
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  10. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Pigs really are about some of the best eating that there is. Life without bacon would truly TRAGIC!!! At one time the place where I used to live we built a rotary pig cooker out of a 500-gallon propane tank. It had a firebox on one end and then in the body of the tank, we made a spit that would hold an entire pig that weighed about 150 pounds alive. We put a variable speed motor on that thing and would smoke and roast the hog all night before parties. Lordy, that meat was good.
     
  11. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    My fathers people are Hawaiian. They cook their pig Luau style in the ground. It s' good....very nice.

    But I've been here on the border of Virginia/North Carolina long enough to have developed a taste for Pig cooked their way....coals or wood around it on a spit. And boy oh..boy do I ever love a good pork barbecue sandwich.

    In Hawaii...the feral pigs are tearing up the flora and fauna....the habitat for certain ground nesting birds and other creatures.. They are a nuisance in Hawaii as well.

    To illustrate how strong a pigs jaws are....the Macadamia nuts sometimes fall to the ground...in their green fruit with the nut inside. It looks sort of like a green orange. Then it dries up and the macadamia nut inside is exposed. This is a very hard shelled nut...very hard ..harder than a Brazil nut. The pigs come down into the Macadamia nut groves and crush these Macadamia nuts in their jaws.
    I cannot even guess at what that is in pounds per square inch but it must be up there.

    My cousins and nephews often hunt and trap them in these Macadamia nut groves.

    But some of them with bigger ones hanging between their legs......hunt them the olde ways..with dogs and spears.

    Not me ......12 gauge slugs....30-30...or .308!!! or even my .41 Magnum...lever gun and matching Blackhawk.

    I don't need that much excitement in my life that I need to use a spear...on a wild pig.

    And I have an Assegai Spear. I just have no ambition to adjust a wild pigs "pissed off" attitude with a spear.


    My non Ishmaelite .02,
    Watcherchris
     
  12. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    A boar spear has a cross piece on it because a boar will charge right up the spear to get to you and tear you UP. the cross piece is to prevent that. Note the cross piece and the long shaft.
    5de33bdc3d2893051e2f7d5422fa2c28.jpeg

    Assegai Spears have no cross piece and a shorter shaft. They only hunt lions with these.

    In India, the wild boars are considered more dangerous to hunt than tigers.
    v4EEKBTK_SAZ1DRT87cKK5ztJx0YG_fn.jpeg

    The European, Russian and Indian Boars are truly BAD monsters. Personally to me hunting either with a spear is hard to imagine. Those guys must have to have a wheelbarrow to haul their balls around in!!!! Or they are CRAZY!!!
     
  13. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    +100% to that!

    The video in post #3 in the thread linked below is also that special kind of crazy... Hunting boar with a primitive atlatl. Imagine that.

    https://mysurvivalforum.com/threads/what-is-a-atlatl.6118/#post-41778



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  14. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I don't know, an atlatl is amazingly powerful. A lot of the ladies that my wife works with are big into hunting and two of them have taken boars with bow and arrow. I might do that but I would do it from a danm stand in a TREE!

    My wife is a dental Hygienist and the office she worked in for years had some of the most hunt crazy people there that I've ever seen. They all carried a concealed weapon at work including the dentist. On the weekends they would get together and have a hog hunt. The Dentist closed early on the Friday before deer season so everyone could get their stands and stuff finished.

    There is one little dental assistant (5'2" and about 1110) that if she ever thinks about it will probably think that poking a big a$$ boar with a pointy stick might sound fun.

    Hey Mizz Grizz, you lived in South Louisianna. I know that you have known cajun ladies that would take on a boar with a broom. I actually saw that one time. They got on her porch after some dog food. Them cajun ladies don't know what back up IS.
     
  15. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    True, dat! My mama would say something like, "The AUDACITY of that (pig/gator/or 4-legged thug)!" She was not quite five feet tall and weighed 109 pounds, but thought nothing of standing up to anything or anyone who would do her or us kids any harm. Although we witnessed that fact many times, we kids were normal (at the time) and had normal respect for things bigger than ourselves. I remember more than a few spectacular incidents...but the funniest was seeing her knocking a would-be thief out cold with her heavy purse. That was an empowering moment for me as a little girl...and my life has never quite been the same since, lol.


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    Last edited: May 12, 2019
  16. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    I am a big fan of the 45-70. You really never know what kind of monster hog you might run into. I want something that will drop it in its tracks.
     
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  17. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Master Survivalist
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    I have been considering a 44 carbine. Any thoughts on those?
     
  18. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    A 44 carbine would be a good choice for medium game. I have always been a huge sucker for lever actions, and I love having a rifle and handgun with the same caliber. I have always wanted a Henry, but they can be a little pricey, and I 'm sure there are other choices. You do have a choice of ammo; either 44 special or 44 magnum. Can you tell I like options and versatility?

    Here is a link that shows some ballistic tests between rifle and handgun. They look like they would get the job done.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2019
  19. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I wish that I had bought and kept one of the Ruger 44 mag semi-auto carbines. It was like a 44 mag 10-22!! The 44 mag in a lever action carbine is a stopper and a great brush gun. My only issue is that the carbines don't fit me well and the 44 mag kicks like a mule to me. that is strange because I have no problem with bigger calibers in Rifle-sized guns.

    Miz Grizz one of the things that I know as a fact here is that before women's lib came along, at least in Texas and South Louisianna, A young man, no matter how big he was, messed with a little lady. Our Mama's had indoctrinated us with the certainty that to do so was instant death!!! My wife used to laugh at the convicts because the older guys ALL instantly responded to her when she gave them the stink eye. Their Mama's didn't raise any fools they knew what that look meant! Younger women sometimes had problems handling them but the older ladies were walking embodiment of the MAMA MOJOE and they didn't cross it.

    A lot of the things about the way women were treated needed to be changed but as a sweet little old lady told me one time on the subject. "Piss on Equality! Why would I step down and accept THAT!??" My Dad was a 6'4" monster and he wore the pants in our house...but MAMA ran the house and if he wanted to push it the pants were about all he ran. Mama let him do whatever he wanted to do but strangely he mostly did what made MAMA happy. In some ways I think that the womens lib was an iffy win for most ladies.
     
  20. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    Women's "Lib" has devolved into the most embarrassing thing to ever happen to womankind! I am ashamed for them. They are not MY species of animal. Ugh. And here they are, giving us REAL women a bad name...

    May the fleas of a thousand dogs invade their stupid you-know-what hats.


    Signed,
    I-will-draw-bathwater-for-my-man-and-bring-him-a-sammich-too


    .
     
  21. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    My wife takes good care of me. I also massage her feet and will paint her toenails. Isn't that how things are supposed to go??
     
  22. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    Haha! I love this place! Where else can you have a rollicking good thread about hog hunting, complete with a nice variety of good rifles, shotguns, spears, spearthrowers (atlatls), wild hogs, boars, AND massaging women's feet and painting their toenails... all in one grand thread?!?

    I will never, evah be bored here!

    .
     
  23. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Master Survivalist
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    Nothing wrong with painting your wife's toenails. What I liked was brushing her hair, getting a good back scratch in return was icing on the cake.
     
  24. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    I used t o enjoy massaging my lady friends feet...while watching television.

    But I will admit..there was an ulterior motive. Soon enough she was out like a light and I got the remote controller!!!!

    I never could stand watching Dr. Phil or that bald headed guy who worked for Jerry Springer. Never liked Jerry Springer as well.


    Watcherchris,
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
  25. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    It just keeps getting better and most betterest in here!!! Y’all are good ones to ride the river with!



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  26. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Yeah...TexDanm...is this not called by some in social/Economic terms........"Division of labor!!??"
     
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  27. AusNZBushRanger

    AusNZBushRanger New Member
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    For a long range sniper rifle I'd go with a Tikka 595 in .308 caliber. A 30/06 might also be a good choice. I'm not an expert in firearms though.
     
  28. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Texdanm and others,

    What I remember my uncles and cousins and nephews..telling me about using spears against wild pig in Hawaii...is that they would run them with dogs and use the terrain to corner them..only one way out.....then put them down.

    Yes.Indeed ..even this is dangerous...even and especially dangerous on the dogs...

    I doubt that they have that kind of cold steel spear..but they are not beyond adapting or making/fabricating their own....They are like that ….having learned from the olde ones..


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  29. arctic bill

    arctic bill Master Survivalist
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    they tell me that wild hogs are invading canada. I always thought it would be too cold for them. are they dangerous? what do you do when you see one? what are the does and don't/
     
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  30. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    To some extent hog hunting and running them with dogs has replaced coon hunting as a for fun hunting sport. In both cases, hunting the animals are/were hunted and killed to eliminate them as pests and destructive animals rather than as food or trophy hunts. Coons are hard on your chickens and other small livestock and will give a small corn patch a hard time so in rural areas, they were killed on sight much as wolves were in ranching areas. When I was a kid there was a bounty on wolves. My Godfather made good money hunting them to supplement a farming income. A pack of wolves would take out a lot of calves in the spring if you didn't bring your cows up near the house when they were nearing time to drop a calf.
     
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  31. AusNZBushRanger

    AusNZBushRanger New Member
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    They are extremely durable and very dangerous. Boars/razorbacks are also aggressive. Unless you, your family, or livestock in danger I'd just let it be and keep plenty of distance. I think the do's/dont's are common sense. Obviously messing with or trying to play with them would be a don't. If you do shoot one or discover an already injured one then be careful. Even injured it could still be a threat. It may seem cruel but it's best to put the animal out of its misery rather than let it suffer.
     
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  32. Proton Entropy

    Proton Entropy Expert Member
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    I can attest for the Tikka as I have the 695, which is the same except a longer action to hold the 6.5x55 Swedish Mauser cartridge.

    I think a semi auto 308w is better than a huge 45-70. If the pig tries to get you a quick follow up shot would be nice, and I would not want to be kicked so much by recoil.
    For even more stopping power I think 9.3x62 is nice, tough too much kick in it.
     
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  33. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    In thick swamps or jungle habitat, I would recommend a 12 Ga. Shotgun with 00Buckshot in the first 2 rounds, then rifled slugs. For most agricultural habitats in the USA, I'd recommend something in the 308 Win/7.62Nato class in a semiautomatic (AR10, M1A, G3, etc.), as multiple targets are the norm. Especially for night hunting. Yes, most pigs are not that big (under 100 pounds) but there are some very large pigs mixed in with them and they can be dangerous. Also, most hunters are not the greatest of shots and a hog can take a lot of punishment before staying down. Anyone interested in long range shooting on hogs I would recommend a bolt action in 30-06 or preferably 300 Win Mag for out to 1000 to 1200 Meters. Just my .02 cents.

    Dale
     
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  34. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Texdanm….

    I'd not thought of it in this light but you make a good point here.

    So far I have not heard many stories of wild hogs in Virginia but expect over the years for them to be migrating up here. What we are getting more and more of up here is Coyotes. Been waiting to hear nightmare stories of suburbanites moved out into the country having their unattended toddlers snatched from their yards via coyotes.


    Thanks for bringing that to my attention about hog hunting replacing coon hunting. I'd not thought of it that way.

    Friend of mind moved to Texas...talking about hunting hogs with a 30-30...and some kind of lever ammo designed for hogs...in that calibration.

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  35. Caribou

    Caribou Master Survivalist
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    A 30-30 would do the job but a 7.62X39 is a similar round and you can readily get it in semi-auto. This could be important when dealing with a sounder.
     
  36. Snyper

    Snyper Master Survivalist
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    They've been there for decades already.
    a206bdbe7b3085c2afd197ba6c36dad3.jpeg
     
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  37. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Hogs are hated by the Forestry folk and the Wildlife Management people. They tear-up the forest floor. They're not natural to North America. Texas has a very serious problem with hawg overpopulation. Game warden public quote, "We're not going to barbecue our way out of this one."

    Hogs don't climb. Just a thought.

    Buckshot

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=buckshot+group+hogs&&view=detail&mid=7CC67F002EBCD069E27A7CC67F002EBCD069E27A&&FORM=VRDGAR&ru=/videos/search?q=buckshot+group+hogs&FORM=HDRSC3

    OK, so these little piggies weren't that big, but these things just have to be wiped-out.

    Australia got overwhelmed with rabbits (and mice). If some critter ain't got no natural enemy, then you got yourself an ecological nightmare.

    Killing little pigs and sows, not so much a problem, however ... Big boar hawgs have a gristle plate. Some folk call it a shoulder shield, whatever.

    https://feralhogs.extension.org/shoulder-shields-in-feral-hogs/

    And their skulls are very thick. As a boy, I was handed a big hawg's head and told to get its brains out. I didn't know what to do. As I chopped and chopped with my hatchet, I learned just how thick these skulls are. With that said, my pap would just shoot'em in the head (aiming from the top) with a .22 rifle and it would kill them. He also used the flat side of an axe to knock them out, hang'em up, knife their jugulars or carotids, and let it bleed out. You don't want a hog to come back into consciousness after having been stuck -- unbelievable gore-fest as it thrashes about.

    You can whack a hog with a .22 magnum.
    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...C1C3D4E775519CCBA653C1C&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

    even a .177 pellet rifle if you shoot it in the head
    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...E0CA8C070D70C0A2D27EE0C&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

    But but with huge boar hawgs, I'd go with some real weapon.

    Here's a 550 pounder killed with a .243 (which many would consider a too-small caliber):

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...3B3F7EB413D4817937373B3&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

    Everything is shot placement, but if one of those monster critters was coming straight at me, I'd want a thumper. Something like a warm-loaded 45-70 or more. Maybe a heavy slug out a 12 ga. I'd want a rifle that I could swing very quickly also. Who'd care about recoil when your looking at getting disemboweled!

    If there is some big tusked oinker out there and I'm in thick undergrowth, gimme a big-bore lever with ghost ring sights. I would not seek-out this situation. I'm no glutton for punishment, but if I HAD to be in that situation, I'd not be carrying a .25 automatic. Dad was the gambler.

    Big hawg? Well, hmmmmm, .... let's see .... lotta corn on the ground, trip wire, and a can with a interior diameter that would hold the spoon on a frag after the pin is pulled.

    Do not expect homey to play fair.
    .
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2020
  38. Proton Entropy

    Proton Entropy Expert Member
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    I'd still make a case for the 9.3x62 cartridge as a hog hunting rifle.
    • It outpowers the 45-70 and slugs by far
    • I suspect BC is much better
    • At least in Sweden they are abundant (don't know how it is in US?)
    • Right now a used semi auto Browning BAR 9.3x62 with Aimpoint red dot asking price is roughly $500
    One great thing with .45-70 from a preppers perspective is that you can cast bullets for it easily. 9.3 would require swaging I think.

    45-70 would certainly be good enough for hogs, though not better than 9.3 in my opinion :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2020
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  39. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Hmmm....Proton Enthropy's post got me to looking in my Hornady reloading manual at 9.3 x 62 mm reloading tables...

    Bullet weights start at 250 grains and work up to some 300 grains.

    Velocity is not high..but it is obvious that this round is for penetration..and or energy delivery.

    This is not a round I would favor as it is a metric calibration...but if I had it ...would definitely reload..

    Varget is a nice all round powder for a number of calibrations.

    Agree with some of the other members ..in 45-70.....444 Marlin...or even .35 Remington...lever rifle.

    And also about playing fair...


    My non Ishmaelite .02,
    Watcherchris
     
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  40. AusNZBushRanger

    AusNZBushRanger New Member
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    .308 Win or a .270 win but that's just me.
     
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  41. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    In the USA, most folk do not think about European calibers. And being a European, you first think of European calibers. In the USA, one would have to order the 9.3x62. Can't go to the outdoor store and simply pick up a boxes of 9.3x62.

    Excellent cartridge the 9.3x62. One could no doubt find such chamberings in a rifle here in the USA, even in semi-auto, but one would have to do some searching. The .338 Winchester mag. is readily available here in the USA. Loadings here in .338 include heavy bullets and energy levels equivalent to or greater than the 9.3x62. Jumping up a notch in power, one could go .375 H&H -- this one's been around forever and ammunition is readily available here in the USA. The .35 Whelen has also been a performer for decades here in North America.

    Americans use lever actions due to them being easy to wield in brush where one's shots are not going to be lengthy at all. What's most important is to be able to swing-and-fire very quickly, lest you be severely injured or killed. Bears and boars are given to going outrageously aggressive.

    For a large bore lever actions, one could go .50 Alaskan:

    upload_2020-4-9_10-6-20.png

    Here are some hotter loads for the .50 Alaskan:

    https://www.buffalobore.com/index.php?l=product_list&c=39

    https://www.outdoorlimited.com/rimf...n-ht50ak450af-450-grain-soft-point-20-rounds/
     
  42. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Y'know what, a Ruskie round out a semi-auto rifle may just be a good idea if one could find the correct bullet.

    FMJs, no. Story of two airmen in Alaska who both dumped their M1 Garands (ball ammo FMJ) into a brown bear -- the bear killed them both & started gnawing on one of the bodies (partially covered the human to come back to dine later).

    But maybe there's a soft point bullet for the 7.62x39 that would be appropriate. I am NOT familiar with loadings for these Ruskie cartridges.

    What I would like is that one could keep on dumping rounds into the monster. I'd want some more penetration that buckshot can provide. Slugs out a semi-auto shotgun have enough recoil to slow the process of dumping rounds. With a high capacity magazine, one could dump 10-20 rounds of 762x39 into a killer boar hog charging.





    They don't just come at you from the front
    https://www.facebook.com/www.centra...inking-right-here-must-watch/188733867987784/

    At a little bit over 11 minutes into this video, things start getting interesting for this hunter using a thermal scope:


    And they bite


    A shotgun slug brought this charging boar down
    https://www.liveleak.com/view?t=uLObs_1581737838

    I'm not hunting with this guy:


    This fellow is lucky
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=boe1ysiQ0mI
     
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  43. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
      510/575

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    Agree with Olde Geezer...

    The reloading tables look very good for the 9.3 x 62mm calibration and it is clear that this caliber is designed to deliver substantial energy and penetration.

    However....agree with Olde Geezer...in ammunition availability...as this is not a commonly available calibration here in the states. With other calibers available ….coast to coast...I would be want to go with a .35 Remington or bigger..
    Well said Olde Geezer....well said.

    I had a similar issue with having a .41 magnum and as this is not a common caliber available in most stores...I resorted to buying my own Starline brass and then reloading. It would be the same had I ownership of a 9.3 x 62mm firearm.
    No doubt about it 9.3 x 62mm being able to deliver the necessary energy....
    Stateside ammunition availability is my issue with it.

    Many of my "Tools" are in fact selected for common ammunition availability in addition to how I need them to deliver energy...

    And I reload for most of my "Tools."

    Those calibrations for which I own and are not commonly available coast to coast...I take great pains to have sufficient materials for reloading.



    The 7.62 x 39 mm calibration is available in 150 grain soft points for hunting purposes. I believe common calibration is some 123 grain FMJ bullets though there are also soft points around that grain 123 grain weight.

    I wanted a bolt gun in 7.62 x 39mm but at that cost for such an bolt action rifle.....I decided to stay with the SKS rifle ….as it was commonly available coast to coast and very reliable....simple..for what it is. Hard to argue with that.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris

    Not an Ishmaelite
     
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  44. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    You are reminding me Olde Geezer of an interesting tale told to me by my Dad...after WW2 and a bunch of the guys in their squad checked out military rifles to go hunting....boar in Germany. The checked out M1 Garands and M1 Carbines.

    They got a boar and filled it full of holes...problem was that they were using military ammo....FMJ rounds.

    They figured they put some 15 rounds of FMJ into the animal from their M1 Garands and M1 Carbines.

    Problem was that the boar fled into some heavy brush..and no one was going to go in there and flush the boar out.

    A few days later they came back and found the boar by smell....but while the boar was alive...no one was volunteering to go in there and flush the critter out.

    Wise move....




    Speaking of common calibrations...I have my Dad's olde Mauser rifle....

    It I a converted sporterized Mauser....recalibrated into 30.06 American Caliber from the European 8mm x 57 calibration. Double set triggers and a detachable scope.

    When the set trigger is activated...look out....that firing trigger is very very sensitive.

    But it is very nice workmanship in this rifle....first rate..hand checkering and such..

    My father told me that after the war....German money was not very good while the German economy was settling out ..post war.

    He told me he paid the gunsmith.... $20.00 American and two cartons of Lucky Strikes.
    Obviously American cigarettes were as good as cash....and very liquid in that economy.

    I expect that was an excellent deal for that gunsmith as well as my father...in those desperate post war days....economically speaking.

    I also expect that this was a totally underground deal in post war Germany.


    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2020
    Caribou and TMT Tactical like this.
  45. Caribou

    Caribou Master Survivalist
      380/460

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    If I am going after boar I want the semiauto f0r two reasons dealing with sounders and charging boars. The SKS-M with a 30 round changeable magazine would be a good choice. Any of the .308 (7.62 NATO) would be even better though heavier and slightly longer second shots.

    I really like the video's. I do have a .177 Gamo. No, that will not be my goto for boar but I will file that information away. The better the shot placement the less power that is required.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
    1. TMT Tactical
      How about a 308 PISTOL? Fire power and very maneuverable. Might make a good brush gun.
       
      TMT Tactical, Apr 10, 2020
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